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11/24/2017 4:44:23 PM
11/22/2017 10:05:29 PM
Posted: 8/28/2004 4:40:53 AM EST
Is there a way to keep these things relatively maintenance free? I'd like to get a large freshwater tank & some fish to put in it, but I don't want to be scrubbing tank walls every week and trying to keep the thing clean. Are there critters that you can put in the water to eat the algae? What about critters to eat the fish shit?
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 4:47:04 AM EST
Plecos will keep the algea to a minimum. look here

As for the fish poopoo. Filtration, Filtration, Filtration. Big tank excess filters and under populated tank will make it easy to care for.
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 4:48:06 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/28/2004 4:50:34 AM EST by Annarchy]
There are many different ways to do it. From types of filters to fish. Small sucker fish and cat fish work well, depending on how large of a tank, 1 pair of each. Eel variety will do some of the cleaning under the landscaping. It also depends upon how many fish you want to have and the types. Some of them are messy fish to begin with.

I've seen the plecos actually swim upside down on the surface eating the other fish.
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 4:48:24 AM EST
You can get a plecostomus or two to keep the algae down and some little cory catfish to keep the tank clean. You still have to change some of the water occasionally. The fish can't do it all. I have a 30 gallon tank. I change out 10 gallons of water a month. It's not much trouble.
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 5:02:25 AM EST
Changing out water doesn't sound like too big a deal. I could probably handle that part.

What I'm remembering is our goldfish tank when I was a kid. Every so often my mom would scoop out the fish with a net, put them in a bowl, and put the tank in the kitchen sink and scape the sides with a razor blade. I have no interest whatsoever in doing this with a much larger tank.
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 5:10:51 AM EST
To keep the algae down do not place the tank where a lot of sunlight will hit it and do not leave the light on much.
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 5:17:22 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/28/2004 6:38:08 AM EST by ilikelegs]
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 5:17:54 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/28/2004 5:19:01 AM EST by CRC]
There are mag floats which are magnets that get the algae off the walls.

For easy maintence fish I would reccomend gars.

Cool, predatory and very hardy.

Just give them some room to breathe some air at the top of the tank and keep the water clear.

A channel catfish will provide some company and eat leftover food on the bottom.


CRC
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 5:28:19 AM EST

Originally Posted By norman74:
Changing out water doesn't sound like too big a deal. I could probably handle that part.

What I'm remembering is our goldfish tank when I was a kid. Every so often my mom would scoop out the fish with a net, put them in a bowl, and put the tank in the kitchen sink and scape the sides with a razor blade. I have no interest whatsoever in doing this with a much larger tank.



You should never completely take down a tank. You will kill the needed bacterial colonies.

You need multiple filters. And you never clean them at the same time.

.

Read more here
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 5:32:49 AM EST
You should take down the whole tank if it gets too bad.

But you shouldn't let it reach that point.

CRC
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