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Posted: 8/20/2006 5:46:24 PM EDT
Hosted by an ex Navy SEAL.  They were talking about EMP weaponry.  He was interviewing the worlds leading expert on EMP.  He said the Russians had built some the size of soda cans - and that many are missing or have been sold.  A single one could shut down an entire airport leaving the planes above it blind, a single one could wipe out Wall Street.  The interviewer asked, out of a scale of 1 to 10, what the risk of this attack is, the expert replied "An 8".  This expert is a former Navy Commander and advises Congress on this issue.  He cannot talk much about the subject, what what he DID say was very disturbing.

Also, a single burst of a special EMP nuke 300 miles above the US would wipe out electronics in the whole United States.  It would take months or years to recover.

The first type of EMP would likely be used by AQ, the second, by China.
Link Posted: 8/20/2006 5:57:36 PM EDT
[#1]
The particular episode this was talked about is Future Weapons: Future Shock.  It will be shown again later tonight.
Link Posted: 8/20/2006 5:59:11 PM EDT
[#2]
It is a rerun.  That must be the third or fourth time I have seen it.

Link Posted: 8/20/2006 6:00:30 PM EDT
[#3]
I hate that douche who hosts that show. He is fucking 100% bullshit. Reminds me a lot of the commandos at gunshows.
Link Posted: 8/20/2006 6:01:17 PM EDT
[#4]

Quoted:
I hate that douche who hosts that show. He is fucking 100% bullshit. Reminds me a lot of the commandos at gunshows.


He was a Navy SEAL for ten years.  Look him up.
Link Posted: 8/20/2006 6:03:25 PM EDT
[#5]

Quoted:

Also, a single burst of a special EMP nuke 300 miles above the US would wipe out electronics in the whole United States.  It would take months or years to recover.


Huh??!?!?!  Explain how.
Link Posted: 8/20/2006 6:04:48 PM EDT
[#6]

Quoted:

Quoted:
I hate that douche who hosts that show. He is fucking 100% bullshit. Reminds me a lot of the commandos at gunshows.


He was a Navy SEAL for ten years.  Look him up.


He is still a moron, and frankly doesnt know his shit.
Link Posted: 8/20/2006 6:05:33 PM EDT
[#7]
Read Lights Out.

Link Posted: 8/20/2006 6:07:26 PM EDT
[#8]

Quoted:

Quoted:

Quoted:
I hate that douche who hosts that show. He is fucking 100% bullshit. Reminds me a lot of the commandos at gunshows.


He was a Navy SEAL for ten years.  Look him up.


He is still a moron, and frankly doesnt know his shit.


"I was a sniper in the army!"

I've heard that one before...
Link Posted: 8/20/2006 6:11:05 PM EDT
[#9]
I'm more concerned about thermobarics, personally. Nasty weapons.
Link Posted: 8/20/2006 6:13:08 PM EDT
[#10]
Most of the "future" weapons on that show are at least 20 years old.  

The host is a ham, too.
Link Posted: 8/20/2006 6:13:29 PM EDT
[#11]

Quoted:

Quoted:

Quoted:

Quoted:
I hate that douche who hosts that show. He is fucking 100% bullshit. Reminds me a lot of the commandos at gunshows.


He was a Navy SEAL for ten years.  Look him up.


He is still a moron, and frankly doesnt know his shit.


"I was a sniper in the army!"

I've heard that one before...


Not on a friggin Nationally Broadcast Show.  AuthiSEAL would be all over their ass if he wasn't the real deal.
Link Posted: 8/20/2006 6:14:16 PM EDT
[#12]

Quoted:
Huh??!?!?!  Explain how.

EMP Effects

Link Posted: 8/20/2006 6:18:38 PM EDT
[#13]

Quoted:

Also, a single burst of a special EMP nuke 300 miles above the US would wipe out electronics in the whole United States.  It would take months or years to recover.


I want to know how a terrorist is going to get a nuke 300 miles up. Not happening. Any small emp device would need to be 'detonated' so close to a critical source that you would have to be getting into a restricted area I would think.
Link Posted: 8/20/2006 6:40:54 PM EDT
[#14]
Any nuclear explosion produces EMP, some types of Nuclear explosions have been developed to produce massive EMP and little explosion.

Any nuclear device detonated at the edge of Low Earth orbit would damage a multitude of satellites in that orbit, as well as create particulate matter that they would pass through. and effect the upper reaches of the atmosphere later as these newly charged particles moved back down near the surface.

The effect below on earth would be great too. Frying any unshielded components instantly.

No Power, No Cars, No TV, No Radio, No Phones, No Satellites for .MIL guidance or Communications.
You would have no Idea what happened, who it happened to, what was next, and whether we were even still in control of our country.
Some one would have to walk up to you and tell you why everything is fried and doesnt work.

I love how we put these type of things on TV, Like hey this is what you really need to do next time...

Dirka Derka EMP!

Oh and by the way while your at it, our port security is non existant, and we dont check aircraft cargo..
Link Posted: 8/20/2006 6:41:42 PM EDT
[#15]

Quoted:

Quoted:

Also, a single burst of a special EMP nuke 300 miles above the US would wipe out electronics in the whole United States.  It would take months or years to recover.


I want to know how a terrorist is going to get a nuke 300 miles up. Not happening. Any small emp device would need to be 'detonated' so close to a critical source that you would have to be getting into a restricted area I would think.


Ever Hear of IRAN,
Link Posted: 8/20/2006 6:44:52 PM EDT
[#16]
That guy is too damn annoying for me, whatever happened to the narrated documentary?
Link Posted: 8/20/2006 6:52:36 PM EDT
[#17]
It`s a cool show. I am sure what you see is at least 15 years old too.

Why are we having trouble kicking the shit out of those towel heads then? We need to just erase Iran right now before it`s too late!
Link Posted: 8/20/2006 6:53:29 PM EDT
[#18]

Quoted:

Quoted:

Also, a single burst of a special EMP nuke 300 miles above the US would wipe out electronics in the whole United States.  It would take months or years to recover.


I want to know how a terrorist is going to get a nuke 300 miles up. Not happening. Any small emp device would need to be 'detonated' so close to a critical source that you would have to be getting into a restricted area I would think.


I did not say terrorists would to the 300 mile nuke.  Did you read my post.  I said a country like China may try that.  Regarding the smaller one, you do not have to be in a restricted area.  It has an effective area of a circle 1/8 mile diameter.
Link Posted: 8/20/2006 6:55:30 PM EDT
[#19]

Quoted:

Quoted:

Quoted:

Quoted:

Quoted:
I hate that douche who hosts that show. He is fucking 100% bullshit. Reminds me a lot of the commandos at gunshows.


He was a Navy SEAL for ten years.  Look him up.


He is still a moron, and frankly doesnt know his shit.


"I was a sniper in the army!"

I've heard that one before...


Not on a friggin Nationally Broadcast Show.  AuthiSEAL would be all over their ass if he wasn't the real deal.


I know you haven't watched the show, or atleast payed attention. That's all I'm going to say.
Link Posted: 8/20/2006 6:57:05 PM EDT
[#20]

Quoted:

Quoted:

Quoted:
I hate that douche who hosts that show. He is fucking 100% bullshit. Reminds me a lot of the commandos at gunshows.


He was a Navy SEAL for ten years.  Look him up.


He is still a moron, and frankly doesnt know his shit.


So what makes a Navy Seal an electronics expert


Link Posted: 8/20/2006 6:59:07 PM EDT
[#21]

Quoted:

Quoted:

Quoted:

Also, a single burst of a special EMP nuke 300 miles above the US would wipe out electronics in the whole United States.  It would take months or years to recover.


I want to know how a terrorist is going to get a nuke 300 miles up. Not happening. Any small emp device would need to be 'detonated' so close to a critical source that you would have to be getting into a restricted area I would think.


Ever Hear of IRAN,


http://regimechangeiran.blogspot.com/2005/04/iran-military-journal-eyes-nuclear-emp.html


In the latest evidence Iran is seriously planning an unconventional pre-emptive nuclear strike against the U.S., an Iranian military journal has publicly considered the idea of launching an electromagnetic pulse attack as the key to defeating the world's lone superpower. READ MORE

Congress was warned of Iran's plans last month by Peter Pry, a senior staffer with the Commission to Assess the Threat to the United States from Electromagnetic Pulse Attack in a hearing of Sen. John Kyl's subcommittee on terrorism, technology and homeland security.

In an article titled, "Electronics to Determine Fate of Future Wars," the journal explains how an EMP attack on America's electronic infrastructure, caused by the detonation of a nuclear weapon high above the U.S., would bring the country to its knees.

"Once you confuse the enemy communication network you can also disrupt the work of the enemy command- and decision-making center," the article states. "Even worse today when you disable a country's military high command through disruption of communications, you will, in effect, disrupt all the affairs of that country. If the world's industrial countries fail to devise effective ways to defend themselves against dangerous electronic assaults then they will disintegrate within a few years. American soldiers would not be able to find food to eat nor would they be able to fire a single shot."

WND reported the Iranian threat last Monday explaining Tehran is not only covertly developing nuclear weapons, it is already testing ballistic missiles specifically designed to destroy America's technical infrastructure. The report was published first in Joseph Farah's G2 Bulletin, a premium, online intelligence newsletter by WND's founder.

Pry pointed out the Iranians have been testing mid-air detonations of their Shahab-3 medium-range missile over the Caspian Sea. The missiles were fired from ships.

"A nuclear missile concealed in the hold of a freighter would give Iran or terrorists the capability to perform an EMP attack against the United States homeland without developing an ICBM and with some prospect of remaining anonymous," explained Pry. "Iran's Shahab-3 medium range missile mentioned earlier is a mobile missile and small enough to be transported in the hold of a freighter. We cannot rule out that Iran, the world's leading sponsor of international terrorism might provide terrorists with the means to executive an EMP attack against the United States."

Lowell Wood, acting chairman of the commission, said yesterday that such an attack – by Iran or some other actor – could cripple the U.S. by knocking out electrical power, computers, circuit boards controlling most automobiles and trucks, banking systems, communications and food and water supplies.

"No one can say just how long systems would be down," he said. "It could be weeks, months or even years."

EMP attacks are generated when a nuclear weapon is detonated at altitudes above a few dozen kilometers above the earth's surface. The explosion, of even a small nuclear warhead, would produce a set of electromagnetic pulses that interact with the earth's atmosphere and the earth's magnetic field.

"These electromagnetic pulses propagate from the burst point of the nuclear weapon to the line of sight on the earth's horizon, potentially covering a vast geographic region in doing so simultaneously, moreover, at the speed of light," said Wood. "For example, a nuclear weapon detonated at an altitude of 400 kilometers over the central United States would cover, with its primary electromagnetic pulse, the entire continent of the United States and parts of Canada and Mexico."

The commission, in its work over a period of several years, found that EMP is one of a small number of threats that has the potential to hold American society seriously at risk and that might also result in the defeat of U.S. military forces.

"The electromagnetic field pulses produced by weapons designed and deployed with the intent to produce EMP have a high likelihood of damaging electrical power systems, electronics and information systems upon which any reasonably advanced society, most specifically including our own, depend vitally," Wood said. "Their effects on systems and infrastructures dependent on electricity and electronics could be sufficiently ruinous as to qualify as catastrophic to the American nation."

Wood warned of the potential for unprecedented cascading failures of major electronic and electrical infrastructures.

"In such events, a regional or national recovery would be long and difficult and would seriously degrade the overall viability of the American nation and the safety and even the lives of very large numbers of U.S. citizens," he said.

Strategic EMP attacks on the U.S. have also been considered and discussed recently by China and post-Soviet Union Russia, according to the commission. Yet, the more imminent threat, according to William R. Graham, former chairman of the commission, and Wood, comes from rogue states such as Iran and North Korea and their terrorist allies.

"The current vulnerability of critical U.S. infrastructures can both invite and reward such attacks if not corrected," Wood said. "I might add that extreme, sustained vulnerability entices such attack. However, correction is feasible and well within the nation's tactical means and material resources to accomplish. Most critical infrastructure vulnerabilities can be reduced below those levels that potentially invite attempts to create a national catastrophe. By protecting key elements in each critical infrastructure and by preparing to recover essential services, the prospects for a terrorist of rogue state being to impose large-scale, long-term damage on the United States could be minimized."

The commission estimated that major corrections could be made in the next three to five years that would greatly reduce America's vulnerability to an EMP attack. There is concern within the commission, however, that the EMP threat is not being taken seriously by the Department of Homeland Security.

Peter Fonash, acting deputy manager for the National Communications System in the Department of Homeland Security, said the agency has "determined that there is minimal EMP effect."

While the Department of Defense has received briefings from the commission at the highest levels, DHS has not, say commission members.

"We haven't had equivalent briefings like that with the Department of Homeland Security yet," said Pry at last month's congressional hearing.

Since there has never been a large-scale EMP attack anywhere in the world to evaluate, the assessments are based on extrapolation of available data gathered from small-scale nuclear experiments.

Wood said an actual EMP attack on the United States minimally would result in $20 billion in damages, no loss of life and just a great deal of inconvenience. However, on the other end of the scale, it could "literally destroy the American nation and might cause the deaths of 90 percent of its people and set us back a century or more in time as far as our ability to function as a society."

Wood agreed with Graham, who said he could think of no other reason Iran would be experimenting with high-altitude detonations of missiles besides planning for an EMP attack.

Jerome Corsi, author of "Atomic Iran," told WorldNetDaily the new findings about Iran's electromagnetic pulse experiments significantly raise the stakes of the mullah regime's bid to become a nuclear power.

"Up until now, I believed the nuclear threat to the U.S. from Iran was limited to the ability of terrorists to penetrate the borders or port security to deliver a device to a major city," he said. "While that threat should continue to be a grave concern for every American, these tests by Iran demonstrate just how devious the fanatical mullahs in Tehran are. We are facing a clever and unscrupulous adversary in Iran that could bring America to its knees."

The commission said hardening key infrastructure systems and procuring vital backup equipment such as transformers is both feasible and – compared with the threat – relatively inexpensive.

Link Posted: 8/20/2006 6:59:23 PM EDT
[#22]

Quoted:

Quoted:

Quoted:

Quoted:
I hate that douche who hosts that show. He is fucking 100% bullshit. Reminds me a lot of the commandos at gunshows.


He was a Navy SEAL for ten years.  Look him up.


He is still a moron, and frankly doesnt know his shit.


So what makes a Navy Seal an electronics expert




Watch one whole episode (if you can). My 3 year old cousin could host the show better than him.
Link Posted: 8/20/2006 7:00:43 PM EDT
[#23]

Quoted:

Quoted:

Quoted:

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Quoted:
I hate that douche who hosts that show. He is fucking 100% bullshit. Reminds me a lot of the commandos at gunshows.


He was a Navy SEAL for ten years.  Look him up.


He is still a moron, and frankly doesnt know his shit.


So what makes a Navy Seal an electronics expert




Watch one whole episode (if you can). My 3 year old cousin could host the show better than him.


He's not an electronics experts.  He interviews experts.  You all been drinking?
Link Posted: 8/20/2006 7:03:48 PM EDT
[#24]

Quoted:

He's not an electronics experts.  He interviews so-called experts.



Fixed it for you.  
Link Posted: 8/20/2006 7:05:19 PM EDT
[#25]
Well I remember a few months ago the Iranians tested several of their longest range missiles that exploded several hundred miles up and our experts said they were failures but  the Iranians said they were a success.

One of those launched from a freighter with a North Korean nuke on top would sure do it.

Speach to congress about EMP : commdocs.house.gov/committees/security/has197010.000/has197010_1.HTM


A high altitude nuke detenation is just like a REALLY INCREDIBLY STRONG solar flair. The power grid fries , all those big ass transformers gone - the big ones are custom made and would take a year or so replace. You p.c's and laptops wont work niether will cell phones , cars and trucks with electronic ignition, radios , tv's, ect.

Any kind of I.C. or microcircuit fried unless shielded . It won't effect old style electrical stuff like vacume tubes or simple switches and wiring but anything thats higher tech than that will be toast. If you want to drive you better have an old car or truck with points ignition.

Old but still interesting:

Electromagnetic Pulse-From Chaos To A Manageable Solution

The official pamphlet from the U.S.Army Corps of Enginers: READ IT!!!

US Army Corps of Engineers  Pamphlet EP 1110-3-2 - "Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) and Tempest Protection for Facilities"; a 467 page technical manual!

Oh yes I keep a generator , laptop and several radios in a simple faraday cage just incase.
Link Posted: 8/20/2006 7:09:29 PM EDT
[#26]

Quoted:

Quoted:

He's not an electronics experts.  He interviews so-called experts.



Fixed it for you.  


Well, regarding EMP, the expert is the world's leading expert, an ex-Navy Commander, considered to be expert enough to advise Congress.  But I guess that doesn't count, does it?  Or when he interviewed the man who invented the MetalStorm weapon system, that didn't mean anything, either.  Or, when he interview Mr. Barrett himself about the 50 cal gun, that man must know little about 50 cals.  Or when he went to Yuma and talked to the inventor of the cave clearing thermobaric bombs we now used, she must have just learned everything she knows from the internet.  Damn.
Link Posted: 8/20/2006 7:10:12 PM EDT
[#27]

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He said the Russians had built some the size of soda cans
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That's pretty funny.

Link Posted: 8/20/2006 7:10:17 PM EDT
[#28]

Quoted:
Well I remember a few months ago the Iranians tested several of their longest range missiles that exploded several hundred miles up and our experts said they were failures but  the Iranians said they were a success.

One of those launched from a freighter with a North Korean nuke on top would sure do it.

Speach to congress about EMP : commdocs.house.gov/committees/security/has197010.000/has197010_1.HTM


China is the biggest threat for that sort of attack, in my opinioin.
Link Posted: 8/20/2006 7:12:55 PM EDT
[#29]

Quoted:

Quoted:
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He said the Russians had built some the size of soda cans
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That's pretty funny.



And its true.  Unless that former Navy Commander, adviser to congress, is lying.  Do you think that man is lying?  I heard him say it.  Check out his credentials.  I bet they are probably a little heavy duty.  But you must have access to all classified information, so you can discount what he says, right?
Link Posted: 8/20/2006 7:20:30 PM EDT
[#30]
www.fas.org/nuke/intro/nuke/emp/toc.htm

The energy band in a nuke EMP is fairly long wave and the effect on cars and other small objects [objects that are a fraction of the wavelength of the radiated energy] would not suffer nearly to the degree expressed in the popular media.

It's fun to scare ourselves with tho.
Link Posted: 8/20/2006 7:24:35 PM EDT
[#31]

Quoted:
www.fas.org/nuke/intro/nuke/emp/toc.htm

The energy band in a nuke EMP is fairly long wave and the effect on cars and other small objects [objects that are a fraction of the wavelength of the radiated energy] would not suffer nearly to the degree expressed in the popular media.

It's fun to scare ourselves with tho.


What he was talking about was NNEMP (Non-nuclear EMP devices).  Very small, but very devestating to nearby electronics.  I saw the demonstration of such a device.  The same device disabled a small electronics device as well as an automobile.  Oddly enough, the car's power windows still worked, but you could not start it.
Link Posted: 8/20/2006 7:33:38 PM EDT
[#32]
height=8
Quoted:
height=8
Quoted:
Well I remember a few months ago the Iranians tested several of their longest range missiles that exploded several hundred miles up and our experts said they were failures but  the Iranians said they were a success.

One of those launched from a freighter with a North Korean nuke on top would sure do it.

Speach to congress about EMP : commdocs.house.gov/committees/security/has197010.000/has197010_1.HTM


China is the biggest threat for that sort of attack, in my opinioin.


I should of said an Iranian freighter.
Link Posted: 8/20/2006 7:36:09 PM EDT
[#33]

Quoted:

Quoted:
www.fas.org/nuke/intro/nuke/emp/toc.htm

The energy band in a nuke EMP is fairly long wave and the effect on cars and other small objects [objects that are a fraction of the wavelength of the radiated energy] would not suffer nearly to the degree expressed in the popular media.

It's fun to scare ourselves with tho.


What he was talking about was NNEMP (Non-nuclear EMP devices).  Very small, but very devestating to nearby electronics.  I saw the demonstration of such a device.  The same device disabled a small electronics device as well as an automobile.  Oddly enough, the car's power windows still worked, but you could not start it.

The NNEMP devices use a HE to compress a charged inductor and emit a powerful HIGH FREQUENCY EMP generally in the [very shortwave] UHF to microwave spectrum.

The effect is localized and the explosive effect of detonating the device is destructive and also localized.

No one's stuff a short distance away is going to be destroyed or deactivated.

Close up NNEMP MIGHT take out your LED SureFire.

NNEMP is a very useful tool for taking out radar sites, nearby cars' electronic systems, etc. But not something most of us have to be generally concerned with.
Link Posted: 8/20/2006 7:51:48 PM EDT
[#34]

Quoted:

Quoted:

Quoted:
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He said the Russians had built some the size of soda cans
.
.
.


That's pretty funny.



And its true.  Unless that former Navy Commander, adviser to congress, is lying.  Do you think that man is lying?  I heard him say it.  Check out his credentials.  I bet they are probably a little heavy duty.  But you must have access to all classified information, so you can discount what he says, right?


Nope, no access to all classified information.  I have news for you - former Navy Commnaders don't have access, either, and when they are debriefed they are reminded that the secrets they have been given access to know remain secrets forever.  Even if the government declassifies them later, that does not give a debriefed person permission to disclose his knowledge.

So, he's either a felon or a BS'er.  Could be both.

Besides, in this case, it's not required; just how much energy do you suppose can be packed in a non-nuke soda can sized container along with an aperature?  The operating wavelength of the device is very short, maybe too short to affect anything but a flashlight.
Link Posted: 8/20/2006 8:00:36 PM EDT
[#35]

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I hate that douche who hosts that show. He is fucking 100% bullshit. Reminds me a lot of the commandos at gunshows.


He was a Navy SEAL for ten years.  Look him up.


He is still a moron, and frankly doesnt know his shit.



"This is the .308 round- fired by the AK-47...."  ACK!  And with his hyper-dramatic presentation the guy will be the next host of World's Wildest Police Videos.

Ronnie Barret was cool though, "When you get hit with a round this size...you are down.
Link Posted: 8/20/2006 8:12:04 PM EDT
[#36]

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Quoted:

Quoted:
I hate that douche who hosts that show. He is fucking 100% bullshit. Reminds me a lot of the commandos at gunshows.


He was a Navy SEAL for ten years.  Look him up.


He is still a moron, and frankly doesnt know his shit.



"This is the .308 round- fired by the AK-47...."  ACK!  And with his hyper-dramatic presentation the guy will be the next host of World's Wildest Police Videos.

Ronnie Barret was cool though, "When you get hit with a round this size...you are down.


Not to mention calling an F-16 an F-15, and there was another one that I've already purged m head of. An ex-seal should know his shit far, far better than that twit does.
Link Posted: 8/20/2006 11:22:33 PM EDT
[#37]
Will an EMP take out an EOTech?  If so can I get a rail mounted Faraday cage for mine?
Link Posted: 8/20/2006 11:38:48 PM EDT
[#38]

Quoted:

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Also, a single burst of a special EMP nuke 300 miles above the US would wipe out electronics in the whole United States.  It would take months or years to recover.


I want to know how a terrorist is going to get a nuke 300 miles up. Not happening. Any small emp device would need to be 'detonated' so close to a critical source that you would have to be getting into a restricted area I would think.


Re-read the OP. The contention is that terrorists could use the SODA CAN biggish one to paralyze a small target area. The orbital device would be used by a nation with the capability to put it in orbit. Scary thing about EMP bombs is Scientific American or something showed EVERYONE how you could make a "city-crippler" for like $400 worth of materials......


Scott


Link Posted: 8/20/2006 11:48:07 PM EDT
[#39]

Quoted:

Quoted:
I hate that douche who hosts that show. He is fucking 100% bullshit. Reminds me a lot of the commandos at gunshows.


He was a Navy SEAL for ten years.  Look him up.


He's a freaking joke. He says he is an ex-navy seal sniper.... but tonight when he was talking about the barrett .50... he remarked "retracting the bolt and chambering a round on a bolt action rifle can take 10-15 seconds." Are you shitting me... 10-15 second to chamber a round on a bolt gun. BS!!!!
Link Posted: 8/21/2006 3:00:19 AM EDT
[#40]
I'm sure a state with a rocket and nuclear program could do some EMP damage, but I doubt any of the portable, simple, cheap stuff is possible.  If it were, the Iraqis would have popped one off in Bagdad to even things up with the tech heavy US forces.  
Link Posted: 8/21/2006 9:36:08 AM EDT
[#41]
Oh great, yeah, not gonna happen right.

Just like the iraqis were all supposed to be in uniform when they want to fight, Not strapping 105mm shells and c4 in the trunk of a shitty cab.

US Nuclear test Starfish Prime:
The effects of an EMP were not fully known until 1962. At this time, the United States was conducting a series of high-altitude atmospheric tests, code named "Fishbowl."

The nuclear explosion, "Starfish Prime," which was detonated in the Pacific Ocean 800 miles from Hawaii, caused an EMP that disrupted radio stations and electrical equipment throughout Hawaii.

Consequently, in 1963, the United States and the Soviet Union signed the Atmospheric Test Ban Treaty to counter the considerable threat posed by EMPs.

An electromagnetic pulse starts with a short, intense burst of gamma rays produced from nuclear detonation. The gamma rays interact with the atoms in air molecules through a process called the Compton effect, wherein electrons are scattered at high energies, thus ionizing the atmosphere and generating a powerful electrical field. The strength of the EMP depends highly on the altitude at which it is released. At altitudes above 30,000m, it is the strongest. It is also significant at surface or low altitude bursts, but is not as effective between the two extremes.

Although the electric field created from an EMP lasts for only a short time, its effects can be devastating. It is predicted that a single high altitude burst 200 miles above Kansas could propagate an EMP enveloping the entire United States.



A Poor Man's E-Bomb
An FCG (flux compression generator), is an astoundingly simple weapon.  It consists of an explosives-packed tube placed inside a slightly larger copper coil, as shown.  The instant before the chemical explosive is detonated, the coil is energized by a bank of capacitors, creating a magnetic field.  The explosive charge detonates from the rear forward.  As the tube flares outward it touches the edge of the coil, thereby creating a moving short circuit.  "The propagating short has the effect of compressing the magnetic field while reducing the inductance of the stator [coil]", says Kopp : "the result is that FCGs will produce a ramping current pulse, which breaks before the final disintegration of the device — published results suggest ramp times of tens of hundreds of microseconds and peak currents of tens of millions of amps".  The pulse that emerges makes a lightning bolt seem like a flashbulb by comparison ....
Link Posted: 8/21/2006 9:38:03 AM EDT
[#42]

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Quoted:

Quoted:
www.fas.org/nuke/intro/nuke/emp/toc.htm

The energy band in a nuke EMP is fairly long wave and the effect on cars and other small objects [objects that are a fraction of the wavelength of the radiated energy] would not suffer nearly to the degree expressed in the popular media.

It's fun to scare ourselves with tho.


What he was talking about was NNEMP (Non-nuclear EMP devices).  Very small, but very devestating to nearby electronics.  I saw the demonstration of such a device.  The same device disabled a small electronics device as well as an automobile.  Oddly enough, the car's power windows still worked, but you could not start it.

The NNEMP devices use a HE to compress a charged inductor and emit a powerful HIGH FREQUENCY EMP generally in the [very shortwave] UHF to microwave spectrum.

The effect is localized and the explosive effect of detonating the device is destructive and also localized.

No one's stuff a short distance away is going to be destroyed or deactivated.

Close up NNEMP MIGHT take out your LED SureFire.

NNEMP is a very useful tool for taking out radar sites, nearby cars' electronic systems, etc. But not something most of us have to be generally concerned with.


Well,  if you set off one in an airport and make it so that the planes can't land and run out of fuel, that could be a problem.
Link Posted: 8/21/2006 9:43:39 AM EDT
[#43]
Report: Iran plans electro-magnetic pulse attack on USA with high-altitude nuke

Iran plans to knock out U.S. with 1 nuclear bomb


Tests missiles for electro-magnetic pulse weapon that could destroy America's technical infrastructure
Posted: April 25, 2005

Editor's note: Joseph Farah's G2 Bulletin is an online, subscription intelligence news service from the creator of WorldNetDaily.com – a journalist who has been developing sources around the world for almost 30 years.

By Joseph Farah
2005 WorldNetDaily.com

http://www.worldnetdaily.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=43956

WASHINGTON -- Iran is not only covertly developing nuclear weapons, it is already testing ballistic missiles specifically designed to destroy America's technical infrastructure, effectively neutralizing the world's lone superpower, say U.S. intelligence sources, top scientists and western missile industry experts.

The radical Shiite regime has conducted successful tests to determine if its Shahab-3 ballistic missiles, capable of carrying a nuclear warhead, can be detonated by a remote-control device while still in high-altitude flight.

Scientists, including President Reagan's top science adviser, William R. Graham, say there is no other explanation for such tests than preparation for the deployment of Electromagnetic Pulse weapons – even one of which could knock out America's critical electrical and technological infrastructure, effectively sending the continental U.S. back to the 19th century with a recovery time of months or years.

Iran will have that capability – at least theoretically – as soon as it has one nuclear bomb ready to arm such a missile. North Korea, a strategic ally of Iran, already boasts such capability.

The stunning report was first published over the weekend in Joseph Farah's G2 Bulletin, the premium, online intelligence newsletter published by WND's founder.

Just last month, Congress heard testimony about the use of such weapons and the threat they pose from rogue regimes.

Iran has surprised intelligence analysts by describing the mid-flight detonations of missiles fired from ships on the Caspian Sea as "successful" tests. Even primitive Scud missiles could be used for this purpose. And top U.S. intelligence officials reminded members of Congress that there is a glut of these missiles on the world market. They are currently being bought and sold for about $100,000 apiece.

"A terrorist organization might have trouble putting a nuclear warhead 'on target' with a Scud, but it would be much easier to simply launch and detonate in the atmosphere," wrote Sen. John Kyl, R-Ariz., in the Washington Post a week ago. "No need for the risk and difficulty of trying to smuggle a nuclear weapon over the border or hit a particular city. Just launch a cheap missile from a freighter in international waters – al-Qaida is believed to own about 80 such vessels – and make sure to get it a few miles in the air."

The Iranian missile tests were more sophisticated and capable of detonation at higher elevations – making them more dangerous.

Detonated at a height of 60 to 500 kilometers above the continental U.S., one nuclear warhead could cripple the country – knocking out electrical power and circuit boards and rendering the U.S. domestic communications impotent.

While Iran still insists officially in talks currently underway with the European Union that it is only developing nuclear power for peaceful civilian purposes, the mid-flight detonation missile tests persuade U.S. military planners and intelligence agencies that Tehran can only be planning such an attack, which depends on the availability of at least one nuclear warhead.

Some analysts believe the stage of Iranian missile developments suggests Iranian scientists will move toward the production of weapons-grade nuclear material shortly as soon as its nuclear reactor in Busher is operative.

Jerome Corsi, author of "Atomic Iran," told WorldNetDaily the new findings about Iran's Electromagnetic Pulse experiments significantly raise the stakes of the mullah regime's bid to become a nuclear power.

"Up until now, I believed the nuclear threat to the U.S. from Iran was limited to the ability of terrorists to penetrate the borders or port security to deliver a device to a major city," he said. "While that threat should continue to be a grave concern for every American, these tests by Iran demonstrate just how devious the fanatical mullahs in Tehran are. We are facing a clever and unscrupulous adversary in Iran that could bring America to its knees."

Earlier this week, Iran's top nuclear official said Europe must heed an Iranian proposal on uranium enrichment or risk a collapse of the talks.

The warning by Hassan Rowhani, head of the Supreme National Security Council, came as diplomats from Britain, France and Germany began talks with their Iranian counterparts in Geneva, ahead of a more senior-level meeting in London set for April 29. Enrichment produces fuel for nuclear reactors, which can also be used in the explosive core of nuclear bombs.

"The Europeans should tell us whether these ideas can work as the basis for continued negotiations or not," Rowhani said, referring to the Iranian proposal put forward last month that would allow some uranium enrichment. "If yes, fine. If not, then the negotiations cannot continue," he said.

Some analysts believe Iran is using the negotiations merely to buy time for further development of the nuclear program.

The U.S. plans, according to Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, to allow the EU talks to continue before deciding this summer to push for United Nations sanctions against Iran.

Last month, the Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Terrorism, Technology and Homeland Security chaired by Kyl, held a hearing on the Electromagnetic Pulse, or EMP, threat.

"An electromagnetic pulse (EMP) attack on the American homeland, said one of the distinguished scientists who testified at the hearing, is one of only a few ways that the United States could be defeated by its enemies – terrorist or otherwise," wrote Kyl "And it is probably the easiest. A single Scud missile, carrying a single nuclear weapon, detonated at the appropriate altitude, would interact with the Earth's atmosphere, producing an electromagnetic pulse radiating down to the surface at the speed of light. Depending on the location and size of the blast, the effect would be to knock out already stressed power grids and other electrical systems across much or even all of the continental United States, for months if not years."

The purpose of an EMP attack, unlike a nuclear attack on land, is not to kill people, but "to kill electrons," as Graham explained. He serves as chairman of the Commission to Assess the Threat to the United States from Electromagnetic Pulse Attack and was director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and science adviser to the president during the Reagan administration.

Graham told WorldNetDaily he could think of no other reason for Iran to be experimenting with mid-air detonation of missiles than for the planning of an EMP-style attack.

"EMP offers a bigger bang for the buck," he said. He also suggested such an attack makes a U.S. nuclear response against a suspected enemy less likely than the detonation of a nuclear bomb in a major U.S. city.

A 2004 report by the commission found "several potential adversaries have or can acquire the capability to attack the United States with a high-altitude nuclear weapons-generated electromagnetic pulse (EMP). A determined adversary can achieve an EMP attack capability without having a high level of sophistication."

"EMP is one of a small number of threats that can hold our society at risk of catastrophic consequences," the report said. "EMP will cover the wide geographic region within line of sight to the nuclear weapon. It has the capability to produce significant damage to critical infrastructures and thus to the very fabric of U.S. society, as well as to the ability of the United States and Western nations to project influence and military power."

The major impact of EMP weapons is on electronics, "so pervasive in all aspects of our society and military, coupled through critical infrastructures," explained the report.

"Their effects on systems and infrastructures dependent on electricity and electronics could be sufficiently ruinous as to qualify as catastrophic to the nation," Lowell Wood, acting chairman of the commission, told members of Congress.

The commission report went so far as to suggest, in its opening sentence, that an EMP attack "might result in the defeat of our military forces."

"Briefly, a single nuclear weapon exploded at high altitude above the United States will interact with the Earth's atmosphere, ionosphere and magnetic field to produce an electromagnetic pulse (EMP) radiation down to the Earth and additionally create electrical currents in the Earth," said the report. "EMP effects are both direct and indirect. The former are due to electrical systems, and the latter arise from the damage that 'shocked' – upset, damaged and destroyed – electronics controls then inflict on the systems in which they are embedded. The indirect effects can be even more severe than the direct effects."

The EMP threat is not a new one considered by U.S. defense planners. The Soviet Union had experimented with the idea as a kind of super-weapon against the U.S.

"What is different now is that some potential sources of EMP threats are difficult to deter – they can be terrorist groups that have no state identity, have only one or a few weapons and are motivated to attack the U.S. without regard for their own safety," explains the commission report. "Rogue states, such as North Korea and Iran, may also be developing the capability to pose an EMP threat to the United States and may also be unpredictable and difficult to deter."

Graham describes the potential "cascading effect" of an EMP attack. If electrical power is knocked out and circuit boards fried, telecommunications are disrupted, energy deliveries are impeded, the financial system breaks down, food, water and gasoline become scarce.

As Kyl put it: "Few if any people would die right away. But the loss of power would have a cascading effect on all aspects of U.S. society. Communication would be largely impossible. Lack of refrigeration would leave food rotting in warehouses, exacerbated by a lack of transportation as those vehicles still working simply ran out of gas (which is pumped with electricity). The inability to sanitize and distribute water would quickly threaten public health, not to mention the safety of anyone in the path of the inevitable fires, which would rage unchecked. And as we have seen in areas of natural and other disasters, such circumstances often result in a fairly rapid breakdown of social order."

"American society has grown so dependent on computer and other electrical systems that we have created our own Achilles' heel of vulnerability, ironically much greater than those of other, less developed nations," the senator wrote. "When deprived of power, we are in many ways helpless, as the New York City blackout made clear. In that case, power was restored quickly because adjacent areas could provide help. But a large-scale burnout caused by a broad EMP attack would create a much more difficult situation. Not only would there be nobody nearby to help, it could take years to replace destroyed equipment."

The commission said hardening key infrastructure systems and procuring vital backup equipment such as transformers is both feasible and – compared with the threat – relatively inexpensive.

"But it will take leadership by the Department of Homeland Security, the Defense Department, and other federal agencies, along with support from Congress, all of which have yet to materialize," wrote Kyl, so far the only elected official blowing the whistle this alarming development.

Kyl concluded in his report: "The Sept. 11 commission report stated that our biggest failure was one of 'imagination.' No one imagined that terrorists would do what they did on Sept. 11. Today few Americans can conceive of the possibility that terrorists could bring our society to its knees by destroying everything we rely on that runs on electricity. But this time we've been warned, and we'd better be prepared to respond."

Link Posted: 8/21/2006 9:44:05 AM EDT
[#44]

Quoted:

Quoted:

Also, a single burst of a special EMP nuke 300 miles above the US would wipe out electronics in the whole United States.  It would take months or years to recover.


I want to know how a terrorist is going to get a nuke 300 miles up. Not happening. Any small emp device would need to be 'detonated' so close to a critical source that you would have to be getting into a restricted area I would think.


Not really. Just the other side of a wall. Our servers at work are in a locked restricted room. yet the hallway right beside it isn't.... boom/lights out.
Link Posted: 8/21/2006 10:01:00 AM EDT
[#45]
Popular Mechanics
September, 2001 thats how long they have been talking about it

superconductors.org/emp-bomb.htm
Link Posted: 8/21/2006 12:48:41 PM EDT
[#46]

Quoted:
Oh great, yeah, not gonna happen right.

unitedstatesaction.com/e-bomb.gif

A Poor Man's E-Bomb
An FCG (flux compression generator), is an astoundingly simple weapon.  It consists of an explosives-packed tube placed inside a slightly larger copper coil, as shown.  The instant before the chemical explosive is detonated, the coil is energized by a bank of capacitors, creating a magnetic field.  The explosive charge detonates from the rear forward.  As the tube flares outward it touches the edge of the coil, thereby creating a moving short circuit.  "The propagating short has the effect of compressing the magnetic field while reducing the inductance of the stator [coil]", says Kopp : "the result is that FCGs will produce a ramping current pulse, which breaks before the final disintegration of the device — published results suggest ramp times of tens of hundreds of microseconds and peak currents of tens of millions of amps".  The pulse that emerges makes a lightning bolt seem like a flashbulb by comparison ....


Note that the condensers are missing from the "pop can size" package show here ...
Link Posted: 8/21/2006 1:01:59 PM EDT
[#47]
That show has some info. but the host sucks.

For real news you have to look in other places. Even if it seems strange.

CSPAN2 had Lockheed Martin Skunk works live in Washington last week showing off some new declassified toys that they are recommending for mass production.

One of the new aircraft's was a submarine launched fighter/bomber drone, that was launched from a missile tube.
Link Posted: 8/21/2006 3:26:27 PM EDT
[#48]

Quoted:
That show has some info. but the host sucks.

For real news you have to look in other places. Even if it seems strange.

CSPAN2 had Lockheed Martin Skunk works live in Washington last week showing off some new declassified toys that they are recommending for mass production.

One of the new aircraft's was a submarine launched fighter/bomber drone, that was launched from a missile tube.


Cormorant


Link Posted: 8/21/2006 4:51:21 PM EDT
[#49]

Quoted:

Quoted:
Oh great, yeah, not gonna happen right.

unitedstatesaction.com/e-bomb.gif

A Poor Man's E-Bomb
An FCG (flux compression generator), is an astoundingly simple weapon.  It consists of an explosives-packed tube placed inside a slightly larger copper coil, as shown.  The instant before the chemical explosive is detonated, the coil is energized by a bank of capacitors, creating a magnetic field.  The explosive charge detonates from the rear forward.  As the tube flares outward it touches the edge of the coil, thereby creating a moving short circuit.  "The propagating short has the effect of compressing the magnetic field while reducing the inductance of the stator [coil]", says Kopp : "the result is that FCGs will produce a ramping current pulse, which breaks before the final disintegration of the device — published results suggest ramp times of tens of hundreds of microseconds and peak currents of tens of millions of amps".  The pulse that emerges makes a lightning bolt seem like a flashbulb by comparison ....


Note that the condensers are missing from the "pop can size" package show here ...


Think outside the box.  What if the Russians figure out a away to generate a huge amount of electricity for a very, very short period of time.  They wouldn't need condensors.
Link Posted: 8/22/2006 2:52:25 AM EDT
[#50]

Quoted:

Quoted:

Quoted:
Oh great, yeah, not gonna happen right.

unitedstatesaction.com/e-bomb.gif

A Poor Man's E-Bomb
An FCG (flux compression generator), is an astoundingly simple weapon.  It consists of an explosives-packed tube placed inside a slightly larger copper coil, as shown.  The instant before the chemical explosive is detonated, the coil is energized by a bank of capacitors, creating a magnetic field.  The explosive charge detonates from the rear forward.  As the tube flares outward it touches the edge of the coil, thereby creating a moving short circuit.  "The propagating short has the effect of compressing the magnetic field while reducing the inductance of the stator [coil]", says Kopp : "the result is that FCGs will produce a ramping current pulse, which breaks before the final disintegration of the device — published results suggest ramp times of tens of hundreds of microseconds and peak currents of tens of millions of amps".  The pulse that emerges makes a lightning bolt seem like a flashbulb by comparison ....


Note that the condensers are missing from the "pop can size" package show here ...


Think outside the box.  What if the Russians figure out a away to generate a huge amount of electricity for a very, very short period of time.  They wouldn't need condensors.


These coil / condenser devices with a super fast field generation are that way, and a condenser is required to store the necessary energy until the event.

That's all I have to say about the topic.
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