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Posted: 12/24/2003 7:39:26 PM EDT
For those of you with Vac packers.

Buy your beef. Beef prices have finally went down.

NY strip 4 days ago was 8.99lb.  I bought a slab today at 3.06lb .  A butchers at your local store will cut it for free if you ask.


About the mad cow incident in washington:

I betting the mad cow incident in washington was a result of smuggling.  A few cattle raisers have been buying cheap beef up north and sneaking them in to the US on cattle trucks as US exports as rejects at canadian processing plants claiming overstocked.

The truckers can say they were never off the truck and are allowed back into the US.  




Link Posted: 12/24/2003 7:48:21 PM EDT
Yes, [b]one cow[/b] was found to have MCD.  SO?  I intend to conintue to eat my share of beef without any concern.

Of course, here in Texas, beef is the state snack.  [:D]

CMOS
Link Posted: 12/24/2003 7:54:33 PM EDT
I totally agree.
Link Posted: 12/24/2003 8:37:57 PM EDT
Mmmmm, steak.
Link Posted: 12/24/2003 9:06:18 PM EDT
Japan says " you no send no more mad cow beef here, we no want you mad cow beef you keepa that mad cow beef in your own country"

I saw, rare medium and keep serving it up!

I'm looking forward to prime rib prices dropping like a rock as all the fraidy cats run away from that yummy beef.
Link Posted: 12/24/2003 9:18:31 PM EDT
you know what.. i dont care.. i trust most food in the US, infact, i think ill go buy some tri-tips, some rib-eyes, some porterhouse, and maybe a few other cuts to support beef market in the US.

Link Posted: 12/24/2003 9:34:58 PM EDT
Listen 2 me you jamokes[;)] go to Costco and get some "bufflao" burger" mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm, I could'nt believe it!
Link Posted: 12/24/2003 9:46:25 PM EDT
I saw on another board:

Mad cow in Washington

the reply

So Hillary is upset again?
Link Posted: 12/24/2003 9:59:29 PM EDT
Besides if you stay away from organ meats you can eat the whole damn mad cow and not get sick.
Link Posted: 12/24/2003 10:00:59 PM EDT
Cheap beef!!!

Yum...

And guess what, you have more chance of being killed on the way to the store by some idiot who's DWI than you do of catching KJD (the human form of MCD)...
Link Posted: 12/24/2003 11:35:13 PM EDT
I'd like to eat some cow brains. Do you think those will be cheaper??? [ROFL]
Link Posted: 12/25/2003 12:09:59 AM EDT
Link Posted: 12/25/2003 4:47:02 AM EDT
Shoot after living overseas for 3 years and not getting it,I still like my beef,but raising it in the back yard is looking more appealing though.
Link Posted: 12/25/2003 5:11:07 AM EDT
Originally Posted By MrsWildweasel:
Shoot after living overseas for 3 years and not getting it,I still like my beef,but raising it in the back yard is looking more appealing though.
View Quote


That is what we do, 3-4 a year, and it tastes better  also. Plus it is loaded with tax deduction possibilities.
Link Posted: 12/25/2003 5:20:19 AM EDT

I betting the mad cow incident in washington was a result of smuggling.  A few cattle raisers have been buying cheap beef up north and sneaking them in to the US on cattle trucks as US exports as rejects at canadian processing plants claiming overstocked.

The truckers can say they were never off the truck and are allowed back into the US.  
View Quote


I'm sure there is smuggling from Canada but you may be wrong on this particular cow.  It was a Holstein cow that came from a dariy farm in the Yakima River Valley.  Many dairy farms along the river valley.
Link Posted: 12/25/2003 5:53:21 AM EDT
Lets see....

By mid January...

Hamburger 25 cents a pound...

Ribeyes at $1.99 a pound

Standing Rib Roast (Prime Rib) at Value packed $1.49 a pound...


MuuuHAHAHAHAHAHAHHAHAHAH
Link Posted: 12/25/2003 8:20:09 AM EDT
Originally Posted By cyanide:
Originally Posted By MrsWildweasel:
Shoot after living overseas for 3 years and not getting it,I still like my beef,but raising it in the back yard is looking more appealing though.
View Quote


That is what we do, 3-4 a year, and it tastes better  also. Plus it is loaded with tax deduction possibilities.
View Quote


How do you finish your cattle off?  PAsture/forage or a grain heavy ration?  I sell mine at feeder weight due to cost of properly grain finishing an animal.  I am looking for an econimical way to get the proper level of marbeling without going broke doing it on a small scale.
Link Posted: 12/26/2003 4:31:40 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/26/2003 4:32:02 AM EDT by cyanide]
We coral them, and give them a  heavy grain ration along with unlimited supplies of apples as we have a unlimited supply of apples.
Link Posted: 12/26/2003 5:07:37 AM EDT
Originally Posted By cyanide:
We coral them, and give them a  heavy grain ration along with unlimited supplies of apples as we have a unlimited supply of apples.
View Quote


How long do ya feed 'em this, before slaughter???
Link Posted: 12/26/2003 5:18:27 AM EDT
2 - 3 months, they have grain all the time.
Link Posted: 12/26/2003 5:54:20 AM EDT
Atkins is going to be interesting now.
Link Posted: 12/26/2003 6:08:48 AM EDT
They Still Like Their Beef

By Víctor Manuel Ramos
Staff Writer

December 26, 200

If there is a mad cow scare, it was not evident this week at the Peter Luger Steak House in Great Neck, where business was brisk as people streamed in and out, making reservations for a holiday dinner or taking advantage of available tables to have their red meat.

And, apparently, they weren't having any second thoughts about eating at a fine steakhouse on Christmas Eve.

"I just had the best hamburger in the world," claimed Adam Marshak, of Port Washington. "The meat here is dried for several weeks, so I don't think anything tainted would have been here now ... This is one place I could trust."

While there were no signs of widespread panic, some Long Islanders said the potentially deadly consequences of tainted meat was on their minds as they sat down to enjoy their holiday meals. Among those who were worried, their biggest concern were the lowbrow hamburger joints, the corner deli meat, processed ground beef products and maybe even the supermarket beef sections.

However, for the moment, a lot of those looking for meat after the mad cow news broke even seemed fanatic about their loyalty to porterhouse steaks and juicy burgers.

Jim Matos, of Hicksville, said he is tired of meat scares, and that he would not change his eating habits. "I looove meat," Matos said.

Peter Luger staff declined to comment, but the company's Web site states the steakhouse only uses "the finest USDA prime steaks" handpicked by family members who examine the meat to weed out what doesn't appear healthy.

Other steakhouses along Great Neck's Northern Boulevard seemed to be serving well, with their parking lots filled with cars around lunchtime Wednesday.

Customers were skeptical about any real threat in New York because of what they said was an isolated incident in Washington. A few said they believe mad cow disease is a European problem.

"I'm going to have me a steak," said Brian Conwell, who drove from Astoria, Queens, to Great Neck for that purpose. "I suspect that this mad cow stuff is overreported."

Customers at the more affordable Burger King on Jericho Turnpike in Garden City Park also chomped away at their burgers with mayo, lettuce and tomato. The eatery's manager said he had not noticed any significant change in sales.

Matthew Varughese and 14-year-old son Michael, of Manhasset, knew about the mad cow case and still stopped for burgers. Their rationale was simple. "Well, you have to eat something," Michael said.

A table away, Dave Sherman and Lilly Spergel, of New Hyde Park, had no worries for themselves.

"I'm a chicken guy, and so is she," Sherman said, "but this has to be bad for the economy. It will affect the country."

Barry Gaynor of Melville said he was troubled by the discovery of mad cow disease in the United States and plans to curtail his consumption of beef.

"I'm not happy," Gaynor said Thursday as he left a movie theater in Farmingdale. "It certainly is a problem and I'll be watching what happens next."

But Jeff Montaigneage of Plainview said he wasn't worried. "I feel more comfortable knowing the beef I eat is kosher," he said.

[url]http://www.newsday.com/ny-lirest1226,0,7080581.story?coll=ny-top-headlines[/url]

Jim Matos, of Hicksville, said he is tired of meat scares, and that he would not change his eating habits. "I looove meat," Matos said.
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Meeeee tooooooo!! [banana]
Link Posted: 12/26/2003 6:34:08 AM EDT
Originally Posted By CMOS:
Yes, [b]one cow[/b] [red]was found[/red] to have MCD.  SO?  I intend to conintue to eat my share of beef without any concern.

Of course, here in Texas, beef is the state snack.  [:D]

CMOS
View Quote


The story leaves more questions than answers.  How many cattle are tested?  How early in the disease can the tests detect it.  How often are the cattle tested?  Is it something so contagious that the entire heard can be infected by the time the test at animal slaughter exposes disease?

Of course, if the disease came from infected feed, where else did the feed go?  Hopefully it's an isolated incident, but there isn't enough information in the sound bites that I have heard to make an educated guess one way or another.  Knowing how people cut corners and make great assumptions on safety, I wouldn't be surprised if the problem is already widespread enough to make clean-up a painful process.  Again, that's given very limited info and assuming a near-worst-case scenario.

As a pessimist, I doubt I'll be able to stay away from all beef, though.  [;D]  However, this will probably be enough to keep me from those rare temptations to eat at McDonald's.
Link Posted: 12/26/2003 2:57:18 PM EDT
knock off the horns, wipe its nasty ole butt, and chuck it down on the plate, mmmmm
Link Posted: 12/26/2003 3:22:21 PM EDT
Squib: That's the $64,000 question the USDA is trying to answer. We really don't know how wide spread the problem is, and then if you look further the scientists really don't know a whole heck a lot about the disease and the cause/effect relationship between humans & cattle.
Link Posted: 12/26/2003 3:31:51 PM EDT
Good thing my freezer is packed with venison.
Link Posted: 12/26/2003 3:40:27 PM EDT
Originally Posted By warlord:
Squib: That's the $64,000 question the USDA is trying to answer. We really don't know how wide spread the problem is, and then if you look further the scientists really don't know a whole heck a lot about the disease and the cause/effect relationship between humans & cattle.
View Quote


Roger that.  The key point we have hit is that it is too early to say either way about the situation.  Hopefully those that have access to the information will learn from history and not make the same mistakes that were made in other places.
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