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Posted: 4/24/2015 1:59:59 AM EDT
I did when I was very young.  I just started looking into kits for my kids and I.  Did they just completely die out?  Used to be able to get a Cox .049 kit for 40 bucks or so, and there were about a dozen different models to choose from.  

Link Posted: 4/24/2015 2:09:43 AM EDT
[#1]
Quoted:
I did when I was very young.  I just started looking into kits for my kids and I.  Did they just completely die out?  Used to be able to get a Cox .049 kit for 40 bucks or so, and there were about a dozen different models to choose from.  

View Quote


Yup, my cousin had one but they got boring quickly going around in circles.
Link Posted: 4/24/2015 2:11:04 AM EDT
[#2]
I did when I was a kid. I'm surprised they don't make them anymore.
I fly RC now.
Link Posted: 4/24/2015 2:11:09 AM EDT
[#3]
when I was a wee lad.  had a Cox P40
Link Posted: 4/24/2015 2:12:04 AM EDT
[#4]
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Quoted:
when I was a wee lad.  had a Cox P40
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I had the Corsair for a little while until I crashed it.
Link Posted: 4/24/2015 2:14:58 AM EDT
[#5]
I had some that Grandpa helped me build (or, more accurately, did all the building and kept telling me not to touch anything).

They're old O49 engines and it's impossible to get glow plugs for them locally anymore.  I have a big one with an OS-40 hanging on the garage wall.  Never could do more than fly it level.
Link Posted: 4/24/2015 2:17:31 AM EDT
[#6]
I built a nice balsa wood F4U Corsair and had it for a while before crashing it.

It turned out pretty well, but didn't last all that long.  This was back in the 70s and so it had a gaser.

Chris
Link Posted: 4/24/2015 2:21:37 AM EDT
[#7]
My cousin and I built a big balsa F4U Corsairs and used a huge rubber band motor then took the little rocket tubes out of Saturn Missile boxes and glued them under the wings. It would fly around in random directions and fire rockets. Shit was bad ass.
Link Posted: 4/24/2015 2:22:08 AM EDT
[#8]
check out Flitetest.com.

Not the type of plane you are talking about but for about the same investment you can have an RC plane that flies really well and they are easy to repair. Kids and you could build them together and then fly them together.
Link Posted: 4/24/2015 2:31:04 AM EDT
[#9]
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Quoted:

I had the Corsair for a little while until I crashed it.
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Quoted:
Quoted:
when I was a wee lad.  had a Cox P40

I had the Corsair for a little while until I crashed it.


I had the P-39.  They were great fun.  You could let your kids (me, at the time) fly them and beat them half to death, then fix them with baking soda and superglue. Then as they progressed you could start introducing balsa models.  The only things I can find now are 2d flimsy plastic electric models.  
Link Posted: 4/24/2015 2:31:52 AM EDT
[#10]
Quoted:
Used to be able to get a Cox .049 kit for 40 bucks or so
View Quote


With 2.4 GHz 4-channel all-electric quadracopters going for under 35 bucks, it's kind of hard to sell the idea of swinging a finicky gas-powered plane round and round on the end of a few dozen feet of fishing line...

Incidentally, $40 in 1975 would be around $175 today.
Link Posted: 4/24/2015 2:32:34 AM EDT
[#11]
probably TOO DANGEROUS for today's nanny society
Link Posted: 4/24/2015 2:33:57 AM EDT
[#12]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


With 2.4 GHz 4-channel all-electric quadracopters going for under 35 bucks, it's kind of hard to sell the idea of swinging a finicky gas-powered plane round and round on the end of a few dozen feet of fishing line...

Incidentally, $40 in 1975 would be around $175 today.
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Quoted:
Quoted:
Used to be able to get a Cox .049 kit for 40 bucks or so


With 2.4 GHz 4-channel all-electric quadracopters going for under 35 bucks, it's kind of hard to sell the idea of swinging a finicky gas-powered plane round and round on the end of a few dozen feet of fishing line...

Incidentally, $40 in 1975 would be around $175 today.


Mid 90s.  
Link Posted: 4/24/2015 2:35:34 AM EDT
[#13]
Link Posted: 4/24/2015 2:36:51 AM EDT
[#14]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
probably TOO DANGEROUS for today's nanny society
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True.  I remember watching the guys with the combat control line planes.  They were FAST.
Link Posted: 4/24/2015 2:37:15 AM EDT
[#15]
They still make control line planes, check out tower hobbies. They have a control line combat division that people still compete in and it's pretty big at the nationals.
Link Posted: 4/24/2015 2:42:41 AM EDT
[#16]





Good times in the 70s & 80s.


Link Posted: 4/24/2015 2:43:46 AM EDT
[#17]
I had a P-51 Mustang like this one.









It was handed down from my dad, it had a lot of repairs, had to retire it because it had one too many crashes.
Link Posted: 4/24/2015 2:53:02 AM EDT
[#18]
If you're dead set on going really fast in circles, you could look into dynamic soaring. I think the world record stands at 468 MPH still. That's with a glider-no form of propulsion beyond wind and gravity. And you can get into regular RC for a pretty reasonable cost. If you're looking to learn or teach someone, I always recommend an IFO MK3. It's pretty much a powered kite-ripstop nylon and carbon fiber rods held together with kevlar thread and CA. You can find plans and kits online. It was the one plane I had that I would hand anyone the controller to and let them try to fly (provided it was a safe space-not a crowded park).

And EPP (expanded polypropylene) kits are really durable. They look like cheap foam, but they're tough to break and easy to fix.



My bad-new record is 505 mph with a glider.
Link Posted: 4/24/2015 3:55:20 AM EDT
[#19]
Last weekend, i saw a Sig Kadet that had been stored 12 yrs fire up within
5 mins of trying. YMMV
Link Posted: 4/24/2015 4:33:28 AM EDT
[#20]
Well,  I'm not sure about the flying part,  but I crashed them.
Link Posted: 4/24/2015 4:36:28 AM EDT
[#21]
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Quoted:


Mid 90s.  
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Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
Used to be able to get a Cox .049 kit for 40 bucks or so


With 2.4 GHz 4-channel all-electric quadracopters going for under 35 bucks, it's kind of hard to sell the idea of swinging a finicky gas-powered plane round and round on the end of a few dozen feet of fishing line...

Incidentally, $40 in 1975 would be around $175 today.


Mid 90s.  


They were in the teens in the early '70s when I was buying them.
Link Posted: 4/24/2015 4:43:43 AM EDT
[#22]
I've had one of these kits tucked away, maybe this is the way to go.  



Link Posted: 4/24/2015 4:51:42 AM EDT
[#23]

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


I've had one of these kits tucked away, maybe this is the way to go.  



http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v415/Subcanis/20150424_004329.jpg



View Quote
I bought an electric sailplane in 2011 and flew it like... 3 times. I sold it to a friend and he's flown it twice, total



Booooooriiiiiiiiiiiiing. I have more fun with DLGs, honestly. But full-contact combat is even better



 
Link Posted: 4/24/2015 4:59:32 AM EDT
[#24]
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Quoted:
Well,  I'm not sure about the flying part,  but I crashed them.
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LoL
That's about my experience as well.
Link Posted: 4/24/2015 5:02:01 AM EDT
[#25]
Link Posted: 4/24/2015 5:47:06 AM EDT
[#26]
I did.  Started with pre-built P-51 from Cox and then built my own.
Link Posted: 4/24/2015 5:53:04 AM EDT
[#27]
I had the following cox models.
PT19 Trainer
P51 Miss America.
Stuka.

crashed em all.

built another control line model from a kit.
crashed the hell out of that one too.
I kept getting dizzy,.
1970s were a hoot.
Link Posted: 4/24/2015 6:06:14 AM EDT
[#28]
I think that we started with the Cox P19 Trainer.  It was held together by rubber bands.  Moved on to other 049 powered planes, many Carl Goldberg planes.  Wizard was a favorite because it was a solid wing.  We modded them and got them pretty fast.

In the summer we would gather in the neighborhood turnaround and fly together.  We had electric starters way before they became commercially available.

We didn't really realize it at the time, but my friends and I learned many lessons about building, materials and construction.   Stalls, takeoff and landing, weight and balance, engines, and mechanics as well.  Those lessons have served me well.

Link Posted: 4/24/2015 6:12:46 AM EDT
[#29]
I had a Fokker DVII and a Stuka. The Stuka died in a spectacular crash.
Link Posted: 4/24/2015 6:19:35 AM EDT
[#30]
I tried C/L back in the day, but never could get the hang of it. R/C is a whole lot easier.  First airplane was an Electra as pictured above.
Link Posted: 4/24/2015 6:19:37 AM EDT
[#31]
Here is probably the largest modern source for control line gear today:

Brodaks

If you are looking for a little excitement you might give Combat a try. 150mph +, and you gotta wear a helmet

Here is a video of some FAI F2D, the international competition class.

Link Posted: 4/24/2015 6:23:18 AM EDT
[#32]
Yes, I'm still dizzy.
Link Posted: 4/24/2015 6:33:54 AM EDT
[#33]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
I had a P-51 Mustang like this one.

http://www.ipass.net/wb4iuy/p-51.jpg



It was handed down from my dad, it had a lot of repairs, had to retire it because it had one too many crashes.
View Quote


i remember having one like that.

except mine was all red.

don't remember it being around long.
Link Posted: 4/24/2015 7:04:40 AM EDT
[#34]
Fly them?  No.



Looping them into the ground till the engine was shot?   Yes.









Link Posted: 4/24/2015 7:28:24 AM EDT
[#35]
I flew control line planes when I was a kid.
Had the Cox planes and also built balsa wood kits
like the Flightstreak, Nobler, Corsair.
Did more fixing than flying..
Link Posted: 4/24/2015 7:40:48 AM EDT
[#36]
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Quoted:
when I was a wee lad.  had a Cox P40
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This
Link Posted: 4/24/2015 7:43:13 AM EDT
[#37]
Used to have a Stuka that dive bombed many a parking lot.
Link Posted: 4/24/2015 7:46:41 AM EDT
[#38]

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Quoted:


Used to have a Stuka that dive bombed many a parking lot.
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I had the Stuka too

 
Link Posted: 4/24/2015 7:52:11 AM EDT
[#39]
I had one as a kid. It was more of a twin tailed flying wing. Would try to cut the crepe paper streamer off of the back of my dad's plane. Really only ended up crashing/rebuilding it a few times until it was toast


My brother had an old .049 formula 1 type car that you would tether to a stake and race with. I remember cranking the rear wheel around what seemed like forever to star that thing. When it went, that thing was fast!
Link Posted: 4/24/2015 8:11:12 AM EDT
[#40]
Sure did.  Built a few and bought a few.  It did get tiring going in circles until the fuel ran out.    
Link Posted: 4/24/2015 8:16:19 AM EDT
[#41]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


Yup, my cousin had one but they got boring quickly going around in circles.
View Quote View All Quotes
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
I did when I was very young.  I just started looking into kits for my kids and I.  Did they just completely die out?  Used to be able to get a Cox .049 kit for 40 bucks or so, and there were about a dozen different models to choose from.  



Yup, my cousin had one but they got boring quickly going around in circles.


This,  I had IIRC a Testors or was it a cox spitfire fighter.  


Mine was one of those nearly indestructo plastic jobs which was good because they thing really wouldn't fly all that level, it'd dive all the time, so you'd be alternating the dive natural with forcing it up.  Looked like a circular touch and go landing exercise.  

I think I flew mine 3 times and put it back in the box.  Never even used all the fuel.

My next plane was some giant electric powered foam plane on a glider like body with about a 45-50" wingspan.  It also sucked as the batteries that came with it were waaay too heavy for the thing to ever fly.  You'd have to rev her up and toss her to fly and in 20 yards she'd nose dive hard.  After a few repairs to the foam nose and cockpit area I gave up as she wouldn't be repairable after that.  

Never had a really good plane.
Link Posted: 4/24/2015 8:28:44 AM EDT
[#42]
I used to with my dad a few years ago. We built a few planes from plans, they were 3-4" wingspan. They just hang on the ceiling in a side room at his place now. Think we ran some OS RC type engines. Quite a bit of pull from bigger engines.
Link Posted: 4/24/2015 8:31:33 AM EDT
[#43]
Link Posted: 4/24/2015 8:34:58 AM EDT
[#44]
Quoted:
I did when I was very young.  I just started looking into kits for my kids and I.  Did they just completely die out?  Used to be able to get a Cox .049 kit for 40 bucks or so, and there were about a dozen different models to choose from.  

View Quote


there's a group that does control line combat once or twice a month at the flying field i fly at down here.  sounds like two really angry bees, then "smack!" and silence.

edit:  these are the guys

Quoted:
Here is probably the largest modern source for control line gear today:

Brodaks

If you are looking for a little excitement you might give Combat a try. 150mph +, and you gotta wear a helmet

Here is a video of some FAI F2D, the international competition class.

http://youtu.be/e10bGw-ilpE
View Quote

Link Posted: 4/24/2015 8:38:24 AM EDT
[#45]
As a kid I had a cox piper commanche.  I used it a couple times, but the line thing wasn't very much fun.
Link Posted: 4/24/2015 8:40:26 AM EDT
[#46]
My brother had the Stuka also. It made one and only one dive bombing run.

I built a balsa control line plane years later and took my chances. It had a Fox .19 engine.  Apparently I built it with the rudder in the wrong direction and it started chasing me. Threw the handle down and ran like a girl.     Got into R/C after that.
Link Posted: 4/24/2015 8:40:30 AM EDT
[#47]
How do you keep from getting dizzy?
Link Posted: 4/24/2015 8:41:20 AM EDT
[#48]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
I did when I was a kid. I'm surprised they don't make them anymore.
I fly RC now.
View Quote



Actually there still are a few small companies making control line stuff.
http://brodak.com/

I don't see why now that RC is so inexpensive and so much more capable.

I do like FF rubber powered models, however.  Mostly I admire the craftsmanship some of the guys who build scale models have.  I would like to go see some of the Flying Aces meets but none are in western PA.  There is a big one in geneseo NY area.
Link Posted: 4/24/2015 8:44:06 AM EDT
[#49]
When I was a kid.
I had forgotten about those things.
Link Posted: 4/24/2015 8:53:28 AM EDT
[#50]
I think those plastic airplanes and Cox 049s did more to hurt model airplanes than help it.  



If anyone still has interest, modern r/c aircraft are pretty amazing.  Cost to get into it is now in the dirt cheap range.  Many good airplanes are now completely ready to fly.  Modern radios are much more reliable and even feature onboard telemetry.



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