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Posted: 9/15/2004 2:36:56 PM EST
Can somebody point me to a website laying out the basic principles of casting with a fly rod? Google returns an unmanageable number of sites on any search I can devise. Thanks.
Link Posted: 9/15/2004 2:40:04 PM EST
I'd guess LL bean or orvis would have some good info...

Best bet is to buy a cheap (under $100) rig, and stand out in the middle of someone's very large lawn, and practice. It's not as hard as it looks, to merely become competent.

Becoming an expert is beyond my skill level, by far, so now I'm back to trotlining and jug-fishing.
Link Posted: 9/15/2004 2:40:42 PM EST
find a tackle store that specializes, they will usually teach you the basics for free. hands on is better, and they will correct your bad technique.
Link Posted: 9/15/2004 2:53:19 PM EST
I learned with book and videos myself. It does take a lot of practice. I'd actually stay away from cheap rods and line however. The ability to cast with cheap shit is hindered greatly IMO.
Link Posted: 9/15/2004 2:59:41 PM EST
It isn't that hard
I learned on a cheap ugly stick fly rod -- good line helps alot.
Link Posted: 9/15/2004 2:59:41 PM EST
Link Posted: 9/15/2004 3:06:08 PM EST
I had some very qualified friends teach me years ago. there is nothing like good hands on training. I would spend the money for a 1 hour lesson and then go from there. Or check the local community college or shop they always have good classes. If you are ever in vegas give me a call and we can have a lesson. There is not any fly fishing in vegas but I am only a few hours from southern UT and the eastern sierras where there is terrific fishing.
Link Posted: 9/15/2004 3:07:41 PM EST
+1 on getting a lesson.

I see you're in Florida. Saltwater or fresh?
Link Posted: 9/15/2004 3:09:04 PM EST
Good question, There is a BIG difference between fresh and salt.
Link Posted: 9/15/2004 3:11:03 PM EST
Get yourself a good Orvis and try to find a good fisherman to teach you. You'll do much better than with any video.

Personally, I had the chance to get pointers from Joe Humphreys. That helped a lot.
Link Posted: 9/15/2004 3:11:06 PM EST
Ask a flyshop what kind of gear you need for the area that you are going. (Then buy in a large sports store) One thing I learned is: God help you if you show up with the wrong length and weight rod. People look at you like you just showed up to go duck hunting with an AR15. (come to thing of it, that might be fun, but only with Class III FA) Hands on really is best. The casting, you can probably learn somewhat on your own, but the rest of it takes instruction.
Link Posted: 9/15/2004 3:19:51 PM EST

Originally Posted By Spade:
Get yourself a good Orvis and try to find a good fisherman to teach you. You'll do much better than with any video.

Personally, I had the chance to get pointers from Joe Humphreys. That helped a lot.



My casting style is a lot like his from watching him actually. I will say that lesson are the best route, but I learned without them, and I cast better than most people I see fly-fishing. Then again, I started when I was 13 and didn't stop until 25 or so. Don't get lessons from anyone though. The sport has become so trendy it's replete with goons who lose more flies than one can imagine.
Link Posted: 9/15/2004 6:15:21 PM EST
"Fly Fishing in Salt Water" by Lefty Kreh and "Practical Saltwater Fly Fishing" by Mark Sosin.
Other than that ... a definite +1 for all who recommended a lesson from a pro. It is easier, and faster, to LEARN the right way, than to UNLEARN the bad habits you will surely teach yourself. My 2c.
Where are you in FLA ? If you're anywhere near North Miami (<100 miles) I would recommend Richter's Fly Shop ; for casting, fly-tying, and rod building. There are others, too. Stay safe
Link Posted: 9/15/2004 7:20:58 PM EST
ORVIS SUCKS (except their 8WT Spey rod). Get a Sage or St. Criox. Almost all of Orvis' rods are made by Cortland or St. Croix. I stopped fishing graphite a long time ago and now only fish split bamboo (well, except my spey rods). Not for the novice, but you'll work yourself up to it.

Lefty Kreh's book Fly Fishing for Smallmouth Bass was the one that taught me how to cast.
Link Posted: 9/15/2004 7:30:53 PM EST
Depends on what you are fishing for and where and what time of day and, well you get the point.


These guys have got it covered, start in a lawn somewhere.


Tips to remember:

Cast, don't throw, cast is a much GENTLER word.

Stop on your back and front motion COMPLETELY!!!!!

don't use your wrists at first, instead, use your arm, with your elbow locked, causing your hand to travel between 10:00 and 2:00 respectively.


REMEMBER TO CAST SLOWLY, AND GET THAT FLY TO ROLL, STOPING COMPLETELY AT 10 AND AT 2.


HAVE FUN!!!!
Link Posted: 9/15/2004 7:35:37 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/15/2004 7:46:08 PM EST by JackBurton]

Originally Posted By mtechgunman:
Depends on what you are fishing for and where and what time of day and, well you get the point.


These guys have got it covered, start in a lawn somewhere.


Tips to remember:

Cast, don't throw, cast is a much GENTLER word.

Stop on your back and front motion COMPLETELY!!!!!

don't use your wrists at first, instead, use your arm, with your elbow locked, causing your hand to travel between 10:00 and 2:00 respectively.


REMEMBER TO CAST SLOWLY, AND GET THAT FLY TO ROLL, STOPING COMPLETELY AT 10 AND AT 2.


HAVE FUN!!!!



Good tips! mtech's advice on the 10 and 2 is good. The mistake that screws up most first timers is breaking the wrist. The only place your arm moves in the basic fly cast is at the shoulder. The wrist and elbow are rigid. As you get comfortable with the basic mechanics of the cast you can loosen up a bit, BUT THE WRIST NEVER MOVES! The idea that helped me understand what I was trying to accomplish in the cast was that I was not throwing the line, I was pushing it. SO envision that clock and remember 10:00 to 2:00, start slow. Don't bring the rod forward until you feel the rod load/line unfurl behind you. I am going to go through my old links and see if I can't find something to help you. If you are fishing the salt, Lefty Kreh wrote the book on it. Wait to you are standing there on the flats and decide to try a double haul, it will be like starting all over again! Good luck!

Be advised that excessive lawn casting is hell on the first six feet of your flyline, I would suggest going to a pond or some other stillwater area, preferably one containing 'gills.

If you're going to the salt, Lefty Kreh's salt book has the same section on the cast as his Smallmouth book.
Link Posted: 9/15/2004 7:53:45 PM EST
The Orvis Flyfishing Guide was a good intro for me. Also, buy a decent quality rig. Learning on cheap stuff will turn you off faster than anything else. I have a Cortland travel outfit that I love. Easy to use, small enough for a backpack, and easy to cast. About $180 if I remember correctly. I'm not even a decent rookie by some folks standards, but it's a lot of fun and works for all kinds of fish.
Link Posted: 9/15/2004 8:31:39 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/15/2004 8:35:42 PM EST by Misery]

Originally Posted By JackBurton:
ORVIS SUCKS (except their 8WT Spey rod). Get a Sage or St. Criox. Almost all of Orvis' rods are made by Cortland or St. Croix. I stopped fishing graphite a long time ago and now only fish split bamboo (well, except my spey rods). Not for the novice, but you'll work yourself up to it.

Lefty Kreh's book Fly Fishing for Smallmouth Bass was the one that taught me how to cast.



Get a St. Croix, but Orvis rods are made by St. Croix so they suck?

Not sure why Orvis rods sucks so bad. Unless they've gone way down hill since I was in the sport. I have two run of the mill Orvis rods I got a long time ago, but they are both nice enough to fish with. I know Orvis rods aren't the best, but for a beginner I see no problem. Sage is my favorite company and I had a Sage 3 weight at one time, but it was 400 dollars. If someone decides they hate the sport they might be sorry they spent that much cash.

I realize I gave up the sport, so I'm out of the loop, but to break the bank on top quality equipment as a beginner is probably a bad idea. The problem with fly-fishing is you can by complete crap at regular sporting good stores or you can by really expensive gear at specialty shops. Fortunately, there are places like Orvis and others that have decent gear you can learn on without going broke. This is the kind of gear a beginner needs unless he's made of money. Don't get talked into unnecessary shit. Fly-fishing is a very complex sport when you really get into it, however, you can learn without buying expensive Neoprene waders and high-priced nonsense.
Link Posted: 9/15/2004 8:41:24 PM EST

Originally Posted By Misery:


Not sure why Orvis rods sucks so bad. Unless they've gone way down hill since I was in the sport. I have two run of the mill Orvis rods I got a long time ago, but they are both nice enough to fish with. I know Orvis rods aren't the best, but for a beginner I see no problem.




Orvis donates the rods to Penn State Fly Fishing, and if you're in the class or club you get a discount on the used class rods (used for one term). I love 'em, personally, and the fact that they support PSU makes them that much more attractive to me. I proclaim them good rods.


Also, save money and tie your own flies. It's not that hard, and with a few basic patterns you'll hook them. One of the most reliable patterns around here is a muskrat nymph. Grey dubbing on a small hook. Takes 30 seconds to tie, and it works.

Get a good chest fly box though. Some local guys in Bellefonte, PA I think, (one former owner was in my Masters of Fly Fishing Class), make a real nice chest box. It seemed to make that guy's life on the stream so much easier than mine.
Link Posted: 9/15/2004 8:58:21 PM EST
Good place if your looking for lowmid-upper priced gear is Hook and Hackle sometimes they have some smokin deals on rods and reels. Also the customer service is top notch, took back a St Croix rod we got for grandpa because it "didn't feel right" when compared to a couple other models...

I learned fishing on an old 7' Fenwick rod from the local department store that dad still uses instead of his 9' zippy airweight rod because he's afraid to loose it in the canoe. Biggest fish on a fly rod was with a Shakespear 4 piece spin/fly combo. Sort of of like casting with a slightly bendy stick but it was inexpensive, built like a tank and gets the job done, it still rides around in my trunk in case I see someplace that NEEDS to be fished and I wouldn't hesitate to fish any fresh water with it.

Can be dangerously addicting with all the go fast goodies you can get though and some of the folks are kind of snooty, worried about you scaring the fish and everything. Get a nice hopper or large floating fly you can see and hit a pond after some practicing in the backyard and have some fun with the pan fish while practicing
Link Posted: 9/15/2004 9:14:04 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/15/2004 9:14:51 PM EST by Misery]

Originally Posted By tz99:


Can be dangerously addicting with all the go fast goodies you can get though and some of the folks are kind of snooty, worried about you scaring the fish and everything. Get a nice hopper or large floating fly you can see and hit a pond after some practicing in the backyard and have some fun with the pan fish while practicing



No kidding. When I started out it was just the serious fly-fisherman, most of them very elitist. Here I am 13 or 14 years old and they make fun of my Orvis gear or cheap waders. Pretty rude. I remember fishing on the Green River below the damn years ago, when I caught a 19" rainbow. Immediately everyone was yelling at me to let it go before I had even brought the line in! They were pretty rude about it, yet I have always been catch and release, so they just wanted to be assholes. The best part was catching all the fish and they weren't catching shit, LOL. They were using Elkhair Caddis and I used what the fish were eating. A fly similar to a Pale Evening Dun. They just read what the store/lodge up the street posted and I went by reading the river.
Link Posted: 9/15/2004 10:50:55 PM EST
for me it's easier to cast a 6 or 7wt fly line than a 9wt. might want to start with a light rig and fish for panfish. i taught myself how to do it when i was 14 or 15. i'm still learning. definately buy a book or video, all the terminology was really confusing when i started..line/tippet/leader..wtf?

all i ever use my fly rods for is panfish. hopefully i'll get into some bass or pike/musky with my 9wt and bass bugs some day. i know where to go for the musky but i don't feel that i'm up for the challenge yet.

keep it simple, don't expect to be an expert. hopefully people in the shops near you (if you have fishing stores that carry fly fishing stuff) are not snobs. when i started i tried to take a fly tying class and they just ignored me. very rude!

st croix makes good rods, so does sage. st croix are made in WI so that's what i usually buy for my fishing rods. i have a cheap berkley 6wt rod and a sage 990.
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