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Posted: 12/4/2007 5:25:30 AM EDT
I've got a motley collection and want to get a new set. What brand(s) do you guys recomend? Or, maybe more importantly, what brands do I stay away from? For skillets, stainless or teflon? Thanks for your help!
Link Posted: 12/4/2007 5:33:21 AM EDT
I have a set of Old Hickory black iron pans that have seen well over 15 years of near daily use and look brand new. Im beggining to think they'll be around after I turn to dust.

I dont use teflon, at all.

Cant really comment on stainless, I dont know what brands I have. Iis there really a big difference between brands of stainless?
Link Posted: 12/4/2007 5:41:11 AM EDT
Cast Iron FTW. Inexpensive compared to lots of things and will be around after your GRANDKIDS are dust. (My mom uses a cast iron skillet that was my great-great grandmothers.)

Stainless is alright. You get what you pay for. I use a few pieces for boiling rice and greens. Essentially nothing but pots. Make sure you get something layered on the bottom to avoid hot spots.

Teflon. The ideal temperature for a skillet is around 450 degrees, which is also, incidentally the melting temperature for Teflon.
Link Posted: 12/4/2007 5:41:41 AM EDT
Link Posted: 12/4/2007 5:45:21 AM EDT
Calphalon, heavy duty. Good stuff.
Link Posted: 12/4/2007 5:47:39 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Glockgirl26:
Calphalon, heavy duty. Good stuff.


That or All-Clad.
Link Posted: 12/4/2007 5:49:46 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Glockgirl26:
Calphalon, heavy duty. Good stuff.


I agree. And not too expensive. I have had the same set for almost twenty years.

Prib
Link Posted: 12/4/2007 5:50:54 AM EDT
It depends on what you cook, but I suggest hitting antique stores for a collection of cast iron skillets and then go to a restaurant supply store and get a supply of stock pots and a polished egg skillet.

You don't need to spend $400+ to get a bling set of name brand cookware. It doesn't affect the outcome
Link Posted: 12/4/2007 5:57:57 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/4/2007 5:58:45 AM EDT by Q3131A]
Here is what I would get:

1. A set of the stainless steel/copper pots/pans ($400)
2. A 15" lodge logic cast Iron pan from amazon ($15)
3. A large non-stick pan for eggs, crapes and such ($40)

Also, I would get a nice set of knives. Shun or Wustoff.


ETA: I have a full set of Calphlon, but the annodizing wears off over time.
Link Posted: 12/4/2007 5:58:04 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Glockgirl26:
Calphalon, heavy duty. Good stuff.


Good stuff. Wish I had more.


Can't go wrong with cast iron, which is the majority of my stuff.
Link Posted: 12/4/2007 6:05:16 AM EDT
Depends on if you want to cook, or impress....

My wife likes her LaCrueset dutch ovens, we have a few pieces of cast (I am not sure if their is a difference, but I have heard some complaints about cheaper cast iron (perhaps some is heavier, perhaps some is better molded - antique stuff or lodge might be better. I like my All-Clad stainless (pretty much indestructible) - but it takes getting used to. Understand between All-Clad and La Crueset it is easy to spend over 1k - wifes brother got most all of ours with an employee discount.

Some people feel that their may be health issues related to cooking with Aluminum and non-sticks. Most people don't care.
Link Posted: 12/4/2007 6:31:48 AM EDT
All Clad one pot/pan at a time!
Link Posted: 12/4/2007 6:41:53 AM EDT


I found that you can get good value at restaurant supply stores when you hand pick items (thick aluminum) that you use the most.
Link Posted: 12/4/2007 6:47:45 AM EDT
Cast iron FTW. Le Creuset is lovely stuff - check online for discounts, or at TJ Maxx/Marshall's for Le Creuset seconds that are substantially discounted from the usual price. I love my Le Creuset doufeu. It's expensive, but so are all the other non-Chinese enameled cast iron pots and pans. For most other stove-top uses, a nice, seasoned cast iron pan is just lovely. It's cheap, only slightly more difficult to clean than the Teflon-coated stuff, will last indefinitely, and if something happens to the seasoning, just cook some bacon (I exaggerate, but only a little).

Regarding non-stick, Teflon-coated, aluminum cookware - just say no. Even to the Calphalon. The finish comes off unless you are religious about not using metal utensils, the aluminum can warp if it gets too hot, and the finish can cook off and produce toxic fumes. I have a bunch left over from before I saw the light, but it only seems compelling now for making eggs. That, and I use it for boiling water, because that's what I have. I would go with stainless steel where cast iron doesn't make sense.
Link Posted: 12/4/2007 6:51:42 AM EDT
I use stainless steel Revereware.
Link Posted: 12/4/2007 6:58:18 AM EDT

Originally Posted By mcgrubbs:
LaCrueset


+1,000,000
Link Posted: 12/4/2007 7:07:05 AM EDT

Originally Posted By wildearp:
It depends on what you cook, but I suggest hitting antique stores for a collection of cast iron skillets and then go to a restaurant supply store and get a supply of stock pots and a polished egg skillet.

You don't need to spend $400+ to get a bling set of name brand cookware. It doesn't affect the outcome


Ding ding ding!

A shitty cook with the best cookware is still a shitty cook.

A great cook doesn't need expensive cookware.
Link Posted: 12/4/2007 7:20:20 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Tekka:
I use stainless steel Revereware.


I won't buy any of the new stuff...no longer made in the U.S....and the quality supposedly took a big hit. It's just a brand name now.


My cookware is mostly US made revereware and lodge cast iron. Stay the hell away from teflon...even for cooking eggs..it's disgusting when it flakes off and gets in your food

Use a little bacon grease or butter to cook eggs in an iron skillet....gives it some flavor
Link Posted: 12/4/2007 7:55:19 AM EDT
I would get some cast iron frying pans. Then get some cast iron dutch ovens. The maybe a stock pot and a couple other stainless pots.
Link Posted: 12/4/2007 1:43:19 PM EDT
I have a set of Emeril. Works fine.
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