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Posted: 3/12/2013 6:58:38 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/13/2013 7:25:04 PM EDT by RedRyder21]
Does anyone here ever use a hammer and nail set for interior trim?

I have a couple small interior trim jobs coming up. I could just buy a decent nail gun and I have a friend willing to loan one to me. The few trim pieces are mainly in a pretty small bathroom. I have been using a 16 oz hammer for interior trim and it seems a bit like over kill. I'm dealing with some pretty basic cheap interior trim. Not an expensive stain grade cherry chair rail.

If you are using hammer and nail set for interior trim what kind of hammer are you using? I have been looking at the dalluge brand and other wood handled hammers.

Am I just nuts for wanting to do it the old fashioned way?
Link Posted: 3/12/2013 7:19:34 PM EDT
Two words

Krazy Glue
Link Posted: 3/12/2013 7:20:30 PM EDT
I did use a hammer until a buddy insisted I borrow his trim nailer. There is no comparison. Pneumatic or nothing for me from now out. Installing door trim with one hand in 3 seconds is worth the price of admission.
Link Posted: 3/12/2013 7:25:25 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/12/2013 7:28:19 PM EDT by Stryfe]
I use a 16 or 20 ounce hammer depending on what I grab. I have a lot of tools, but for pounding nails, the only thing I have that's smaller is a little tack hammer I got cheap. It's too small for trim, and I struggle a little with hammers lighter than 16, they just feel wrong.
I did have an apt I had to get ready to rent. We'd torn out the ratty old carpet to show off the hardwood floors. The entire flat needed to be trimmed out around the floor. I borrowed a finish nailer, what a godsend.
But, when I redid my bathroom last fall, I went back to my hammer, just because it was a small job and it would've been more work to go get a nailer.

They both have their place.
Link Posted: 3/12/2013 7:29:54 PM EDT
Sorry Paslode all the way now.

If I had to use a hammer for trim, probably my Estwing 12 oz. If you dull the points of your finish nails they are less prone to splitting the trim. Glue miters and use paintable caulking. Prepare to be infinitely frustrated.
Link Posted: 3/12/2013 7:32:25 PM EDT
Use a nail gun. Keep a nailset and hammer handy for the ones that don't quite drive right.
Link Posted: 3/12/2013 8:59:16 PM EDT
Nail gun, they have been making my job easier for almost 21 years
Link Posted: 3/13/2013 7:23:58 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/13/2013 7:26:06 PM EDT by RedRyder21]
It almost seems like a 9mm vs 45 debate, but for all around use with doors and trim, 18 gauge or 16 gauge for a nail gun?

What size compressor for the home DIY'er?
Link Posted: 3/13/2013 7:32:18 PM EDT
No matter how good you are, you're going to miss or hit one a little hard every now and then. If you like those dings in the trim, get a hammer.
Link Posted: 3/13/2013 7:41:30 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/13/2013 7:47:14 PM EDT by MP0117]
Hammer? Whats that?

I use a 15 gauge angle nailer for jams and a 16 for regular trim like casings, base board or crown.

18 gauge for delicate stuff like corners or to keep miters tight.

I only use hammers to break shit.

And for setting nails I use a Spring Tools nail set. Spring Tools

It beats having to carry a hammer around with me.

ETA - I put off buying a 15 gauge angle nailer for about 10 years after a pro carpenter told me to purchase one... I should have done it sooner.

Link Posted: 3/13/2013 7:44:15 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/13/2013 7:59:18 PM EDT by MP0117]
Originally Posted By RedRyder21:
It almost seems like a 9mm vs 45 debate, but for all around use with doors and trim, 18 gauge or 16 gauge for a nail gun?

What size compressor for the home DIY'er?


To do everything you really need both. But for the trim 16 gauge will be better. 18 gauge is for more delicate stuff and doesn't have the holding power of 16 gauge nails.

I recently picked up a Hitachi dual tank from Lowes for $180ish. It's fantastic. It will hold air for a week without leaking if I forget to bleed it.

The Husky stuff from Home Depot is GARBAGE. I've returned the last three. They all had leaking fittings from the box.

Hitachi comressor.
Link Posted: 3/14/2013 8:57:56 AM EDT
16 gauge porter cable nail gun, just did my whole house not too long ago with new trim and I would have hated trying to do it with a hammer.

Krazy glue? Don't glue it just in case you have to take it back off for some reason. You might tear the paper. THe previous owner painted to the top of the previous trim and you had to cut the paint or it would have torn the paper. It actually did in some spots and that isn't fun to fix sometimes.
Link Posted: 3/14/2013 10:26:10 AM EDT

Originally Posted By SabreCat:
Use a nail gun. Keep a nailset and hammer handy for the ones that don't quite drive right.


Dont need that, take the nails out of the gun, place over extented nail, pull trigger=set perfectly.


No need for the nailset
Link Posted: 3/14/2013 10:34:56 AM EDT
I'm pretty good with the hammer and the nail gun. Now I need to get better at repairing/covering up my "whoops" marks.
Link Posted: 3/14/2013 10:57:48 AM EDT
Originally Posted By TaylorWSO:

Originally Posted By SabreCat:
Use a nail gun. Keep a nailset and hammer handy for the ones that don't quite drive right.


Dont need that, take the nails out of the gun, place over extented nail, pull trigger=set perfectly.


No need for the nailset


This ^^^, use the driver blade of the nail gun as you're nail set
Link Posted: 3/14/2013 7:05:45 PM EDT
Originally Posted By TaylorWSO:

Originally Posted By SabreCat:
Use a nail gun. Keep a nailset and hammer handy for the ones that don't quite drive right.


Dont need that, take the nails out of the gun, place over extented nail, pull trigger=set perfectly.


No need for the nailset


I love that trick.

Link Posted: 3/14/2013 7:21:54 PM EDT
Thanks for all the suggestions! 16 gauge nail gun here I come!!!

Seems like everytime I get a little tired of burning up all my money shooting I try and do home DIY stuff and mess with things in my house I should probably leave to a professional!

Link Posted: 3/17/2013 5:09:04 PM EDT
Originally Posted By moparman71:
I did use a hammer until a buddy insisted I borrow his trim nailer. There is no comparison. Pneumatic or nothing for me from now out. Installing door trim with one hand in 3 seconds is worth the price of admission.


A good friend of mine loaned me his DeWalt 18V trim nailer.

AWESOME!

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 3/20/2013 12:40:18 PM EDT
Bostitch brad nailer is what I use for interior trim and door case finishing. I have a finish nailer too, but have only used it for one project.
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