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Posted: 1/9/2005 8:24:06 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/9/2005 9:08:33 AM EDT by EricTheHun]
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 8:26:18 AM EDT
C'mon Eric, how do you really feel?
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 8:27:51 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/9/2005 8:29:46 AM EDT by SteyrAUG]
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 8:28:11 AM EDT
I am.

I'll remind anyone about it when they bitch to me about Hiroshima.....
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 8:29:07 AM EDT
Toyota & Mitsubishi to you too!

Link Posted: 1/9/2005 8:30:10 AM EDT
My tv stays tuned to THC every Sunday, all day, as we know Sunday on THC is military day.
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 8:36:39 AM EDT


What goes around comes around FUCKERS!
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 8:39:22 AM EDT
Bataan was only part of it. And we get all up in arms because we put them into camps here. Yes it was terrible, but yes we had a problem with spies. Unfortunately the Japanese spies for the most part were Japanese thus easy to "round up"... I don't condone it but... it happened.

btw God "damns" noone.
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 8:45:29 AM EDT
...and we had to leave their scumbag tin-pot emperor on the throne to ensure a "peaceful" occupation.

I would have either nuked the islands from end to end, or blockaded the islands, poisoned the rice fields, and let them starve.

Assholes!

Yes, God DOES damn some. These people not only rejected the Son, they took great relish in bringing still-untold horrors to their fellow man. The floors of Hell are paved with the skulls of people like that.
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 8:47:22 AM EDT
Read Flyboys and Ghost Soldiers. Unbelievable what those bastards did to helpless prisoners and civilians.
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 8:47:46 AM EDT
The idea of them not ackowledging their war atrocities still pisses me off, I don't care about reperations. Some of my mom and dads family where victims of the japanese war crimes. Just admit you did some fucked up shit then you can whine about the atomic bomb
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 8:50:01 AM EDT

Originally Posted By doorgunner84:
www.childrenofthemanhattanproject.org/PH/LA_2/LAP-102.jpg

What goes around comes around FUCKERS!






Link Posted: 1/9/2005 8:51:02 AM EDT
And as always, there is always one scumbag puke POS American on the high court to side with the enemies of everything that is good and decent in the world.
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 8:53:24 AM EDT
I visited the Chinese War Museum in Chang Chung in Jalin Province .There where displays of the torture , gassing and medical experiments on Chinse civilians that would have embarressed the Nazi SS.
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 8:55:02 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/9/2005 8:56:01 AM EDT by SteyrAUG]
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 9:00:11 AM EDT
Yep.
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 9:02:05 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/9/2005 9:05:21 AM EDT by Zaphod]
So we let the leader go? Sorry, I'm not buying, and we could always build more bombs (and did).

I'll not forget that all those "innocents" thought of that asshole as god, and were being prepared to fight the Americans with bamboo spears.

Oh! and as ALSO usual, one of the judges blamed US for the war! Nice to know some things don't change, eh?

ETA: Even if leaving him there was ageopolitical necessity, he should have been forced to publicly admit to all the horrors that now, 50 years later, so many people STILL deny...
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 9:03:17 AM EDT
My father told me stories about the camps. His unit found a camp once, but unfortunately the cowardly Japans had all ready committed Hari Kari (sp). There was talk about the Japan feeding the POWs human flesh because they found remains (bones) that looked as though they were boiled or cooked in some way. Wouldn't put it past the Japanese at that time of taking a few bites themselves. Sorta wish we had 12 bombs to drop instead of only two. Since then, they have beed humbled.

I believe the figure to be 60% mortality rate in the Japanese POW camps, whereare the mortality rate in German POW camps (for Americans and Brits at least) was about 7%. Obviously, everyone knows what the Germans did to the Jews, but they also believed the Russians and Pols were sub-human as well. They fared way better with the Germans than what the American POW's did with the Japanese
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 9:07:37 AM EDT
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 9:12:01 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/9/2005 9:13:50 AM EDT by Zaphod]

Originally Posted By SteyrAUG:
Even worse than Hirohito was the scientists in Manchuria who conducted bio weapons experiments on the populations there. None of them were ever tried for war crimes because we wanted their data. So we traded, nothing happened to any of them.



Very true, and a disgrace of incredible proportions.


That same "us" and "them" mentality is how Jews ended up in camps and Americans on the "death march." It was certainly NOT "all" of them.


All well and good, but I would not have been willing to sacrifice a million Americans to find the few good ones, or to have let so many guilty ones get away.

Also, the "them" here was an entire nation that went to war, not a slice of society "guilty" of all kinds of trumped-up bullshit. I guess we shouldn't have nuked or bombed Japan because, after all, a few innocents died...


The Japanese have more than enough guilty to offer up without us condeming the innocent. And before we get to them we should put our own house in order. Lots of shame and disgrace to go around.


And what, exactly, has this country done in the modern era that even remotely compares to what the Japanese did that would cause us to put our own house in order before cleaning out theirs?

You want to defend the innocent? Fine, and admirable, but don't even try to compare ANYTHING we've done with what they did. Even what happened to the Indians pales in comparison.
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 9:30:01 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/9/2005 9:30:37 AM EDT by SteyrAUG]
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 9:32:00 AM EDT
BOOM..........................................SIZZLE!
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 9:34:17 AM EDT
Bataan was only part of it. And we get all up in arms because we put them into camps here. Yes it was terrible, but yes we had a problem with spies. Unfortunately the Japanese spies for the most part were Japanese thus easy to "round up"... I don't condone it but... it happened




What is never made public is the fact that alot of these pople in those camps were hostile to the US and refused to sign loyalty oaths. Not saying it was the best way to do it, but at the time we had no choise.
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 9:37:22 AM EDT
Uh oh...Eth's been talking to my granddaddy.

Nobody believed him... I've heard him talk about the atrocities since I was kid.
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 9:44:41 AM EDT

Originally Posted By SteyrAUG:
It wasn't necessary to win the war and it would have put us in league with the Japanese and Germans for attrocities.



Hmmmmm.


Again I was referring to things like trading bio weapon data for not prosecuting the criminals who obtained it by experimenting on innocent populations and appointing war criminals to the Japanese diet.


Ah! Got it. Sorry.


I "understand" why we absolved Hirohito and it was "probably" necessary in the lives of US servicemen saved. But where we the allies (mostly the French) went overboard after WWI and caused WWII by their demonization of the enemy, we went too far in the opposite direction by not holding Japan (and her war criminals) accountable enough. The British were especially displeased with our lax treatment of Japanese war criminals as they suffered exceptionally under the Japanese.


I'm with you, brother!


To understand why we did what we did I'd strongly recommend the film "Hiroshima"


Never heard of that one. I'll keep an eye out.


And if you want a real eye opener regarding Japanese attrocity read "The Rape of Nanking: The Forgotten Holocaust of World War II".


I've heard about that one. It's on my "to get" list.
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 9:45:24 AM EDT
Last summer I visited Sasebo, Japan as part of a Carrier Strike Group. While we were there I attended a tour to Nagasaki.

I was appalled at the attitudes of my shipmates. They mostly beleived that we shouldnt have nuked them. Whenever anyone asked me for my opinion, I said I was glad we did it. Dropping the atomic bombs on Japan broght an early end to the war and prevented the massive casualties from a large scale invasion.

Dropping the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki were the right thing to do.

Link Posted: 1/9/2005 10:11:22 AM EDT
They deserved every atom for what they did. IMHO it was better than sending more troops to get killed in an invasion of Japan.
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 10:15:32 AM EDT
Just as an aside, what was the reason for not bombing, say, Tokyo? Was it to preserve a government with which to negotiate, or some other reason?
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 10:16:32 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/9/2005 10:18:30 AM EDT by jkstexas2001]

Originally Posted By SteyrAUG:

Originally Posted By EricTheHun:
About Japanese brutalities against US POWs in WWII?

It should be required viewing in all present-day Japanese schools!

And I mean required!

Like for Japan to even have a consulate in this Country today!

God Damn the Imperial Japanese to Hell!

Eric The(AndScrewTheirEmperor,Too!)Hun




And there is so much that won't even be covered. The Japanese made the Nazis look like rank amatuers.


Best one I know of is a Japanese officer ATE the liver of one of the Doolittle fliers. Not only was he NEVER charged with war crimes he was later appointed to the Diet (an ironic name for Japan's governement) by US occupational forces.

Only our shame comes close to that which is reserved for Japan.




Yes, and he didn't bother to kill the man before taking out the liver. They also were fond of vivisection - operating on our POW's without anesthetics, removing organs while they were screaming for death, for medical research purposes.

Link Posted: 1/9/2005 10:30:20 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/9/2005 10:32:37 AM EDT by ARDOC]
You guys have nothing to bitch about.

During WWII they took away and killed my Granddad. Took away everything on our farm except the dirt. My Grandmother and my Dad almost starved to death because they took all their crops and food they had grown all summer. Until the day she died, my Grandmom was a little obsessed with food. You can never forget if you were hungry. If you she offered you food, she definitely liked you.

They took away other Korean women to be sex slaves for their troops. The men became forced labor in far flung places like the South Pacific. A lot of times they were killed by US troops because they didnt know any better. I guess we all look alike to you roundeye types.
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 10:34:06 AM EDT
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 10:37:21 AM EDT
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 10:41:37 AM EDT
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 10:42:43 AM EDT
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 10:43:02 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/9/2005 10:44:36 AM EDT by vito113]
Look up what the Japanese did at Unit 731 … you will NEVER look at a Jap the same again… this was true horror…

WARNING!!!!! The historys of Unit 731 contain VERY graphic and horrifying pictures and accounts…


www.aiipowmia.com/731/731caveat.html



If anyone wants a good primer on Japanese War Crimes read 'The Knights of Bushido" by Lord Russel of Liverpool

www.greenhillbooks.com/booksheets/knights_bushido.html

ANdy
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 10:44:19 AM EDT
People seem to forget history.......

I am Filipino. Both parents. Mom was IN the Philippines during WWII and she was hiding from them. She heard and saw the brutality on what they did.......


Link Posted: 1/9/2005 10:45:03 AM EDT
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 10:45:19 AM EDT
But vito we also took the head of 731 in and gave him amnesty for all the info and data he had collected. A lot of our biological weapons research began with him. Our space program is a direct result of getting VonBraun. (sp).
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 10:51:46 AM EDT

Originally Posted By ARDOC:
But vito we also took the head of 731 in and gave him amnesty for all the info and data he had collected. A lot of our biological weapons research began with him. Our space program is a direct result of getting VonBraun. (sp).



Yes… but Colonel Ishi was a true fucking monster… Von Braun may have had his faults, but he did not desect live prisoners…
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 10:52:19 AM EDT
http://www.aiipowmia.com/731/vivisection.html

Japan Admits Dissecting WW II POWs

By Thomas Easton
The Baltimore Sun
Index

Live dissection of American POWs
When and where
How they died
The sentence
MacArthur let the mudrerers go free

UKUOKA, Japan "I could never again wear a white smock," says Dr. Toshio Tono, dressed in a white running jacket at his hospital and recalling events of 50 years ago. "It's because the prisoners thought that we were doctors, since they could see the white smocks, that they didn't struggle. They never dreamed they would be dissected."

The prisoners were eight American airmen, knocked out of the sky over southern Japan during the waning months of World War U, and then torn apart organ by organ while they were still alive.

What occurred here 50 years ago this month, at the anatomy department of Kyushu University, has been largely forgotten in Japan and is virtually unknown in the United States. American prisoners of war were subjected to horrific medical experiments. All of the prisoners died. Most of the physicians and asistants then did their best to hide the evidence of what they had done.

Fukuoka is midway between Hiroshima and Nagasaki, cities that are planning elaborate ceremonies to mark the devastation caused by the United States'dropping the first atomic bombs. But neither Fukuoka nor the university plans to mark its own moment of infamy.

The gruesome experiments performed at the university were variations on research programs Japan conducted in territories it occupied during the war. In the most notorious of these efforts, the Japanese Imperial Army's Unit 731 killed thousands of Chinese and Russians held prisoner in Japanese-occupied Manchuria, in experiments to develop chemical and biological weapons.

Ken Yuasa, now a frail, 70-year-old physician in Tokyo, belonged to a military company stationed just south of Unit 731's base at Harbin, Manchuria. He recalls joining other doctors to watch as a prisoner was shot in the stomach, to give Japanese surgeons practice at extracting bullets.

While the victim was still alive, the doctors also practiced amputations.

"It wasn't just my experience," Yuasa says. "It was done everywhere."

Kyushu University stands out as the only site where Americans were incontrovertibly used in dissections and the only known site where experiments were done in Japan.

On May 5, 1945, an American B-29 bomber was flying with a dozen other aircraft after bombing Tachiaral Air Base in southwestern Japan and beginning the return flight to the island fortress of Guam.

Kinzou Kasuya, a 19-year-old Japanese pilot flying one of the Japanese fighters in pursuit of the Americans, rammed his aircraft into the fuselage of the B-29, destroying both planes.

No one knows for certain how many Americans were in the B-29; its crew had been hastily assembled on Guam. But villagers in Japan who witnessed the collision in the air saw about a dozen parachutes blossom.

One of the Americans died when the cords of his, parachute were severed by another Japanese plane. A second was alive when he reached the ground. He shot all but his last bullet at the villagers coming toward him, then used the last on himself.

Two others were quickly stabbed or shot to death.

At least nine were taken into custody.

B-29 crews were despised for the grim results of their raids. So some of the captives were beaten.

The local authorities assumed that the most knowledgeable was the captain, Marvin Watkins. He was sent to Tokyo for interrogation, where was tortured but nonetheless survived the war.

Every available account asserts that a military physician and a colonel in a local regiment were the two key figures in what happened next. What happened cannot be easily explained. Perhaps caring for the Americans was an impossible burden, especially because some were injured. Perhaps food was scarce.

Whatever the reason, the colonel and doctor decided to make the prisoners available for medical experiments, and Kyushu University became a willing participant.

Teddy Ponczka was the first to be handed over to the doctors and their assistants. He had already been stabbed, in either his right shoulder or his chest. According to Tono, the American assumed he was about to be treated for the wound when he was taken to an operating room.

But the incision went far deeper. A doctor wanted to test surgery's effects on the respiratory system, so one lung was removed. The wound was stitched closed.

How Teddy Ponczka died is in dispute. According to U.S. military records, he was anesthetized during the operation, and then the gas mask was removed from his face. A surgeon, Taro Torisu, reopened the incision and reached into Ponczka's chest. In the bland words of the military report, Torisu "stopped the heart action."

Tono remembers events differently. The first experiment was followed by a second, he says. Ponczka was given intravenous injections of sea water, to determine if sea water could be used as a substitute for sterile saline solution, used to increase blood volume in the wounded or those in'shock. Tono held the bottle of sea water. He says Ponczka bled to death.

Then it was the turn of the others.

The Japanese wanted to learn whether a patient could survive the partial loss of his liver. They wanted to learn if epilepsy could be controlled by removing part of the brain. According to U.S. military records, physicians also operated on -the prisoners' stomachs and necks.

All the Americans died.

"There was no debate among the doctors about whether to do the operations - that is what made it so strange," Tono says.

Word of the experiments eventually leaked out.

Thirty people were brought to trial by an Allied war crimes tribunal in Yokohama, Japan, on March 11, 1948. Charges included vivisection, wrongful removal of body parts and cannibalism - based on reports that the experimenters had eaten the livers of the Americans.

Of the 30 defendants, 23 were found guilty of various charges. (For lack of proof, the charges of cannibalism had been dismissed.) Five of the guilty were sentenced to death, four to life imprisonment. The other 14 were sentenced to shorter terms.

But the attitude of the American occupation forces began to change largely because of the start of the Korean War in June 1950. The United States had less interest in punishing Japan, an enemy-turned-ally.

In September 1950, U.S. Gen. Douglas MacArthur, as supreme commander for Allied Forces, reduced most of the sentences. By 1958, all those convicted were free. None of the death sentences was carried out.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 11:05:41 AM EDT
I am currently reading a book entitled "I am Alive" by Marine Sergeant Major Charles R. Jackson (Ballantine 2003). He was captured on Corregidor and was a POW in the phillipines and later on the island of japan (three years?). He states in his Introduction:

"Strange as it must seem to some of you, I bear no hatred toward the Japanese .... there are a few Japanese against whom I bear a personal grudge, and it would not be true to deny it. Yet, on the whole, I think I can safely speak for most of the fellow prisoners whom I knew, and say that we bear them no ill will. ... I closing, I repeat I cannot hate the Japanese." p.2-3.
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 11:10:35 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/9/2005 11:10:58 AM EDT by Zaphod]

Originally Posted By SteyrAUG:

Originally Posted By Zaphod:

Hmmmmm.



To clarify, it wasn't necessary to go to those "extremes" to win the war. The way we did it, with atomic bombs rather than mass famine or total atomic destruction, was the correct way.



My remark was a recognition that I had seen your point. Sorry if I was unclear.



I'd rate it right below Tora, Tora, Tora as the second most comprehensive and accurate film about our war with Japan.



Wow. That good, eh? Cool!
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 11:11:43 AM EDT

Originally Posted By SteyrAUG:
Interesting fact.

All of the purple hearts in todays inventory of decorations are ALL 1945 production. They were made in anticipation of their need for the US invasion of mainland Japan. We still haven't handed them all out yet despite all the military conflicts since 1945.

Tell THAT to the next person who says we shouldn't have dropped the bombs.



Jesus! Are you SERIOUS?
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 11:13:43 AM EDT

Originally Posted By SteyrAUG:
No, Tokyo was virtually destroyed. We didn't drop it for 2 reasons.

1. We wanted an untouched target to demonstrate the weapon capabilities. Only an untouched target would have demonstrated what a single atom bomb would do. The only traget removed from the list was Kyoto and it was the correct thing to do. Stimpson had been to Japan and knew it was the cultural center of the country and would have negative results in seeking a Japanese surrender.



Ah, yes. I'd forgotten that.


2. We didn't want to risk the death of the Emporer which would have given the Japanese a "final resolve" and made surrender impossible. Remember that the Battle of Britain and the London Blitz strengthened, and didn't weaken, British resolve.


Yeah. That's what I figured.....
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 11:15:50 AM EDT

Originally Posted By vito113:

Originally Posted By ARDOC:
But vito we also took the head of 731 in and gave him amnesty for all the info and data he had collected. A lot of our biological weapons research began with him. Our space program is a direct result of getting VonBraun. (sp).



Yes… but Colonel Ishi was a true fucking monster… Von Braun may have had his faults, but he did not desect live prisoners…



Yeah, really. There is no comparison.

That would be like accusing John Moses Browning of being a war criminal because of his firearm designs....
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 11:30:59 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/9/2005 11:32:41 AM EDT by Zhukov]

Originally Posted By Zaphod:

Originally Posted By SteyrAUG:
Interesting fact.

All of the purple hearts in todays inventory of decorations are ALL 1945 production. They were made in anticipation of their need for the US invasion of mainland Japan. We still haven't handed them all out yet despite all the military conflicts since 1945.

Tell THAT to the next person who says we shouldn't have dropped the bombs.



Jesus! Are you SERIOUS?



That is indeed the same thing I have also heard.

There was a one hour special on the History channel or somesuch, and they discussed the planned US invasion of Japan if it were to have become necessary. There was really only one place to invade due to geographical limitations, and the Japanese knew that as well and could defend approriately. The casualty estimate went as high as one million if that had occured.

The aftermath of the war was such that once it was finally over, people wanted to "get on with it". The Germans had their Nuremberg trial, and by the time the Japanese got their turn, interest had waned. Plain and simple. Of course the US wanted the results of the scientific data from Unit 731, so a lot of them got away scot free.

"The Rape of Nanking" by Iris Chang is very disturbing. All the tales of cruelty are unbelievable. The worst has to be Japanese soldiers throwing infants into the air and "catching" them on bayonets.

There's another book I have read by a Japanese national that chronicles the behavior of the Japanese Army in the late 19th and the 20th century. He shows that they behaved honorably, or at least no worse than any other Army until their code of Bushido got corrupted in fairly short order in the late 20s and 30s.

[Edited to add quotes to book title]
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 12:30:24 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/9/2005 12:44:04 PM EDT by vito113]

Originally Posted By Avtomat:
I am currently reading a book entitled "I am Alive" by Marine Sergeant Major Charles R. Jackson (Ballantine 2003). He was captured on Corregidor and was a POW in the phillipines and later on the island of japan (three years?). He states in his Introduction:

"Strange as it must seem to some of you, I bear no hatred toward the Japanese .... there are a few Japanese against whom I bear a personal grudge, and it would not be true to deny it. Yet, on the whole, I think I can safely speak for most of the fellow prisoners whom I knew, and say that we bear them no ill will. ... I closing, I repeat I cannot hate the Japanese." p.2-3.



He is in a minority… I meet veterans of the War in the East and many of them hate the Japs with a vengence.

Have you read the book Hell in the Pacific…
www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0752219499/qid=1105305635/sr=8-8/ref=sr_8_xs_ap_i5_xgl14/104-5475813-2709502?v=glance&s=books&n=507846

or the Channel 4 TV series of the same name? (usually shown on Discovery)… There seemed to be real hatred of the Japs by many veterans…

Or read "With the Old Guard at Pelilieu and Okinawa" by Eugene B Sledge, he had a pretty harsh view of the Japanese.

ANdy
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 12:37:57 PM EDT
Any person who lived through the horrors described herein and STILL be able to forgive the Japanese is a far better person than I....
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 1:33:11 PM EDT

Originally Posted By vito113:

Originally Posted By Avtomat:
I am currently reading a book entitled "I am Alive" by Marine Sergeant Major Charles R. Jackson (Ballantine 2003). He was captured on Corregidor and was a POW in the phillipines and later on the island of japan (three years?). He states in his Introduction:

"Strange as it must seem to some of you, I bear no hatred toward the Japanese .... there are a few Japanese against whom I bear a personal grudge, and it would not be true to deny it. Yet, on the whole, I think I can safely speak for most of the fellow prisoners whom I knew, and say that we bear them no ill will. ... I closing, I repeat I cannot hate the Japanese." p.2-3.



He is in a minority… I meet veterans of the War in the East and many of them hate the Japs with a vengence.

Have you read the book Hell in the Pacific…
www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0752219499/qid=1105305635/sr=8-8/ref=sr_8_xs_ap_i5_xgl14/104-5475813-2709502?v=glance&s=books&n=507846

or the Channel 4 TV series of the same name? (usually shown on Discovery)… There seemed to be real hatred of the Japs by many veterans…

Or read "With the Old Guard at Pelilieu and Okinawa" by Eugene B Sledge, he had a pretty harsh view of the Japanese.

ANdy

I posted the above because I am currently reading the book and noted the above quote; I am not arguing that WWII veterans do not hate the japs or that no war crimes were committed. And yes, I have read Sledge (I think the book is called "With the Old Breed," he lives not too far away from here actually), although i do not recall that he had a harsh view of the japs.
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 1:35:06 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Zaphod:
Any person who lived through the horrors described herein and STILL be able to forgive the Japanese is a far better person than I....

I guess that it is why he said "Strange as it must seem to some of you...."!!!
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 1:56:06 PM EDT
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