Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login

Site Notices
Posted: 5/4/2004 1:44:16 PM EST

This is a project I did for one of my classes-


Here is the back end of it. At this point, it is essentially a rectangular box. Whereas most normal people would have done as little welding as possible, I did as much as I could (and all with SMAW, or stick) because it was for a welding class.


This is the front, still in the early stages. I put my hat in there for size reference. I got the steel for free, so I was able to make it as large as I wanted.


About two weeks later (working on it about two days a week), I have a finished product. This is the side of it. I tacked on the steel garnish on the edges (also built from scratch) with the MIG welder. It was kinda cheating because this was supposed to be a stick welding project, but my professor gave me some leeway here- making spot welds with an arc welder is a bear (especially for me, I'm a newbie).


Here's the front of the safe. All hinges (and hinge pins) welded for security. The lock, I'm told, is un-pickable.


I painted it with Krylon "hammered on" finish, but I'm not too impressed. I was told the "krinkle finish" would look good, but they didn't have it at wally world when I went there to pick up supplies. I'm not too disapointed, but from the texture on the lid of the can I expected more.
Here's the front of the safe opened up. Finished carpeting the inside yesterday, going to turn it in for a grade today.


My original idea was to build it fireproof, a double walled system with 1/4" of sand in between the steel layers, but that probobly wouldn't have been too practical. I'm pleased with the result though.




Link Posted: 5/4/2004 1:45:22 PM EST
good work
Link Posted: 5/4/2004 1:46:26 PM EST
Nice job !
Link Posted: 5/4/2004 1:47:26 PM EST
VERY nice!
Link Posted: 5/4/2004 1:47:53 PM EST
thanks!
Link Posted: 5/4/2004 1:57:47 PM EST
Well done!

Nice to see someone not afraid to try something different!
Link Posted: 5/4/2004 1:57:55 PM EST
A good strong box(which yours is) needs a good strong lock(which yours isn't). I could bust that lock in less than five seconds.

Nice welding though.
Link Posted: 5/4/2004 2:06:53 PM EST
Link Posted: 5/4/2004 2:31:12 PM EST
It's a pretty nice welding project, but if you intend for that box to perform any function other than keeping your kids and nosey house gusets out, you may one day be very disappointed.

I could be inside that thing within a minute using either a long pry bar to bend the door open, or using a large chisel and a 3 lb sledge to knock that "unpickable" lock clean off. Also, the latch on the inside of the lock looks to be mild steel that can be easily bent to pop open the door.
Link Posted: 5/4/2004 2:36:26 PM EST
Impressive.... so when are you going to get to work on my long rifle safe? I want double the thickness and a better lock. So you had better log off and light that torch.
Link Posted: 5/4/2004 2:41:20 PM EST
You have every right to be proud. Very nice job.

Let us know your grade.
Link Posted: 5/4/2004 2:41:43 PM EST
Nice work! Makes me wish I had a useful skill.
Link Posted: 5/4/2004 2:45:32 PM EST
[Last Edit: 5/4/2004 2:46:35 PM EST by DOW]
That's a really nice job - well done! You do need a better lock though.


It sucks when people piss on your parade, doesn't it?



Edited to add that I cannot weld, so lock or no lock you did something I can't. Feel better?
Link Posted: 5/4/2004 3:23:21 PM EST
Nice job! That looks like a fun project.
Link Posted: 5/4/2004 3:33:40 PM EST
nice!
What class was this for?

Hoppy8420
Link Posted: 5/4/2004 4:32:10 PM EST
Very nicely done!

While I generally consider myself pretty handy, you’ll certainly never see me posting any photos of my own welding (actually attempted welding) projects!!

You could have made it fire resistant by using fire resistant plasterboard, which I believe is what’s used in regular gun safes.

Also, if that’s a regular tubular lock, it really isn’t pick proof. Plus, as others have mentioned, the lock mechanism isn’t very strong.

Still, I truly wish I could work as nicely as that!!
Link Posted: 5/4/2004 4:44:18 PM EST
I wanna kick him too, I wanna wanna. Hell I'ld like to be able to weld. and I'm only 50. The last time I did any welding was on a Rose Parade Float when I was in 9th or 10th grade.

So here's a new bitch. No mounting holes. But those aren't too hard to put in when you decide where it is going. Mount with lag screws to studs. Or what I did was use 1"x3/16th" stock pieces Drilled them to match with mounting holes and then tapped, so the bolt head is inside and the bar stock has a bolt through each end so it can't be unthreaded. Then I drilled through the desk top and but the bars under the desk top. So if they can't get it open, they can't take the safe without a major portion of the desk.



But it looks a heck of a lot better than anything my guys came up with in metal shop.
Link Posted: 5/4/2004 4:49:50 PM EST
Sweet.

But why are you keeping your hat in it??

Must be one of them $18 hats.

Link Posted: 5/4/2004 5:13:23 PM EST

Originally Posted By M4Real:
A good strong box(which yours is) needs a good strong lock(which yours isn't). I could bust that lock in less than five seconds.

Nice welding though.



Yeah, that lock is pretty wimpy. A real burglar could bust it in 3 seconds


Impressive.... so when are you going to get to work on my long rifle safe? I want double the thickness and a better lock. So you had better log off and light that torch.


I just burned off one of my eyebrows while trying to light it


Old Painless: You have every right to be proud. Very nice job.

Let us know your grade



Thanks! I just got back from class, got an A on the project and the final!


Hoppy: What class was this for?


Welding class, easy credits and a useful skill for anyone interested (all kinds of people were in my class)- I took mine through the local community college- it was cheap too!

Thanks for the kind words guys.


Link Posted: 5/4/2004 5:25:32 PM EST
[Last Edit: 5/4/2004 5:26:34 PM EST by jsmith48]

Originally Posted By PaDanby:
I wanna kick him too, I wanna wanna. Hell I'ld like to be able to weld. and I'm only 50. The last time I did any welding was on a Rose Parade Float when I was in 9th or 10th grade.

So here's a new bitch. No mounting holes. But those aren't too hard to put in when you decide where it is going. Mount with lag screws to studs. Or what I did was use 1"x3/16th" stock pieces Drilled them to match with mounting holes and then tapped, so the bolt head is inside and the bar stock has a bolt through each end so it can't be unthreaded. Then I drilled through the desk top and but the bars under the desk top. So if they can't get it open, they can't take the safe without a major portion of the desk.

But it looks a heck of a lot better than anything my guys came up with in metal shop.



Great idea- I'll keep this in mind when I finally get out of school and buy myself a house


199: You could have made it fire resistant by using fire resistant plasterboard, which I believe is what’s used in regular gun safes.

Also, if that’s a regular tubular lock, it really isn’t pick proof. Plus, as others have mentioned, the lock mechanism isn’t very strong.



Isn't drywall fireproof? I wish I would have thought of that before I started building! (Although I am a poor college student on a tight budget )

The budget posed a problem when selecting a lock I put it in there because I got it free from my dad. Its not gonna stop anyone thats determined, but it will make it a little more difficult for people to walk by and play with my guns/title to my truck

Total cost of the project: $10


garandman: Sweet.

But why are you keeping your hat in it??

Must be one of them $18 hats.



Nah, got that hat for "free" when I worked as a mechanic for a summer. The wrenches here know what I'm talking about . The snap-on man takes your soul, and all you get is that lousy hat.
Put it in there to show the size of the safe. I wear it when I plan on getting dirty

Link Posted: 5/4/2004 6:19:17 PM EST
Cool, I was thinking about doing something like that. Thanks for the pics
Link Posted: 5/4/2004 6:51:12 PM EST
Funny.... I wear that same hat to work every day.... Nice job on the safe. I do believe I'll have to to make one myself, now... More work for me... ViseGrip
Link Posted: 5/4/2004 10:02:37 PM EST
Ok, it looks very nice, and I wish I could weld, but you do realize that with external hinges they can be knocked right off?
Link Posted: 5/4/2004 10:14:58 PM EST
Needs a biometric scanner, so it can be unlocked by reading your fingerprint
Link Posted: 5/4/2004 10:17:42 PM EST
good ammo box
Link Posted: 5/4/2004 10:41:45 PM EST

Originally Posted By jblachly:
Ok, it looks very nice, and I wish I could weld, but you do realize that with external hinges they can be knocked right off?




All he would have to do is add some weld to the top and bottom of the hunge plate, It looks pretty solid

Looks pretty damn good for a school project
Do you build this out of 10 Guage?
I was wondering why you didn't weld the full seams?
Link Posted: 5/5/2004 12:58:25 AM EST
You can always weld some fixed bolts to the inside of the door on the side where the hinges are. The tubular lock is harder to pick than a regular lock but that little latch looks really weak. Why not fashion a stronger bolt and just use the lock's latch to somehow engage the heavier bolt? Otherwise a nice job!!
Link Posted: 5/5/2004 2:43:45 AM EST
Wanna learn how to weld you say? Go by Home Depot and pick up one of these little numbers for less than $100.00.



btw, nice job.
Link Posted: 5/5/2004 3:23:59 PM EST
Assuming I would use it for little jobs (custom bracing for model railroad framework, target frames, etc, ) how big stock can that handle and what kind of duty cycle, circuit amperage?

And if I am so inclined, what other items do I need.

Helmet, fire extinguisher, gloves, fire extinguisher, clamps, power hacksaw (nice to have?), curtains to contain sparks and arcs? fire extinguisher?
Link Posted: 5/5/2004 7:05:14 PM EST
Nice work, but would agree that some thicker steel is in order.
Link Posted: 5/6/2004 5:01:45 AM EST
[Last Edit: 5/6/2004 5:02:50 AM EST by u-baddog]
Good Job !!!!

Even though it is a fine safe the most important thing to remember is this project was to learn what to change on the next one.

Quote from the person who taught me a couple of things about locks.
"Locks only keep honest and stupid people out."
" One of the thiefs greatest enemys is time"
" in the end all you can hope is to slow him down , nothing is fool proof "
Top Top