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Posted: 4/18/2017 12:03:22 PM EST
I'm going put together a med kit for excursions where medical assistance might be anywhere from 6-12 hours away.

Suggestions and or pics of supplies will be greatly appreciated.

I could make it as large as a small suitcase size pelican case. It will be carried in an off-road vehicle and boat.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 12:08:42 PM EST
I keep a full aid bag in my car, but if you don't know how to use alot of that equipment it's just wasted space and money.

For general use, you wouldn't be bad off with a pretty standard issue IFAK with some NSAIDs and regular band aids thrown in. All folds up into a fairly compact package, too.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 12:11:04 PM EST
[Last Edit: 4/18/2017 12:11:44 PM EST by AS556]
Mine are all pretty much the same.

NPA, celox, TQ, izzy bandages, chest seals, duct tape, rolled or z pak gauze, gloves

Pretty much it. Shears are nice too

I'm not an EMT though

I know a couple though they pretty much carry what I do
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 12:11:58 PM EST
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 12:13:29 PM EST
Whiskey, Motrin,a few band aids and some duct tape. Should be fine with that.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 12:15:30 PM EST
Don't forget a pair of pliers or metal cutters that are strong enough to cut through a hook.

I use my Camelbak Mule, with a Dark Angel Medical trauma kit on the outside. I supplement w/2x2s, 4x4s, nsaids, bandaids, elastic wraps, etc. Also carry a can of saline spray.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 12:15:47 PM EST
Aspirin
Benadryl
Safety pin
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 12:17:52 PM EST
Ice pack, bandage, electric tape, superglue or liquid bandaid and some sort topical ointment
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 12:18:42 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By AS556:NPA, celox, TQ, izzy bandages, chest seals, duct tape, rolled or z pak gauze, gloves
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This is a good start. I personally prefer Combat Gauze to celox and silk tape to duct tape but functionally they do the same jobs. Throw in a small jar of ibuprofen or what have you, an ACE wrap, maybe a SAM splint or two, pack of lube for the NPA and I'd say you're set.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 12:26:15 PM EST
Personally, I have found that a run of the mill first aid kit that will serve 2-4 people for a couple of days will work pretty well for most situations that I'm likely to find myself in. The only additions that I make to it are some Epi Pens, Benadryl, and chewable baby aspirin.

Since I do a lot of diving I have tailored my first aid kit towards that with some O2 bottles and additional equipment but that's a whole other story.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 12:32:00 PM EST
Knowledge is more important.

Rope, linen bandages and a multi tool are more useful to someone who knows what they're doing than a full trauma kit to someone who doesn't.


Quick clot, elastic bandages, tape, scissors and a knife go a LONG way. Especially if the nearest help is 6-12 hours away, which isn't really that far away.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 12:33:40 PM EST
[Last Edit: 4/18/2017 12:34:30 PM EST by LRRPF52]
Training, training, and some more training.

Taking my Scout Troop to the Fire Station today for First Aid actually.

We have a whole section of the site dedicated to your questions, OP.

Medical Training Sub Forum
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 12:34:18 PM EST
I have been a certified paramedic for 10 years and I was an infantry corpsman for 6.

Get a first responder course done

I am not going to list all the supplies I think would be needed. I have done this too many times, but if you get a solid foundation of basic medical skills you will know what you need
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 12:36:42 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Birddog1911:
Don't forget a pair of pliers or metal cutters that are strong enough to cut through a hook.

I use my Camelbak Mule, with a Dark Angel Medical trauma kit on the outside. I supplement w/2x2s, 4x4s, nsaids, bandaids, elastic wraps, etc. Also carry a can of saline spray.
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A small diagonal cutter aka dikes have gone with me since the last time I had to do fishhook removal. I always figured the leatherman would work to clip the hook off, and they sort of do. Just not ideal.

And some kind of clean saline is really handy for flushing a wound of debris.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 12:40:03 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By jerrwhy01:

Since I do a lot of diving I have tailored my first aid kit towards that with some O2 bottles and additional equipment but that's a whole other story.
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This. If you're really that far away and going to be out for an extended time, O2 and defib would cross my mind. I keep baby aspirin and nitro in my kit, it's not a fix, but if it buys you some extra time to get somewhere.... it's cheap.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 1:18:47 PM EST
Put yourself together an admission to an advanced/remote first aid class. You will get your answers there.

There are two types of supplies for this.
A booboo bag. Tylenol, aspirin, band-aids, upset stomach medicine, and the like
Then there is an emergency bag.
This will contain bandages, splinting material, slings, and the like. Anything more advanced will require more training and expense than the average person is willing to incur, as well as a Medical Control Dr. that is willing to take you as a responsibility.

The most important tool you can carry is between your ears. That along with some imagination and solid experience or guidelines will get you where you need to be in reality.

Happy Hunting
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 1:23:08 PM EST
Tourniquets and other first aid gear, and know how to use it. Tell people where you're going, when to expect you back, and when to sound the alarm. And then one of these wouldn't hurt either: https://explore.garmin.com/en-US/inreach/
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 1:34:26 PM EST
As posted.
I take a class at least once a year.

My hiking set up has two kits-
Ouchy booboo junk- otc meds..bandaids etc.

Then I have my oh fuck kit- that's easy to get to on my pack.
It has-
CAT 
6 inch izzy
2x hh compressed gauze
1 roll of ace wrap
Big wad of 4x4s and ab pads.
Gloves
Shears
Tape
Hemostats 


Once you get trained your kit will evolve.
Mines aimed at backpacking type injuries...and its scaled down to save weight.
Vs
My big kit bag that goes car camping.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 1:45:04 PM EST
[Last Edit: 4/18/2017 1:47:42 PM EST by mardoc]
2 Triangular bandages
Various band aids all sizes
4" Kling gauze
2' Kling gauze x 2
2 x 2 sterile gauze x 6
4 x 4 sterile gauze x 4
1" Adhesive Tape
EMT Scissors
2 pair nitrite gloves
Chap stick
sunscreen
aspirin
safety pins x 4
1 ice pack
1 petroleum jelly
1 CAT tourniquet
1 space blanket
1 First response quick clot
1 2" ace wrap
1 3" ace wrap
Wire cutter
antibiotic ontiment
Antiseptic wipes x 5
small bottle hand sanitizer
iodine wipes. x 5
Sting kill
2 eye pads
5 x 9 ABD pad
Moleskin padding
ice pack
small flashlight
whistle
something to start a fire with
small note pad and mechanical pencil and permanent marker
swiss army knife, gerbertool, or leatherman

most important item:
1 basic first aid course to learn how to properly use all this crap.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 1:47:45 PM EST
Skin staplers
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 1:48:30 PM EST
The kits NOLS puts together are very comprehensive and cover most any backwoods scenario, especially if you have been trained to use them. I am certified as WAFA (Wilderness Advanced First Aid) and plan on doing the WFR (Wilderness First Responder) course as soon as I can fit it in my schedule. Learning how to make do with what is on hand makes more sense to me than lugging a huge kit around full of things you probably will not need.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 1:49:14 PM EST
TX EMT-B here. I would also recommend that you take some sort of First aid course. Hell even take a basic EMT course if you can one cheap enough.

For first aid kits you would be off either A: Buy a pre-done one from some reputable dealer or B: Find out what most of them have and put one together. I would not recommend just going to wally world and picking up a kit there.

Here is a good list of them from Gall's: Medical/First aid kits.

I would also highly recommend a venom extractor like this one: Sawyer Extractor.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 1:50:03 PM EST
Originally Posted By plumedechouette:
I'm going put together a med kit for excursions where medical assistance might be anywhere from 6-12 hours away.

Suggestions and or pics of supplies will be greatly appreciated.

I could make it as large as a small suitcase size pelican case. It will be carried in an off-road vehicle and boat.
View Quote
Go bump it for us so it does not die. Should be plenty of helpful info there . 

http://www.ar15.com/forums/t_10_18/644558_For-the-uninformed---Base-Level-Med-Kit-explained--Initial-Pricing-2-post--.html
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 3:27:15 PM EST
I have taken emergency first aid courses a couple times.

I would like to take something a bit moremcomprehensive.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 3:39:15 PM EST
If you have any experience with it an iv setup but it doesn't sound like it (not meant to be snarky, iv skills are learned and difficult to do on yourself).

Cat 5 or equivalent tourniquet.
4x4's (gauze not wood)
5x9's
Kling or roller gauze
Occlusive dressings or tegaderms
Quickclot gauze or equivalent
Hydrogen peroxide
Tweezers
Neosporine
Bandaid
Liquid bandaid or new skin.
A few of cravats


For the average person on their own that is sufficient. With others I would add

A bvm
Oral pharyngeal airways
King ltsd (Essentially advanced airways for beginners and tons videos on how to insert and use one and you don't need to know how to intubate).
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 3:48:20 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By TexasSkywarn:
TX EMT-B here.....


....


I would also highly recommend a venom extractor like this one: Sawyer Extractor.
View Quote
For what?
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 3:59:31 PM EST
[Last Edit: 4/18/2017 4:00:48 PM EST by TexasSkywarn]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By QP031:
For what?
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View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By QP031:
Originally Posted By TexasSkywarn:
TX EMT-B here.....


....


I would also highly recommend a venom extractor like this one: Sawyer Extractor.
For what?
Mainly for bee/wasp stings. Works wonders for kids unless they are allergic then you have bigger problems. We haven't tested them for dept use yet but for personal use its good.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 4:05:55 PM EST
I take a general FA kit and a suture kit on trips with the guys.
I've used the suture kit twice.
I have blowout kit I take to matches. Never used it, hope I never do.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 4:06:45 PM EST
Structured training in how/when to use them is more important than a box of supplies.  Unfortunately - most people think having stuff will save the day if things go south medically.
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