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Posted: 8/31/2004 6:42:05 AM EST
Something like this



?

Seems like they'd be easier on the ass than a regular bike.
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 7:14:41 AM EST
....gay
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 7:15:31 AM EST
Red_Beard,

I've been riding and racing bicycles my whole life. I've worked in shops most of my life too and sold thousands of bikes but the one thing I never understood were the recumbent bikes. I just don't get them. However, if it gets you interested in cycling and gets you out exercising and enjoying a good ride them I'm all for it! Go for it!

However, you should know that a properly fitted bike will be very comfortable and should not be any harder on the ass than a recumbent. Find a good bike shop(s) in your area and try several brands, styles and sizes. If you can find a good shop that knows how to properly fit a bike you should not have any problems.

You are more than welcome to IM or email me directly with any questions.

Marc
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 7:21:44 AM EST


Looks like something Mr. Bean would ride

Crash and burn waiting to happen, plus they don't go up hills too well. OTOH they do seem to get out and go on the flats.
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 7:24:41 AM EST
I see a guy riding one just about everyday on my way into work. It looks kinda retarded to me.
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 7:25:51 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/31/2004 7:26:29 AM EST by Admiral_Crunch]
I always just stand up and put my weight down on the pedals to get up steel hills. I don't see any other way to do it, unless this bike gears WAY down to pull.
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 7:27:39 AM EST
I agree they look goofy. The one I posted looks super gay, but it was the first pic I could find.




Originally Posted By Waldo:

Looks like something Mr. Bean would ride

Crash and burn waiting to happen, plus they don't go up hills too well. OTOH they do seem to get out and go on the flats.



From what I've read on the net, most speed records are held by recumbent bikes, with all the areodynamic crap added on.

The other advantaged that seems to be touted is that you can go for longer distances on them without getting a sore ass/back/arms etc.

They must take more work to use though, because you don't have the advantage of your body weight pressing down on the pedals to help you along.


I've been thinking of ditching my mountain bike, which is getting kind of crapped out, and picking up somethign new. If I can get my fat ass into halfways decent shape I'll start biking to work instead of driving. These came up in my web search as somethign to consider.
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 7:28:05 AM EST
Kinda Gay, but they're really popular with the amish around here!
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 7:30:13 AM EST
Very Very Very popular in Seattle if that tells you anything.
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 7:32:51 AM EST

Originally Posted By M4arc:
Red_Beard,

I've been riding and racing bicycles my whole life. I've worked in shops most of my life too and sold thousands of bikes but the one thing I never understood were the recumbent bikes. I just don't get them. However, if it gets you interested in cycling and gets you out exercising and enjoying a good ride them I'm all for it! Go for it!

However, you should know that a properly fitted bike will be very comfortable and should not be any harder on the ass than a recumbent. Find a good bike shop(s) in your area and try several brands, styles and sizes. If you can find a good shop that knows how to properly fit a bike you should not have any problems.

You are more than welcome to IM or email me directly with any questions.

Marc




Like Marc, I have worked in the bicycle industry for quite some time too. I never did understand recumbents until I tried one. They are a very fun bike and can be quite comfortable. In addition, many of them are as responsive, if not more so than a typical road bike.

Where they really shine is for those who may not be extremely flexible or have other physical limitations that prevent them from riding a typical bike.

Plus, if you are a true bicycle fanatic, you've got to have at least 1 of each kind of bike out there!!
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 7:32:51 AM EST
My dad's cousin is a big name in the recumbent industry. He hass been selling Scarab Recumbent Trikes lately. They are much safer. He told me that if you drive a 2-wheel recumbent, you will crash -- and probably fairly often. It seems most of his friends and customers are switching over to the trikes.

I've driven both the yellow and orange ones pictured below and all I can say is HOLY COW. They are unbelievably comfortable and you can convert a very small amount of energy into unbelievable speed. They're so comfortable, I could easily take a nap on one. And since it puts you in an ideal posture, you have excellent mechanical advantage -- that's why they're so efficient.





Link Posted: 8/31/2004 7:36:42 AM EST

I have ridden a race variant of recumbant bike (HPV) when in college. The engineers tapped the cycling team for power during the competitions.

Very, very fast, but (at least the one I rode) had some handling issues.

From a practicality standpoint. Think survivability. One of a cyclists only advantages on the street and in traffic is the ability to see far ahead. On a recumbant, being so low, you are giving up that advantage.

Try a mountain bike with a quality (not huge and cushy) saddle. You will find it more suitable in the long run.

-Z
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 7:37:16 AM EST
I have a recumbent bike. No, they're not gay. I rode a conventional bike for decades, and finally got sick and tired of perpetually sore but.

Recumbents are faster than conventional bikes on the flats. The reason you never see them in competition is that the International Bicycle Federation banned them around the 1910's. They are unbelievably comforable to ride. You sit in natural position with your head up and look at the countryside, instead of hunched over looking down at the road.

Anyways, I've got one and you can send me an email if you'd like more info.
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 9:01:28 AM EST
My big problem with them is that they are too low to be seen easily by cars.

GunLvr
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 9:13:20 AM EST
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 3:08:13 PM EST

Originally Posted By BlammO:
My dad's cousin is a big name in the recumbent industry. He hass been selling Scarab Recumbent Trikes lately. They are much safer. He told me that if you drive a 2-wheel recumbent, you will crash -- and probably fairly often. It seems most of his friends and customers are switching over to the trikes.

I've driven both the yellow and orange ones pictured below and all I can say is HOLY COW. They are unbelievably comfortable and you can convert a very small amount of energy into unbelievable speed. They're so comfortable, I could easily take a nap on one. And since it puts you in an ideal posture, you have excellent mechanical advantage -- that's why they're so efficient.

pages.prodigy.net/bment/hjh5.JPG

pages.prodigy.net/bment/scarab~1.gif

pages.prodigy.net/bment/yellowftqtr.jpg



Those look pretty cool, but ouch...........$2550.00.
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 3:18:30 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 3:29:11 PM EST
When I was in college I knew an older gentleman who rode one of those things _everywhere_. He had a yellow aerodynamic bubble that would make him more visible and keep him out of the cold, but this guy was a nut about his bike. Like was said before though, he used to get hit a few times a year by cars, and I suspiciously don't see much of him anymore
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 3:30:57 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 3:41:16 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/31/2004 3:41:32 PM EST by Red_Beard]

Originally Posted By CAMPYBOB:
they climb like a fucking rock.

properly faired, they go fast in a straight line.

they throw little draft, so it's best just to put the hammer down and drop the silly things on the first stiff climb you come to and be done with it.

it's far more pleasant to draft a smooth tandem.

our team training rides attracted a couple three recumbants. they loved to hammer down the straight, level stretches and we never saw them again after the first hills.

most of them handle like shit. maybe good enough for touring, but too weird for a tight crit or circuit race. a few of them aren't too bad for descending...the easy racer seemed to be fairly stabile when i tried coming off a few twistyturners downhill. still, nothing i would want to come off the alleghenys at 65mph on.




how would you say they compare to a "regular" bike for exercize and slow paced weekend trips (i.e. no racing)?

Link Posted: 8/31/2004 3:42:27 PM EST
My brother has a BikeE, not recumbent in the way those are. He was a little overweight, and wanted to get some exercise, the layout on most bikes hurt his neck, plus he is a strange dude, so it was perfect for him. he used it mostly at parks with a bike path, not out in traffic. It helped him lose the weight he wanted. I rode it a few times, way different than a regular bicycle, but it was alot of fun. He opted for a the mid priced model, around 6-700 bucks.
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 3:44:14 PM EST
I live about 2 blocks from a 10 mile bike/walking/running path and I regularly see recumbents. They are usually hauling ass!!
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 3:48:04 PM EST

Heck, I just bought the first bike I've owned since I was a kid, 15-20 years ago.

No way I'm ready to branch out to something like those gay recumbant bikes.



Link Posted: 8/31/2004 3:55:45 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 3:56:18 PM EST

Originally Posted By Red_Beard:

Originally Posted By BlammO:
My dad's cousin is a big name in the recumbent industry. He hass been selling Scarab Recumbent Trikes lately. They are much safer. He told me that if you drive a 2-wheel recumbent, you will crash -- and probably fairly often. It seems most of his friends and customers are switching over to the trikes.

I've driven both the yellow and orange ones pictured below and all I can say is HOLY COW. They are unbelievably comfortable and you can convert a very small amount of energy into unbelievable speed. They're so comfortable, I could easily take a nap on one. And since it puts you in an ideal posture, you have excellent mechanical advantage -- that's why they're so efficient.

pages.prodigy.net/bment/hjh5.JPG

pages.prodigy.net/bment/scarab~1.gif

pages.prodigy.net/bment/yellowftqtr.jpg



Those look pretty cool, but ouch...........$2550.00.



I know -- that's the only thing that keeps me from owning one at the moment. But when you see them in person and ride one, the price becomes much more understandable. He has the frames fabricated by an airframe shop up north, then he hand builds from there. Quality is top-notch.

As far as climbing like a rock, I didn't personally tackle any hills, but the Scarabs, as Barry is currently building them, have 54 speeds! I was able to drive one through grass and over a curb with no problem at all. It's almost like having a continuously variable transmission in the palm of your hand. Plus, the trikes are perfectly stable.
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 4:01:24 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 4:05:18 PM EST

Originally Posted By CAMPYBOB:in the not so distant future of $10/gallon gasoline, i think we will be seeing a lot more from recumbent designs.



Ha! $2 a gallon gas has me looking around for something better than my crapped out mountain bike to ride to work. (That and the realization that riding 5 miles to work in the morning and 5 miles back home in the evening would probably do wonders for my health).

Link Posted: 8/31/2004 4:08:59 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 4:13:49 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 4:26:47 PM EST
Having ridden two types of recumbents I can comment on the handling fo the twain.

The trike which my parents own is incredibly stable . . . cornering is very nice with this bike, even in gravel. It is a heavy son-of-a-gun, though. Not easily adjusted for riders with different leg lengths (will depend on style).

The two wheeler is very fast and looks real cool. Don't try to climb hills as you switch into a gear which is ridiculously low and the bike loses all stability while you and up going maybe 1/2 mph. Also, stability in general is poor, steering is difficult at best because of a funky design for the front neck (imagine the original hogs with the loooong handlebars and tiny front wheels).

Different designs could easily improve upon the experiences I have had. They are a lot of fun to ride and some of the uncomfortable nature of things is that they are not what I am used to riding.

Not to mention the expense.

Link Posted: 8/31/2004 4:36:15 PM EST

Originally Posted By CAMPYBOB:
they climb like a fucking rock.

properly faired, they go fast in a straight line.

they throw little draft, so it's best just to put the hammer down and drop the silly things on the first stiff climb you come to and be done with it.

it's far more pleasant to draft a smooth tandem.

our team training rides attracted a couple three recumbants. they loved to hammer down the straight, level stretches and we never saw them again after the first hills.

most of them handle like shit. maybe good enough for touring, but too weird for a tight crit or circuit race. a few of them aren't too bad for descending...the easy racer seemed to be fairly stabile when i tried coming off a few twistyturners downhill. still, nothing i would want to come off the alleghenys at 65mph on.



What he said:
I am an injured runner turned Bicyclist. My problems are my hamstrings, which take a beating on a recumbant. They are fast on the flats and downhills, some guys put a plastic fairing( 400.00)
in front. On Ragbrai ther were some of those trikes, they would scoot but, if the road wasn't closed odds are some day you'd end up mush.
On another point Colorado Cyclist is having their yearly LITESPEED sale, The best value is a Classic for 2500.00
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 4:52:27 PM EST
If you're gonna be mixing it up with traffic on a regular basis I'd recommemd sticking with a conventional machine, if you're mainly gonna be riding side streets and multi-use trails I'd say go for it and have a ball. I commute by bicycle every day year 'round, part of the route being very busy main streets, and I wouldn't even dream of doing it on a recumbent. You're just too low to be visible (or see squat yourself for that matter) and that little flag just ain't gonna cut it. Visibility both ways is the rule when you're mixing it up with the heavy iron.
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 9:49:34 PM EST
Them recumbment bikes are for people who do not know to use real bikes, whether it's road bikes or mountain bikes.
Link Posted: 9/1/2004 1:27:14 AM EST
Just 99.9% of the people that ride them are...


Originally Posted By CAMPYBOB:
recumbents are NOT gay.

Link Posted: 9/1/2004 8:35:13 AM EST

Originally Posted By CAMPYBOB:
recumbents are NOT gay.



If I had .50 for everytime someone said that int his thread, I could buy a new AR mag.

I dont know who rides them in Ohio, but the butt sniffers are on em out here. They are down there.

Trust me, out left coast, they need to rename them the "Richard Simmons inspirational toys".

Link Posted: 9/1/2004 8:41:20 AM EST
One question. Where's the beer cup holder????
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