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Posted: 2/15/2012 7:12:36 AM EDT
Time to face it. Despite my efforts I am on a downward spiral
in so far as my health is concerned. 2 separate Dr's have
recommended bariatric surgery for me. I am currently seriously
considering it. Not banding type surgery, as I am not a "gluttonous"
eater, but rather the stomach reconfiguration and bypass type.

I will be attending a seminar/info session at a local hospital
soon, but I am the typical "classic" cantidate for this. Borderline
Type II diabetic, on meds for hypertension, triglycerides, thyroid
issues - the whole shebang. BMI is terrible. On CPAP for OSA.

Cerrent medical literature and findings indicate massive weight loss,
discontinuation of dietary meds. Normalized HgA1C, Seems like a
viable option, however radical.

Anyone have any experience with this? I know this is GD - so if you have
no constructive input please dont comment at all. Keep the "Eat more salad,
train harder, run farther, step away from the buffet, stop eating gummy bear"
comments to yourself please......This is a hard enough decision as it is.
Link Posted: 2/15/2012 7:14:19 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/15/2012 7:24:56 AM EDT by Ghetto]
Eat less move more.

I'm 36 and have dropped almost 40lbs in 10 weeks. Surgery is for quitters.

ETA: I know 2 women who have had the surgery (co worker of my wife and a friends wife), one has been hospitalized a few times from complications and another has living off of refried beans and other soft mushy food ever since, sure she's lost 80lbs but her life is Hell because of it.
Link Posted: 2/15/2012 7:18:57 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Zoomer302:
Time to face it. Despite my efforts I am on a downward spiral
in so far as my health is concerned. 2 separate Dr's have
recommended bariatric surgery for me. I am currently seriously
considering it. Not banding type surgery, as I am not a "gluttonous"
eater, but rather the stomach reconfiguration and bypass type.

I will be attending a seminar/info session at a local hospital
soon, but I am the typical "classic" cantidate for this. Borderline
Type II diabetic, on meds for hypertension, triglycerides, thyroid
issues - the whole shebang. BMI is terrible. On CPAP for OSA.

Cerrent medical literature and findings indicate massive weight loss,
discontinuation of dietary meds. Normalized HgA1C, Seems like a
viable option, however radical.

Anyone have any experience with this? I know this is GD - so if you have
no constructive input please dont comment at all. Keep the "Eat more salad,
train harder, run farther, step away from the buffet, stop eating gummy bear"
comments to yourself please......This is a hard enough decision as it is.


A couple of my wife's coworkers have done it. You'll have to drink some kind of special protein shake every day, for the rest of your days, and take some kind of supplemental pills as well.

But...they each have dropped stupid amounts of weight, like 100lbs +.

If you're that far behind the curve and can't spend all day at the gym and hire a nutritionist, it's a viable option.

Good luck!
Link Posted: 2/15/2012 7:21:34 AM EDT
My dad had the surgery. He had lots of sports injuries (and subsequent surgeries) when he was younger so his knees and shoulders were pretty much shot, working out wasn't a realistic option.

I think in total he lost about 230 pounds. He's since gained about 20 of it back. But he is a lot more mobile and active now and the doctors say that he probably added 15 years to his life. I'd say go for it.

The recovery will suck and the lifestyle change will take some getting used to, but you'll be so much better off in the long run. Good luck!
Link Posted: 2/15/2012 7:25:51 AM EDT
Check your PM
Link Posted: 2/15/2012 7:27:06 AM EDT
I've had a full hip replacement and blown out both shoulders multiple times
(full on open rotator cuff repairs w/ multiple anchors) already. While they
"work" and function physiologically correctly, I cant push them like when
I was younger making adequate cardio damn near impossible....
Link Posted: 2/15/2012 7:32:29 AM EDT
Even the surgery will fail unless you make the lifestyle modifications that would fix the problem anyhow.



__________________________________________________________________
Cross-platform gun database/electronic bound book (v1.3.2) (and the original thread).
«nolite confidere in principibus, in filiis hominum quibus non est salus»
Link Posted: 2/15/2012 7:36:06 AM EDT

Originally Posted By tc2k11:
Even the surgery will fail unless you make the lifestyle modifications that would fix the problem anyhow.




WINNAR
Link Posted: 2/15/2012 7:36:17 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Zoomer302:
I've had a full hip replacement and blown out both shoulders multiple times
(full on open rotator cuff repairs w/ multiple anchors) already. While they
"work" and function physiologically correctly, I cant push them like when
I was younger making adequate cardio damn near impossible....




Weight loss is 90% diet.

If you just don't have the willpower and honestly think it's the surgery or an early death, then do what you have to do.

Either way, as said above, you will need to make drastic changes to your lifestyle.

Why not do it on your own terms?
Link Posted: 2/15/2012 7:38:29 AM EDT
There's a middle option called the gastric sleeve which you might look into, too. The side effects aren't as radical as with a gastric bypass. The weight loss isn't quite as dramatic either, but still quite good.

Even with weight loss surgery, it is still possible to gain weight. It is a tool, not magic. If you don't do the work and don't control your diet, you may well end up back at square one.
Link Posted: 2/15/2012 7:42:39 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/15/2012 7:43:10 AM EDT by soccermike7]
read this book first.

Why We Get Fat


seriously.
Link Posted: 2/15/2012 8:21:16 AM EDT
It seems to me to be an exceptionally expensive and very risky way to get someone to eat less.

I presume that you have explored every alternative and are fully cognizant of the fact that there might be some unpleasant aftereffects.

I wish you the best of luck.

Link Posted: 2/15/2012 8:24:37 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Ghetto:
Eat less move more.

I'm 36 and have dropped almost 40lbs in 10 weeks. Surgery is for quitters.



Let us know when you've kept it off for five years. Losing is fairly easy. Keeping it off is damn hard.
Link Posted: 2/15/2012 8:30:08 AM EDT
If all else has failed and you need that weight off or face serious health issues, go for it. I am not a fan of Gastric Bypass, but for some, it is a legit option and it might just be in your case.

Also look into what is called a "Lap Band:. It is similar to Gastric Bypass, but instead of them hacking you up, it is a removable band they put in. Far less invasive and fully reversable.

And yes, get ready to change everything you do with your eating/drinking habits. You are going to have to eat slow as hell with very small portions, for example or face what is called "Dumping". Look it up.
Link Posted: 2/15/2012 8:30:30 AM EDT
Read all of my posts in this thread: http://www.ar15.com/forums/t_10_17/654361_.html

IMO, it's treating symptoms but not the underlying problem.
Link Posted: 2/15/2012 8:31:20 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/15/2012 8:33:05 AM EDT by VoodooChile]
I had 2 people from work last year do weight loss surgery.

One guy went from 320 to 180...started doing Zumba and running 5ks...living happily ever after


One girl had a botched surgery ...dropped to 80lbs and a year later is so weak she needs a walker and 15minutes to get to her car....and someone to open the doors for her...not sure what happened but rumor has it the part where her esophagus leads to her stomach was messed up and she couldn't get food through and was too weak to get it fixed. She wasn't even that big to begin with (5ft tall and probably 170-180lbs) With some diet and gym time she could have had the body of a fitness model by now
Link Posted: 2/15/2012 8:34:09 AM EDT
Good for you! Admitting that a change is necessary is a big step. Do you have the willpower to take care of business the old fashion way? If not, then the surgery may indeed be your only choice.

I had an old boss that had it (don't know the details) and it has helped a lot, but it sure did suck for him. Food was his thing, and not being able to pound it down was an issue. The last time I saw him he was still heavy, but not a land whale any longer.

Ultimately, if one gets the surgery as the easy way out, they will fail in the long term. A change in diet/exercise is critical to EVERYBODY's long term health and weight management. We are built for lean times, but live in a time of plenty.
Link Posted: 2/15/2012 8:57:13 AM EDT
Compare Gastric Bypass to Gastric Sleeve. The sleeve works just as well, has less complications, and had a MUCH LOWER rate of regaining weight. A friend of mine had the sleeve and I looked at all kinds of research for him. I do not remember the exact number, but almost 50% or 60% of bypass patients had regained their weight in 5 years. I was dumbfounded. When comparing them side to side with time to loose weight, complications, chance of regaining, etc. there is no comparison at all and the sleeve wins out.
Link Posted: 2/15/2012 8:59:55 AM EDT
Also, as said here you do have to change your lifestyle. My friend went from 370 to 270 in about 8 months. He has held in the 265 range for the past year. Without exercise and better dietary choices he is not going to get below that.
Link Posted: 2/15/2012 9:01:48 AM EDT
Also, as said here you do have to change your lifestyle. My friend went from 370 to 270 in about 8 months. He has held in the 265 range for the past year. Without exercise and better dietary choices he is not going to get below that.
Link Posted: 2/15/2012 9:04:04 AM EDT
My wife's cousin just had the surgery and has been in the hospital in a coma for like 2 months. He may never recover. I wold never have this surgery. There has to be another way, go out and find what works for you.
Link Posted: 2/15/2012 9:07:14 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Zoomer302:

Anyone have any experience with this?

It's not a hard decision. Family member did it recently.

If you do your homework, you'll see complications are quite rare these days.

Just do it and get on with your life.

I'm not going to say it's quick and painless and life will be wonderful after...

But you're making a bigger deal out of it than you need to, and your life WILL be better after.

You'll be able to change your life.

You will change your life because it will make you.

And that isn't a bad thing.


Link Posted: 2/15/2012 9:22:48 AM EDT
My mother had it done 7 years ago. I also have five other friends who have had it done. My mom is the only true success story of the bunch.
When it comes down to it, if you don't go through the councelling and make life altering decisions you will eventually go back to your old eating habits, and over a period of time gain most if not all your weight back.
My mom says it has been harder than any diet she was ever on when she was fat, but she is hard headed and determined not to waste the pain and suffering she went through.

All five friends who had the surgery have gained most if not all of their weight back. None of them went to councilling or group before or after their surgery. My mom attributes alot of her success to this being a requirement through her insurance.

Mom was 5' tall 310lbs at her biggest. At her 1 year mark she was 135lbs. She got down to 110lbs. but did not look good. She has hovered around 130lbs. since. All weight related health problems are gone.

Good luck.
If you have any other questions pm me and i'll ask mom.
Link Posted: 2/15/2012 9:28:22 AM EDT
Originally Posted By thumper10mm:
My mother had it done 7 years ago. I also have five other friends who have had it done. My mom is the only true success story of the bunch.
When it comes down to it, if you don't go through the councelling and make life altering decisions you will eventually go back to your old eating habits, and over a period of time gain most if not all your weight back.
My mom says it has been harder than any diet she was ever on when she was fat, but she is hard headed and determined not to waste the pain and suffering she went through.

All five friends who had the surgery have gained most if not all of their weight back. None of them went to councilling or group before or after their surgery. My mom attributes alot of her success to this being a requirement through her insurance.

Mom was 5' tall 310lbs at her biggest. At her 1 year mark she was 135lbs. She got down to 110lbs. but did not look good. She has hovered around 130lbs. since. All weight related health problems are gone.

Good luck.
If you have any other questions pm me and i'll ask mom.


Precisely why I tell people that if you change your habits and addictions in the first place, you will take care of the whole source of the problem in the first place.

You can change your habits, break the addiction, and lose weight, or you can get the surgery, still have to change your habits and break the addiction and lose weight. If you surround yourself with legit, no-BS accountability by people who care about you, aggressively fight against putting yourself in compromising situations, and have a burning desire to get healthy and change your life, you will absolutely accomplish those goals.

Link Posted: 2/15/2012 9:37:35 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Zoomer302: Keep the "Eat more salad,
train harder, run farther, step away from the buffet, stop eating gummy bear"
comments to yourself please......This is a hard enough decision as it is.


I wish you luck though if you don't want to take the advice ,the surgery will only a temp fix.
Link Posted: 2/15/2012 9:48:31 AM EDT
It IS still a risky surgery and those that refuse to believe it are fooling themselves. I had a client that needed to lose 300 lbs. and blamed it on genetics,glands, you name it. He had the surgery and was dead in less than 24 hours. If they are not able to stabilize your electrolytes, you are toast. If your joints are giving out, maybe it's because you are carrying way too much weight. Might be wrong and I apologize if I am, but you make it sound like your weight problem is do to injuries (someone else's fault).
Link Posted: 2/15/2012 11:11:38 AM EDT
Originally Posted By woob44:
My dad had the surgery. He had lots of sports injuries (and subsequent surgeries) when he was younger so his knees and shoulders were pretty much shot, working out wasn't a realistic option.

I think in total he lost about 230 pounds. He's since gained about 20 of it back. But he is a lot more mobile and active now and the doctors say that he probably added 15 years to his life. I'd say go for it.

The recovery will suck and the lifestyle change will take some getting used to, but you'll be so much better off in the long run. Good luck!


This. I see people occasionally w/ my work. It's hit or miss if they can keep to their diets - a lot of them "out-eat" their pouch. But, yeah, lots of lifestyle changes, including bad complications if it's botched. Not exactly an easy surgery ...
Link Posted: 2/15/2012 11:16:21 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/15/2012 11:18:46 AM EDT by WS4LIF]
Do the "Sleeve", my wife has the "band" and her friend came over last night with the "sleeve"....it's the way to go. The band is ok, but my wife had to have it removed and reinstalled twice last year....ugh.

NO ONE does gastric bypass any more....it's TERRBILE for you.
Link Posted: 2/15/2012 11:18:24 AM EDT
Originally Posted By JB55:
It IS still a risky surgery and those that refuse to believe it are fooling themselves. I had a client that needed to lose 300 lbs. and blamed it on genetics,glands, you name it. He had the surgery and was dead in less than 24 hours. If they are not able to stabilize your electrolytes, you are toast. If your joints are giving out, maybe it's because you are carrying way too much weight. Might be wrong and I apologize if I am, but you make it sound like your weight problem is do to injuries (someone else's fault).


Yup. A guy at my old office went in to have this done. He never came back. Died of an infection I think. All surgery is risky and should not be taken lightly. I'm glad I wasn't the guy that passed off the box of his belongings to his wife when she came in. Sad.

Link Posted: 2/15/2012 11:45:16 AM EDT
After reading all the comments and thinking about it, I think you should do all the post-op shit (counseling, behavioral therapy, lifestyle changes, etc) before you say "yes" to the surgery.

I think the folks who say that without all that you will ultimately not prevail, are probably right.

Just make sure you are not taking the "easy" way out, because as you can see from reading here, it isn't magic. Like everything else in life, it depends on your choices.
Link Posted: 2/15/2012 11:52:42 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/15/2012 11:59:19 AM EDT by John_Wayne777]
Link Posted: 2/15/2012 12:34:25 PM EDT
With any surgery, there is always a significant risk of problems, including death.

Why not just change your diet? Post it here (or better yet, in the fitness forum) and lots of people will help you out with it.

To me, having extreme surgery to address an eating problem is taking a shortcut. Shortcuts usually wind up fucking things up eventually.

Personally, I would be worried about the long term effects of this surgery.

Link Posted: 2/15/2012 12:38:03 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Zoomer302:
I've had a full hip replacement and blown out both shoulders multiple times
(full on open rotator cuff repairs w/ multiple anchors) already. While they
"work" and function physiologically correctly, I cant push them like when
I was younger making adequate cardio damn near impossible....


Body composition is 80% diet. Eat a Paleo/Primal diet, and they weight will probably fall off pretty quickly, and other health markers will improve.
Link Posted: 2/15/2012 12:51:07 PM EDT
not sure of the exact numbers on complications, but I remember hearing something like this:
" those with complications have a 50% mortality rate" with bypass or rouen y bypass. If you do it, research the surgeon to the n th degree.
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