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Posted: 8/30/2005 1:04:06 PM EDT
HOLY SHIT


www.msnbc.msn.com/id/9130254/



MSNBC staff and news service reports
Updated: 4:50 p.m. ET Aug. 30, 2005

NEW ORLEANS - With water rising in the streets of New Orleans and conditions rapidly deteriorating, Gov. Kathleen Blanco said Tuesday that the tens of thousands of people now huddled in the Superdome and other rescue centers would have to be evacuated.

“The situation is untenable,” Blanco said at a news conference. “It’s just heartbreaking.”

Because of two levees that broke Tuesday, the city was rapidly filling with water, the governor said. She also said the power could be out for a long time, and the storm broke a major water main, leaving the city without drinkable water.
Story continues below ↓ advertisement

The evacuation order came amid a swirl of confusion over exactly where the levee breaches were and how long it might take to repair them.

Water began rising in the streets Tuesday morning because of the levee breaks, prompting the evacuation of hotels and at least one hospital. New Orleans lies mostly below sea level and is protected by a network of pumps, canals and levees, but many of the pumps were not working Tuesday morning.

By 4 p.m. ET Tuesday, there had been no official word on just where the breaches were, but the most serious appeared to be "a large section of the vital 17th Street Canal levee, where it connects to the brand new 'hurricane proof' Old Hammond Highway bridge," according to the New Orleans Times-Picayune.

"The breach sent a churning sea of water from Lake Pontchartrain coursing across Lakeview and into Mid-City, Carrollton, Gentilly, City Park and neighborhoods farther south and east," the newspaper said.

“There’s a serious leak and it’s causing the water to continue to rise,” New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin confirmed. Adding to the problem were malfunctions in the system the city uses to pump out floodwaters.

Disagreement over problem
While some media accounts quoted unnamed officials as saying they had begun dropping 3,000-pound sandbags into the breach and were confident the problem could be solved within hours, other officials scoffed at that notion.

In one case, representatives from the same agency were quoted in different places directly contradicting each other.

“It’s a very slow rise, and it will remain so until we plug that breach. I think we can get it stabilized in a few hours,” said Terry Ebbert, New Orleans’ homeland security chief.

But Mark Smith, a spokesman with the security office, told the Shreveport (La.) Times, “That breach is not going to be fixed today, tomorrow or the next day.”

So far, Mayor Nagin said, the historic French Quarter and central business district had not been badly flooded.

But Tulane University Medical Center Vice President Karen Troyer-Caraway said the downtown hospital was surrounded by 6 feet of water and officials were considering evacuating its 1,000 patients.

'Whitecaps on Canal Street'
“The water is rising so fast I cannot begin to describe how quickly it’s rising,” she said. “We have whitecaps on Canal Street, the water is moving so fast.”

"No one anticipated this," NBC News' Brian Williams reported earlier, standing knee-deep in floodwaters in the quarter.

The rising waters and failing pumps were thwarting rescuers' efforts to pull hurricane victims to safety and assess the damage, but "many, many reports" of bodies floating in the flood tide made clear the deadly impact on the Crescent City, said Nagin.

"We probably have 80 percent of our city under water," Nagin added, "with some sections of our city the water is as deep as 20 feet. We still have many of our residents on roofs. Both airports are under water."

Television footage showed plenty of other problems for New Orleans, including buildings on fire. And police said they had made a number of arrests for looting.

The developing nature of the disaster made it impossible for officials to give specific accounts of which portions of the city were flooded, but aerial video showed standing water and destruction literally everywhere.

'A lot of people awaiting rescue'
"All I know is when my people go out, they tell me there are a lot of people awaiting rescue. I hear there are hundreds of people still on their rooftops," said Gen. Ralph Lupin, commander of National Guard troops at the Superdome in New Orleans, where some 10,000 people had taken shelter.

Eighty percent of the city's 485,000 residents had heeded orders to evacuate the city before the storm hit.

Federal Emergency Management Agency Michael Brown said "it’s going to be weeks at least before people can get back" to their homes and business in New Orleans.

And when they do return, "it’s going to be incredibly dangerous" because of structural damage to homes, diseases from animal carcasses and chemicals in homes, he said.

Two kinds of levees
As officials tried to inspect the damage to the levees, Lt. Gen. Robert Flowers, the retired chief of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, explained the "very extensive" system to MSNBC viewers.

He said that New Orleans has two types of levees: one set holds the water back from the Mississippi River; the others provide protection from Lake Pontchartrain when it swells during hurricanes and other storms. Flowers said that he noticed in his time with the Corp that development and loss of wetlands along Louisiana's coast had cost New Orleans a lot of "natural hurricane protection."

As to clearing the floodwaters amid the broken levees, Flowers explained that "some pumping can be done while those levees are being repaired." However, "This is a tough one. They're in for a long, hard pull in recovering from Katrina."

Link Posted: 8/30/2005 1:05:11 PM EDT
FEMA just called this the worst natural disaster to hit the US. My prayers go out.

Fox reporting 30+ ppl in one APT complex died.

How do non-religious people deal with this?
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 1:05:49 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/30/2005 1:06:31 PM EDT by npd233]
Hope they get out quick otherwise someone's going to need
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 1:06:35 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/30/2005 1:07:41 PM EDT by crazyhorse705]
yeah their saying in mississippi flooding is going 6 miles inland god how many did we really lose.

national guard is moving as fast as they can but it may not be fast enough.

this may turn into a nightmare in turns of deathtoll.
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 1:07:08 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 1:07:19 PM EDT
Well, maybe that will take care of the looters that the cops let go.
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 1:07:33 PM EDT

Originally Posted By chapperjoe:
FEMA just called this the worst natural disaster to hit the US. My prayers go out.

Fox reporting 30+ ppl in one APT complex died.

How do non-religious people deal with this?



How do religious people deal with the lose of non-religious ( read-unsaved) loved ones
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 1:08:47 PM EDT
Damn, just damn... I knew that if New Orleans ever got a cat 3+ up the pipe, they would be in serious doggy doo...

I can't imagine... It would be similar if a cat 3+ came up galveston bay, the entire Galveston County/ Clear Lake area (where I live, 1,000,000+ people) would be underwater.

These people have my deepest sympathy...

- AG
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 1:09:21 PM EDT

Originally Posted By chapperjoe:
FEMA just called this the worst natural disaster to hit the US. My prayers go out.

Fox reporting 30+ ppl in one APT complex died.

How do non-religious people deal with this?



How do religious people deal with this?

That is a dumb thing to say.
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 1:09:42 PM EDT
This ain't over by a long shot.
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 1:10:32 PM EDT
yeah this is some scary shit

but this is going to go down in history as the biggest disaster we have ever seen. much bigger than 9/11/01 and that is saying something.
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 1:10:32 PM EDT
I was watching one of the live internet broadcasts and the mayor and governor said that electrical power won't be back for at 4-6 weeks. That is a long-time, and the lake that is righ next door with the broken levee, is just going to drain into the city unabated.
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 1:10:46 PM EDT

Originally Posted By chapperjoe:
FEMA just called this the worst natural disaster to hit the US. My prayers go out.

Fox reporting 30+ ppl in one APT complex died.

How do non-religious people deal with this?



What do you mean? At least they don't have to try to reconcile these events with a 'loving, all-powerful being'.
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 1:10:54 PM EDT
This sucks shit!



I just heard a report about all of my relatives who evaced southern new orleans.

Guess where they went ... to stay with another relative in souther MS.

Haven't heard anything since then.


Link Posted: 8/30/2005 1:11:12 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/30/2005 1:14:19 PM EDT by phatmax]
Well.....looks like the 28 foot storm surge was not needed to sink the city.

ETA, this does suck , but they are lucky it is happening after the storm is gone.
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 1:11:32 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 1:12:23 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/30/2005 1:13:32 PM EDT by warlord]

Originally Posted By crazyhorse705:
yeah this is some scary shit

but this is going to go down in history as the biggest disaster we have ever seen. much bigger than 9/11/01 and that is saying something.


The WTC/Pentagon attack was a man-made disaster, which pretty much pale in comparision to the natural ones. Would it be fair to think of this disaster as the devastation of Hurricanes Andrew and Camille combined?
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 1:12:24 PM EDT

Originally Posted By chapperjoe:

How do non-religious people deal with this?




Wow, way to take a downer thread even more downhill.

Might as well say it--IBTL.
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 1:13:25 PM EDT

Originally Posted By crazyhorse705:
yeah this is some scary shit

but this is going to go down in history as the biggest disaster we have ever seen. much bigger than 9/11/01 and that is saying something.


The Galveston hurricane of 1900 killed over 6,000 people. That said, this most likely will turn out to be the most expensive disaster in our history.
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 1:14:12 PM EDT
when the second levee broke new orleans went with it. and if im reading right there is 10,000 to 20,000 people at the super dome this may turn in to a major rescue mission for the helos.
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 1:15:10 PM EDT

Originally Posted By crazyhorse705:
when the second levee broke new orleans went with it. and if im reading right there is 10,000 to 20,000 people at the super dome this may turn in to a major rescue mission for the helos.



Not enough helos in the southeast to do that, it is going to be boats, airboats or even Marine hovercraft.
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 1:15:36 PM EDT
Damn.
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 1:15:41 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Echo_Hotel:

Originally Posted By crazyhorse705:
yeah this is some scary shit

but this is going to go down in history as the biggest disaster we have ever seen. much bigger than 9/11/01 and that is saying something.


The Galveston hurricane of 1900 killed over 6,000 people. That said, this most likely will turn out to be the most expensive disaster in our history.



im saying as in modern times from 1960 to now.
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 1:19:39 PM EDT
here is another part of it from abcnews


abcnews.go.com/Technology/HurricaneKatrina/wireStory?id=1081091


Water Continues to Rise on New Orleans Streets As Rescuers Struggle to Reach Katrina Victims

GULFPORT, Miss. Aug 30, 2005 — Rescuers in boats and helicopters struggled to reach hundreds of wet and bedraggled victims of Hurricane Katrina along the Gulf Coast on Tuesday, while New Orleans slipped deeper into crisis as water began rising in the streets because of a levee break.

The magnitude of the disaster and the death toll in particular became clearer with every tale of misery. Mississippi's governor said the number of dead in one county alone could be as high as 80.

"At first light, the devastation is greater than our worst fears. It's just totally overwhelming," Louisiana Gov. Kathleen Blanco said the morning after Katrina howled ashore with winds of 145 mph and engulfed thousands of homes in one of the most punishing storms on record in the United States.

In New Orleans, water began rising in the streets Tuesday morning, swamping an estimated 80 percent of the city and prompting the evacuation of hotels and hospitals. The water was also rising perilously inside New Orleans' Superdome, and Blanco said the tens of thousands of people now huddled there and other shelters would have to be evacuated as well.

"The situation is untenable," Blanco said at a news conference. "It's just heartbreaking."

Because of two levees that broke Tuesday, the city was rapidly filling with water, the governor said. She also said the power could be out for a long time, and the storm broke a major water main, leaving the city without drinkable water. Also, looting broke out in some neighborhoods.

New Orleans lies mostly below sea level and is protected by a network of pumps, canals and levees. Officials began using helicopters to drop 3,000-pound sandbags onto one of the levees, hoping to close the breach.

All day, rescuers were also seen using helicopters to drop lifelines to victims and pluck them from the roofs of homes cut off by floodwaters. The Coast Guard said it rescued some 1,200 people.

New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin said hundreds, if not thousands, of people may still be stuck on roofs roofs and in attics, and so rescue boats were bypassing the dead.

"We're not even dealing with dead bodies," Nagin said. "They're just pushing them on the side."

National Guardsmen brought in people from outlying areas to New Orleans' Superdome in the backs of big 2 1/2-ton Army trucks. Louisiana's wildlife enforcement department also brought people in on the backs of their pickups. Some were wet, some were in wheelchairs, some were holding babies and nothing else.

Nevertheless, it was clear the death toll would rise sharply, with one survivor after another telling of friends and loved ones who floated off or disappeared as the floodwaters rose around them.

"I talked with paramedics that are on the scene and the devastation is so great that they won't quit counting (bodies) for a while," said Mark Williams, operations supervisor for an ambulance service along the Mississippi coast.

Along the coast, tree trunks, downed power lines and trees, and chunks of broken concrete in the streets prevented rescuers from reaching victims. Swirling water in many areas contained hidden dangers. Crews worked to clear highways. Along one Mississippi highway, motorists themselves used chainsaws to remove trees blocking the road.

Tens of thousands of people will need shelter for weeks if not months, said Mike Brown, director of the Federal Emergency Management Agency. And once the floodwaters go down, "it's going to be incredibly dangerous" because of structural damage to homes, diseases from animal carcasses and chemicals in homes, he said.

An estimated 40,000 people were in American Red Cross shelters along the Gulf Coast.

Officials warned people against trying to return to their homes, saying that would only interfere with the rescue and recovery efforts.

Looting broke out in Biloxi and in New Orleans, in some cases in full view of police and National Guardsmen. On New Orleans' Canal Street, the main thoroughfare in the central business district, looters sloshed through hip-deep water and ripped open the steel gates on the front of several clothing and jewelry stores.

More than 1,600 Mississippi National Guardsmen were activated to help with the recovery, and the Alabama Guard sent 800 of its soldiers to Mississippi as well.

In New Orleans, a city of 480,000 that was mostly evacuated over the weekend as Katrina closed in, those who stayed behind faced another, delayed threat: rising water. Failed pumps and levees apparently sent water from Lake Pontchartrain coursing through the streets.

The rising water forced one New Orleans hospital to move patients to the Superdome, where some 10,000 people had taken shelter, and prompted the staff of New Orleans' Times-Picayune newspaper to abandon its offices, authorities said. Hotels were evacuated as well as the water kept rising.

Downtown streets that were relatively clear in the hours after the storm were filled with 1 to 1 1/2 feet of water Tuesday morning. Water was knee-deep around the Superdome. Canal Street was literally a canal. Water lapped at the edge of the French Quarter. Clumps of red ants floated in the gasoline-fouled waters downtown.

"It's a very slow rise, and it will remain so until we plug that breach. I think we can get it stabilized in a few hours," said Terry Ebbert, New Orleans' homeland security chief.

Gov. Haley Barbour of Mississippi said there were unconfirmed reports of up to 80 deaths in Harrison County which includes devastated Gulfport and Biloxi and the number was likely to rise. An untold number of people were also feared dead in Louisiana. At least five other deaths across the Gulf Coast were blamed on Katrina.

"We know that there is a lot of the coast that we have not been able to get to," Barbour said on NBC's "Today Show." "I hate to say it, but it looks like it is a very bad disaster in terms of human life."

As for the death toll in Louisiana, Blanco said only: "We have no counts whatsoever, but we know many lives have been lost."

At the Superdome, someone died after plunging from an upper level of the stadium, Ebbert said. He said the person probably jumped.

The biggest known cluster of deaths was at the Quiet Water Beach apartments in Biloxi, a red-brick beachfront complex of about 100 units. Harrison County, Miss., emergency operations center spokesman Jim Pollard said about 30 people died there.

"This is our tsunami," Mayor A. J. Holloway of Biloxi, Miss., told The Biloxi Sun Herald.

Joy Schovest, 55, was in the apartment complex with her boyfriend, Joe Calvin, when the water began rising. They stayed despite a mandatory evacuation order.

"The water got higher and higher," she said, breaking into tears. "It pushed all the doors open and we swam out. We grabbed a lady and pulled her out the window and then we swam with the current. It was terrifying. You should have seen the cars floating around us. We had to push them away when we were trying to swim."

Teresa Kavanagh, 35, of Biloxi, shook her head is disbelief as she took photographs of the damage in her hometown.

"Total devastation. Apartment complexes are wiped clean. We're going to rebuild, but it's going to take long time. Houses that withstood Camille are nothing but slab now," she said. Hurricane Camille killed 256 people in Louisiana and Mississippi in 1969.

The hurricane knocked out power to millions of people from Louisiana to the Florida Panhandle, and authorities said it could be two months before electricity is restored to everyone.

Oil prices jumped by more than $3 a barrel on Tuesday, climbing above $70 a barrel, amid uncertainty about the extent of the damage to the Gulf region's refineries and drilling platforms.



By midday Tuesday, Katrina was downgraded to a tropical depression, with winds around 35 mph. It was moving northeast through Tennessee at around 21 mph.

Forecasters said that as the storm moves north over the next few days, it could swamp the Tennessee and Ohio valleys with a potentially ruinous 8 inches or more of rain. On Monday, Katrina's remnants spun off tornadoes and other storms in Georgia that smashed dozens of buildings and were blamed for at least one death.

According to preliminary assessments by AIR Worldwide Corp., a risk assessment company, the insurance industry faces as much as $26 billion in claims from Katrina. That would make Katrina more expensive than the previous record-setting storm, Hurricane Andrew, which caused some $21 billion in insured losses in 1992 to property in Florida and along the Gulf Coast.

Mike Spencer of Gulfport made the mistake of trying to ride out the storm in his house. He told NBC that he used his grandson's little surfboard to make his way around the house as the water rose around him.

Finally, he said, "as the house just filled up with water, it forced me into the attic, and then I ended up kicking out the wall and climbing up to a tree because the houses around me were just disappearing."

He said he wrapped himself around a tree branch and waited four or five hours.

Anne Anderson said she lost her family home in Gulfport.

"My family's an old Mississippi family. I had antiques, 150 years old or more, they're all gone. We have just basically a slab," she told NBC. She added: "Behind us we have a beautiful sunrise and sunset, and that is going to be what I'm going to miss the most, sitting on the porch watching those."

Associated Press reporters Mary Foster, Allen G. Breed, Brett Martel, Adam Nossiter and Jay Reeves contributed to this report.
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 1:19:53 PM EDT
Wow...
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 1:22:29 PM EDT
Best thing they can do is evacuate the city to help curtail the looting that's going on.
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 1:23:47 PM EDT

Originally Posted By crazyhorse705:

Originally Posted By Echo_Hotel:

Originally Posted By crazyhorse705:
yeah this is some scary shit

but this is going to go down in history as the biggest disaster we have ever seen. much bigger than 9/11/01 and that is saying something.


The Galveston hurricane of 1900 killed over 6,000 people. That said, this most likely will turn out to be the most expensive disaster in our history.



im saying as in modern times from 1960 to now.



Economic & social impact of 9/11 was greater - Katrina won't change laws (Patriot Act) or drive industries into bankruptcy (airlines, among others) or propel us into a war.

Not making light of the disater, just keeping things in perspective.
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 1:24:07 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Bama-Shooter:
Best thing they can do is evacuate the city to help curtail the looting that's going on.



If the water keeps rising there won't be much left to loot w/o SCUBA gear.
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 1:24:24 PM EDT
My prayers go to them.
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 1:24:32 PM EDT
"No one anticipated this," NBC News' Brian Williams reported earlier, standing knee-deep in floodwaters in the quarter.

Really? Who woulda thunk that no one in New Orleans or the government would have planned for the possibility of a Cat.4 storm htting a city below the sea? Un-believable at the idiocy now. Make decisions on what is going on right now, evacuate everyone, I mean everyone. Drain Lake New Orleans, clean up lake New Orleans then figure out how to re-build Lake New Orleans. There will not be anyone living in Lake New Orleans for months...do what needs to be done now. It's almost like they are so stunned, they cannot act or react to the obvious decisions.
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 1:25:06 PM EDT
What really sucks is the heaviest part of the hurricane season is just beginning. Damn.
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 1:25:52 PM EDT
This sucks.
I hate seeing this shit happen to my country.
I dont like it happening to anyone, but this hits home.
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 1:26:15 PM EDT

Originally Posted By CeramicGod:

Originally Posted By chapperjoe:
FEMA just called this the worst natural disaster to hit the US. My prayers go out.

Fox reporting 30+ ppl in one APT complex died.

How do non-religious people deal with this?



How do religious people deal with this?

That is a dumb thing to say.



That is what I was thinking. Why would God allow such a thing?
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 1:27:33 PM EDT
Officials quoted that there are 60,000 in the Superdome now.
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 1:29:27 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/30/2005 1:30:38 PM EDT by chapperjoe]

Originally Posted By CeramicGod:

Originally Posted By chapperjoe:
FEMA just called this the worst natural disaster to hit the US. My prayers go out.

Fox reporting 30+ ppl in one APT complex died.

How do non-religious people deal with this?



How do religious people deal with this?

That is a dumb thing to say.




huh? I don't get the controversy. Religious people know that there's a reason for everything that we may or may not know. that's it. What do non-religious people say? " It's the weather" ?
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 1:30:56 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/30/2005 1:32:06 PM EDT by crazyhorse705]

Originally Posted By THR-Thumper:
Officials quoted that there are 60,000 in the Superdome now.



and i saw a pic of the water going closer and closer to the dome. i will see if i can find it.

so you mean the dome in front of the military trucks this could be interesting.this is a pic from cnn


Link Posted: 8/30/2005 1:32:31 PM EDT
Various Air Ambulance programs (including the one I fly for) are on standby to fly into South Louisiana in order to evac patients from the New Orleans hospitals that are flooding out.

I'm fixed wing so I won't get close to New Orleans but I hope we get the chance to help.

At the ready...

Flyer
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 1:33:17 PM EDT

Originally Posted By chapperjoe:

Originally Posted By CeramicGod:

Originally Posted By chapperjoe:
FEMA just called this the worst natural disaster to hit the US. My prayers go out.

Fox reporting 30+ ppl in one APT complex died.

How do non-religious people deal with this?



How do religious people deal with this?

That is a dumb thing to say.




huh? I don't get the controversy. Religious people know that there's a reason for everything that we may or may not know. that's it. What do non-religious people say? " It's the weather" ?




yes.

How do you deal with "worshiping" something that supposedly caused this.


"thank god that god only hit us with a cat 4 storm instead of a cat 5"
=
"thank the guy who raped your sister that he didn't shoot her too"



Link Posted: 8/30/2005 1:38:16 PM EDT

Originally Posted By chapperjoe:
FEMA just called this the worst natural disaster to hit the US. My prayers go out.

Fox reporting 30+ ppl in one APT complex died.

How do non-religious people deal with this?hr


Umm we pick ourselves up and move on.
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 1:38:34 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 1:39:44 PM EDT

Originally Posted By chapperjoe:

Originally Posted By CeramicGod:

Originally Posted By chapperjoe:
FEMA just called this the worst natural disaster to hit the US. My prayers go out.

Fox reporting 30+ ppl in one APT complex died.

How do non-religious people deal with this?



How do religious people deal with this?

That is a dumb thing to say.




huh? I don't get the controversy. Religious people know that there's a reason for everything that we may or may not know. that's it. What do non-religious people say? " It's the weather" ?



You say "God makes shit happen" and that is somehow more satisfying than "shit happens"?

Any God who would allow this to happen isn't worthy of worship.

Omniscient, Omnipotent, Omnibenevolent. Pick two.

Link Posted: 8/30/2005 1:40:53 PM EDT
Who does a non-religious person deal with it?

Bad things happen all the time, good things happen as well. It is called life. I just deal with it.
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 1:42:41 PM EDT

Originally Posted By chapperjoe:
FEMA just called this the worst natural disaster to hit the US. My prayers go out.

Fox reporting 30+ ppl in one APT complex died.

How do non-religious people deal with this?

i was thinking along the same lines....seems this could possibly be the death blow to New Orleans? think of the time and money it'll take to rebuild it.
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 1:46:04 PM EDT
These things happen in life to strenghten those who survive. God put us here to prove that we can withstand all that is put before us, and still remain honest good people. These are the times we need to show compassion and sacrifice our time and come together to help.

If you don't believe in god its the same thing. Remain honest, honorable, compassoinate. Thats what our test is through all of this.
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 1:47:48 PM EDT
how high up in the dome can they go if the water keeps rising and how much time do rescuers have to get them out?
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 1:49:34 PM EDT
Respectfully:

Could you guys wishing to continue the religious debate post a new thread in the Religion forum. A lot of people are using ARFCOM (and this thread) as a source of breaking info.

Link Posted: 8/30/2005 1:50:12 PM EDT

Originally Posted By crazyhorse705:
yeah this is some scary shit

but this is going to go down in history as the biggest disaster we have ever seen. much bigger than 9/11/01 and that is saying something.



9/11 wasn't a disaster it was murder of civilians on purpose.

Comparing a natural disaster to an act of mass murder is weird.
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 1:50:15 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Sylvan:
Anyone seen all the liberal's volunteering to go down to N'arlins to help with recovery?
Or is their idea of helping criticizing Bush?

I admit I am cold and heartless.


In times like this its best if we set politics to the side, pull together as a country and get'r done.
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 1:50:22 PM EDT

Originally Posted By crazyhorse705:
how high up in the dome can they go if the water keeps rising and how much time do rescuers have to get them out?



Much higher than the water would ever get. Would be a terrible situation, though.
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 1:52:02 PM EDT
Well, it's easy to be atheistic when you'r life is not 20 feet underwater I guess.
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 1:54:23 PM EDT

Originally Posted By chapperjoe:
Well, it's easy to be atheistic when you'r life is not 20 feet underwater I guess.



Huh? Lifes about cowboying the fuck up. Git on with your life after the hard times roll by. Not pondering "Why did it happen to me???" Booo fucking who.
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