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Posted: 9/20/2004 6:24:51 AM EST
I was at the range last week shooting my Rem 700 in 30-06. I was shooting pretty decent at 100 yards and after about 25 rounds started going for my target at 200. At one point I lost count of how many rounds I had shot and thought that there was still one in the chamber. Right as I pulled the trigger I flinched pretty bad and it was quite obvious because there was no shot to move the rifle, just a flinch. I started noticing it on just about every subsequent shot. I made a conscious effort to control it but I couldn't. I don't know if it was b/c I was loosing focus or what. Is there some kind of tried and true method to eliminate flinch? I don't flinch when I shoot my other guns.
Link Posted: 9/20/2004 6:29:40 AM EST
If you get piss drunk beforehand, you won't have a flinching problem.



Seriously - if you catch yourself doing that just take breaks between shots, deep breaths, calm yourself - do not anticipate the shot. Gently squeeze, slowly - the shot should surprise you.

Link Posted: 9/20/2004 6:32:32 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/20/2004 6:33:07 AM EST by Dolomite]
Dry firing.

And concentrate on what your sight picture looks like right after the hammer strikes.

When you get tird of that - do more dry firing - this time without aiming. Pull the trigger until you're positive one more ounce will set it off, then hold it for awhile, then complete the trigger pull.

When your arms aren't tired anymore, go back to sighted dry firing.

The next time you go to the range, start off with some .22's, then dry fire your 700 a few times before loading it.
Link Posted: 9/20/2004 6:33:16 AM EST
Link Posted: 9/20/2004 6:33:52 AM EST
Does 25 rounds sound like a small # of rounds for someone to loose focus after? Like I said, I was shooting great (well, it was only at 100 yards so maybe I was flinching there too just didn't notice) then I just couldn't seem to hold my focus well.
Link Posted: 9/20/2004 6:35:36 AM EST
the problem I have with dry firing is that I know there is no round to be shot in there. I don't see how that would work, i guess I'll try it. Wish dry firing wasn't so damn boring.
Link Posted: 9/20/2004 6:37:48 AM EST

Originally Posted By Dolomite:
Dry firing.

And concentrate on what your sight picture looks like right after the hammer strikes.

When you get tird of that - do more dry firing - this time without aiming. Pull the trigger until you're positive one more ounce will set it off, then hold it for awhile, then complete the trigger pull.

When your arms aren't tired anymore, go back to sighted dry firing.

The next time you go to the range, start off with some .22's, then dry fire your 700 a few times before loading it.



The rifle recoils way too much to have the same sight picture after the shot as before. If I look through the scope it has usually ended up way to the right (thats where it seems to land after the recoil. I'm shooting from a bench and a bipod if that matters at all.
Link Posted: 9/20/2004 6:41:32 AM EST
Link Posted: 9/20/2004 6:49:14 AM EST


This'll cure what ails you. Now knock it off.
Link Posted: 9/20/2004 6:52:15 AM EST
You know the problem (knowing is half the battle, and all that), and you know the answer. Just do it.

Link Posted: 9/20/2004 6:53:35 AM EST

Originally Posted By TopCrest:
www.mychemist.com.au/images/vagisil.jpg

This'll cure what ails you. Now knock it off.





daaaaaamn!

i was having that problem with my 1911... i was able to cure it with the ol "frontsight, press"...

Link Posted: 9/20/2004 7:05:19 AM EST

Originally Posted By TopCrest:
www.mychemist.com.au/images/vagisil.jpg

This'll cure what ails you. Now knock it off.



i knew it was matter of when and not if.
Link Posted: 9/20/2004 7:15:32 AM EST

Originally Posted By DocBrooks:

Originally Posted By TopCrest:
www.mychemist.com.au/images/vagisil.jpg

This'll cure what ails you. Now knock it off.



i knew it was matter of when and not if.




On here ? Ohhhh yeah, hahaha

Link Posted: 9/20/2004 5:33:43 PM EST
Try it again when you feel more rested,and dry fireing just means that when you fire you are lined up and not knowing when the rifle goes off!!

If you keep getting these same responces then you have experenced the Peter principle(when a man reaches his own level of incompatense) and you need to chamber down to what you can hit with!

There are many rifle rounds with as much and more ballistic capabilitys than the 30/06 that just don't have the recoil!!!

It may be the rifle stock(design) that delivers the impact to your shoulder that makes you flinch!!

Maybe a shooters padded jacket would be all you need!!

Experiment!!!


Bob
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