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12/6/2019 7:27:02 PM
Posted: 9/30/2011 12:10:03 PM EST
I may have to replace our 3 car wide driveway. It is crumbling and I'm guessing in the next 5 years it will have to come out. Can anyone give me an idea on how much it would cost for a concrete company to remove the old slab and pour a new slab? The length is about average at a little shorter then 2 car lengths. Here is a picture. Forget the car is there and I'm almost in the garage taking the picture and you can almost see the far end of the driveway. Kind of gives you an idea of it's size. Thanks for any info!
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 12:57:19 PM EST
I do, but only in the overshoes industry. Sorry, can't tell you about removal.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 1:09:50 PM EST
I tried it but it's too hard to move around in, especially when it starts to set.








Roy
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 1:14:20 PM EST
You won't have to pull up the old driveway and re-install a new one...
You repair the section that is falling in or breaking up.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 1:15:03 PM EST
It would be more helpful if you went out and actually measured it.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 1:16:17 PM EST
What thickness would help too.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 1:18:35 PM EST
Do you really *have to* replace it?

Is it worth the cost of several new rifles to have a driveway without cracks? Slap a coat of asphalt on it, be done with it.

YMMV.

Link Posted: 9/30/2011 1:19:27 PM EST
I work in red brick:



... oh wait...
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 1:20:50 PM EST
I used to but it got too heavy so I switched to wearing denim at work.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 1:21:13 PM EST
Originally Posted By schizrade:
I work in red brick:

http://www.nevadamax.com/page18/snct.jpg

... oh wait...


Hmmm...I would never have thought of 'Nevada' and 'tourism' together.

Link Posted: 9/30/2011 1:21:29 PM EST
Ask Jimmy Hoffa, he's been in it for a long time.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 1:21:31 PM EST
Need demensions... aslo demo work is simple, rent a jack hammer do it your self save some money... as other have said, you may not need to tear it all out, just replace the pads that are broken.....
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 1:24:40 PM EST
Originally Posted By Bobby_the_Hun:
Ask Jimmy Hoffa, he's been in it for a long time.
He was actually crushed in a car and shipped to Japan and made into cars....I read this is some gangsters bio a few years ago...

Link Posted: 9/30/2011 1:25:47 PM EST
Originally Posted By WhirlyGirl45:
Originally Posted By Bobby_the_Hun:
Ask Jimmy Hoffa, he's been in it for a long time.
He was actually crushed in a car and shipped to Japan and made into cars....I read this is some gangsters bio a few years ago...



That's a new one to me

Link Posted: 9/30/2011 1:28:03 PM EST
My dad owns a Concrete and excavating business.

His estimates for driveways/sidewalks are cost of materials x 2.

Figure out how much cement you need in cubic yards. A thickness of 4" is average for a driveway. Call the local plant and ask how much a cubic yard is. Multiply cost of materials by two. Should be pretty close to what people in your area are charging. It will be a little more because of removal and if you have re-bar or fiber it will be a lot more.

Link Posted: 9/30/2011 1:30:18 PM EST
Concrete is $104 a yard delivered here. I'm going to guess $8000 give or take.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 1:31:46 PM EST
Originally Posted By Bobby_the_Hun:
Originally Posted By WhirlyGirl45:
Originally Posted By Bobby_the_Hun:
Ask Jimmy Hoffa, he's been in it for a long time.
He was actually crushed in a car and shipped to Japan and made into cars....I read this is some gangsters bio a few years ago...



That's a new one to me

It was to me as well....wish I could remember the guys name...a very credible story IMO but who really knows?

Link Posted: 9/30/2011 1:44:34 PM EST
This is not hard.

If it's a rectangle, you just need to measure the length and width.

I'm going to guess (based on the size of a Volvo sedan), that it's 30 feet long and 24 feet wide. Standard depth is 4". With those measurements, you'll need 9 yards. There are a ton of online calcs that will give you the volume of concrete you need delivered if you have the measurements for the slab. The contractor will want to come out and estimate the job himself though (if he doesn't, I'd consider that a red flag). The largest trucks around here haul 10 yards.

The cost of materials is highly dependent on location, because the cost of gravel and sand varies a lot across the country. I'd guess $1000 for the materials if you're getting 9 yards, but local pricing will vary.

Everyone I know figures labor by the square foot. If you're going to have them tear out the old, haul it away, and pour back, you're going to end up spending 4-5k I'd guess. But again, everyone does free estimates.

Call around and get some referrals. There are a lot of people who have no clue what they are doing. Also, it's a big-time buyer's market right now as most of their work (new construction) has dried up.

Don't just jackhammer up one section and replace it; it won't match and it will look like crap in a nice neighborhood like yours.

Don't put ice on it in the winter and the top is much less likely to start to pop off/crumble.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 1:51:45 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/30/2011 1:54:34 PM EST by jayjay1]
Is it just crumblin or is it even broken.
Is it a cosmetic or a constructive porblem?

If it is just cosmetic, clean the concrete and make a coat with epoxy resin on it.
If it is to slippery disperse a little quartz sand in the wet epoxy, right after you coated it.

With the quartz sand you can configurate a special look (colour - women like bling-bling, and grain size).
If there is a little artist in you, you can even create a picture or any kind of motive with different coloured sand.


If it is going to get broken, take the concrete out and lay macadam therefore or plaster it with concrete bricks.

All of that will be cheaper than the concrete version.
The macadam is a little more abrasive, but that doesn´t bother by the way you are forcing it.
It is first of all just more flexible.

The plaster can work a little and won´t brake.
If you have enough from it, you can change it easily.

That´s what I would do.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 1:51:51 PM EST
Go to the yellow pages and call some local concrete contractors. They will come out and give you a bid.
What I charge as a General contractor in California is going to be waaay different than one in Colorado.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 1:55:03 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/30/2011 6:37:27 PM EST by GabRanch]


Have you checked to see if it is still under warranty from the builder?
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 1:56:54 PM EST
I don't see any problems in the pic you posted. Is it a small area somewhere?
Maybe post a pic of the area you are concerned with.

Do you use salt in the winter? That will tear up concrete fast.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 1:59:39 PM EST

Originally Posted By TGrant:
My dad owns a Concrete and excavating business.

His estimates for driveways/sidewalks are cost of materials x 2.

Figure out how much cement you need in cubic yards. A thickness of 4" is average for a driveway. Call the local plant and ask how much a cubic yard is. Multiply cost of materials by two. Should be pretty close to what people in your area are charging. It will be a little more because of removal and if you have re-bar or fiber it will be a lot more.

Thats a good starting point.


Link Posted: 9/30/2011 2:00:31 PM EST

Originally Posted By GabRanch:
Howdy neighbor!

You live just a block or so north of me, have you checked to see if it is still under warranty from the builder? Mine had a 5 year warranty, which I am now past, but your house in newer than mine.

OP, I think you have a stalker on your hands.
Maybe he could "work" in concrete.

Link Posted: 9/30/2011 2:05:10 PM EST
Originally Posted By VRMN8R:

Originally Posted By GabRanch:
Howdy neighbor!

You live just a block or so north of me, have you checked to see if it is still under warranty from the builder? Mine had a 5 year warranty, which I am now past, but your house in newer than mine.

OP, I think you have a stalker on your hands.
Maybe he could "work" in concrete.



Negative ghost rider. I just recognize the neighborhood and know that some others here have had similar problems that they had the builder fix under warranty. You keep your delusions of surprise butsecks to yourself. For the record I hate working with concrete....

Link Posted: 9/30/2011 2:17:55 PM EST
Depends on your region...

Here it costs about 3.5 to 4 dollars a square foot for four inch thick flatwork.

Tear out is extra. IIRC it's about $1.50 per sq/ft

Not sure if that helps.

FWIW, I do not work in construction but do work in the industry.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 3:37:21 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/30/2011 3:40:11 PM EST by Jame_Retief]

Originally Posted By TGrant:
My dad owns a Concrete and excavating business.

His estimates for driveways/sidewalks are cost of materials x 2.

Figure out how much cement you need in cubic yards. A thickness of 4" is average for a driveway. Call the local plant and ask how much a cubic yard is. Multiply cost of materials by two. Should be pretty close to what people in your area are charging. It will be a little more because of removal and if you have re-bar or fiber it will be a lot more.


This has got to be way off.

Guy below says $104 for cubic yard. 208 for a slab? Any slab that is one cubic yard? If that is all it was I am pretty sure nobody would end up with a short asphalt driveway, cause I got quoted a re-surface for $2200 for asphalt for a 50x20 driveway.

ETA: No, doing the numbers in my head, I take that back.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 3:46:22 PM EST
Originally Posted By rdsr:
I tried it but it's too hard to move around in, especially when it starts to set.








Roy


This post is too funny.



Link Posted: 10/1/2011 7:46:58 AM EST
Originally Posted By GabRanch:
Originally Posted By VRMN8R:

Originally Posted By GabRanch:
Howdy neighbor!

You live just a block or so north of me, have you checked to see if it is still under warranty from the builder? Mine had a 5 year warranty, which I am now past, but your house in newer than mine.

OP, I think you have a stalker on your hands.
Maybe he could "work" in concrete.



Negative ghost rider. I just recognize the neighborhood and know that some others here have had similar problems that they had the builder fix under warranty. You keep your delusions of surprise butsecks to yourself. For the record I hate working with concrete....



No kidding? Where are you at? Are you across the street or in the same neighbothood?
Link Posted: 10/1/2011 7:55:33 AM EST

Originally Posted By arowneragain:
Originally Posted By schizrade:
I work in red brick:

http://www.nevadamax.com/page18/snct.jpg

... oh wait...


Hmmm...I would never have thought of 'Nevada' and 'tourism' together.


Well there's this little place there called Las Vegas.

Once word gets out I think it's really going to catch on.
Link Posted: 10/1/2011 8:00:55 AM EST
Originally Posted By WhirlyGirl45:
I used to but it got too heavy so I switched to wearing denim at work.



No lace?
Link Posted: 10/1/2011 9:49:52 AM EST
If I were in CO, I'd probably rather have an asphalt driveway.

Once concrete cracks (and it always cracks) the freeze thaw cycle will destroy a concrete surface quickly. However, If you stay on top of the cracks with a good polyurethane sealant (sonneborne SL1 comes to mind for this particular application) you can minimize the damage from freeze thaw.
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