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11/22/2017 10:05:29 PM
Posted: 9/6/2004 7:51:35 AM EST
I'm not talking about a calculator...

I mean for your home or something large scale like that. I know in Florida solar [water] heating is fairly common. What about for electricity... using those large solar cell/panels?

-Are the [solar] panels expensive?
- Do they quickly pay for themselves?
- How many do you need to get a reasonable output?
- What happens when the sun goes down... are they hooked up to capacitors or something so you can run off stored energy/power that was "collected" by the panels?
- What are the drawbacks?
- Maintenance? Do they lose a lot of the efficiency if they get really dusty or if it is overcast?

This has always fascinated me.

How about wind or hydroelectric?
Link Posted: 9/6/2004 7:52:44 AM EST
This is related to your other topic is it?

www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=1&f=5&t=271338

SGtar15
Link Posted: 9/6/2004 7:56:25 AM EST
I have a bunch of illegals running in man-sized ratwheels.

It doesn't generate electricity but its fun to watch.

Man oh man can they run!


- BG
Link Posted: 9/6/2004 7:56:52 AM EST
I keep a couple dozen armadillos hopped up on minithins running treadmills in the garage.
Link Posted: 9/6/2004 7:57:38 AM EST

Originally Posted By BUCC_Guy:
I have a bunch of illegals running in man-sized ratwheels.

It doesn't generate electricity but its fun to watch.

Man oh man can they run!


- BG






Do you dangle a green card from a stick in front of them too?


SGatr15
Link Posted: 9/6/2004 9:17:55 AM EST
We use solar at our mountain place. It provides most of the power. We hook it up to a bank of batteries. On a string of cloudy days, we do have a generator backup.

The whole system cost around 20K five years ago but it is probably a lot cheaper now.
Expensive, but cheaper than having the utility lay lines 4 miles to our place.
Link Posted: 9/6/2004 9:19:30 AM EST

Originally Posted By SS109:
We use solar at our mountain place. It provides most of the power. We hook it up to a bank of batteries. On a string of cloudy days, we do have a generator backup.

The whole system cost around 20K five years ago but it is probably a lot cheaper now.
Expensive, but cheaper than having the utility lay lines 4 miles to our place.



Not much cheaper

Luck
Alac
Link Posted: 9/6/2004 9:30:28 AM EST
Link Posted: 9/6/2004 9:41:22 AM EST
1.21 Jiggawatts, I like it
Link Posted: 9/6/2004 12:45:23 PM EST
check out www.homepower.com
Link Posted: 9/6/2004 1:17:09 PM EST

Originally Posted By BUCC_Guy:
I have a bunch of illegals running in man-sized ratwheels.
It doesn't generate electricity but its fun to watch.
Man oh man can they run!
- BG



I suppose responses like this are evidence of karma... all the times I give smart ass answers on other people's threads who are asking a serious question hoping for serious response.

Having said that... did I miss the mail-order ad in the back of Pop-Sci for the illegals and wheel contraption. Sounds like a good investment. I'd probably give up TV to watch that...

Link Posted: 9/6/2004 4:36:41 PM EST
tag
Link Posted: 9/6/2004 4:48:44 PM EST
In the mountain valley where we are, solar systems like us are getting more popular. The electric utility charges very high minimums every month plus our low population density means slow repair times when power goes out.
Link Posted: 9/7/2004 3:59:43 AM EST

Originally Posted By SS109:
In the mountain valley where we are, solar systems like us are getting more popular. The electric utility charges very high minimums every month plus our low population density means slow repair times when power goes out.



Details? What kind of system do you have? What kind of output does it get?
Link Posted: 9/7/2004 8:48:57 PM EST

Originally Posted By Alacrity:

Originally Posted By SS109:
We use solar at our mountain place. It provides most of the power. We hook it up to a bank of batteries. On a string of cloudy days, we do have a generator backup.

The whole system cost around 20K five years ago but it is probably a lot cheaper now.
Expensive, but cheaper than having the utility lay lines 4 miles to our place.



Not much cheaper

Luck
Alac



Are you kidding? For most locations it's ALOT cheaper! The utility loves to bend people over to put up a couple poles and pay a couple guys their years wage for one days work.

S.O.

Link Posted: 9/7/2004 8:59:16 PM EST
Just burning wood and stuff during winter for heat/sometimes cooking.

I used to burn mummies but they are getting hard to find.
Link Posted: 9/8/2004 1:46:52 AM EST

Originally Posted By Taxman:
I used to burn mummies but they are getting hard to find.



What kind of mummies? Crack-whore, welfare mummies?
Switch to mommies... they're in abundance.
Link Posted: 9/8/2004 2:11:14 AM EST
I have a small solar electric (PV - PhotoVoltic) system. Just two panels (about 4 amps) and one set of batteries. A small 800 Watt inverter (12v - 120) I'm looking to expand it. It provides power to about one room of my amateur radio equipment etc. There's a ton of information on line. Search or Solar Electric or PV systems.

Cool Stuff.

KAC
Link Posted: 9/8/2004 3:03:06 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/8/2004 3:10:11 AM EST by jchewie]

Originally Posted By pathfinder74:
I'm not talking about a calculator...

I mean for your home or something large scale like that. I know in Florida solar [water] heating is fairly common. What about for electricity... using those large solar cell/panels?

-Are the [solar] panels expensive?
- Do they quickly pay for themselves?
Not really if you are in Michigan
- How many do you need to get a reasonable output?
- What happens when the sun goes down... are they hooked up to capacitors or something so you can run off stored energy/power that was "collected" by the panels?
- What are the drawbacks?
- Maintenance? Do they lose a lot of the efficiency if they get really dusty or if it is overcast?

This has always fascinated me.

How about wind or hydroelectric?



I recently purchased a house with a large (20'x16') heat collecting solar array. The original owner used it for heating in the winter, but did not plumb it for preheating the hot water. That is something I plan on doing when I replace the hot water heater.

Michigan (where I am anyway) has too many cloudy days and there just isn't enough sun for practical electricity generation in the fall/winter/spring.

My neighbor is really into wind power, he is putting up a 100 foot pole with a 20' diameter windmill generator on top.

Link Posted: 9/8/2004 4:04:44 AM EST
Is the power output for wind pretty good... or at least woth the investment in short/long term thinking?
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