Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
9/19/2017 7:27:10 PM
Posted: 5/19/2003 4:56:18 PM EDT
Link Posted: 5/19/2003 5:00:51 PM EDT
I have it, but I don't do anything about it. My doctor told me as long as I don't wake up ired I should be ok. He also said losing weight can make it go away some times. One of my friends has it and uses a machine that blows air to help keep his air passages open. My uncle also used a machine like that for a few years but eventually gave it up.
Link Posted: 5/19/2003 5:08:31 PM EDT
Me and Rat Fink have camped with the Beer Slayer enough to be convinced HE has it, and he oughta DO something!!! DAMN does he ever wake us up!!![BD]
Link Posted: 5/19/2003 5:23:38 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/19/2003 5:23:56 PM EDT by cduarte]
I have it and it's definitely something to be concerned about. Do something about it now! Research is now showing links between apnea and Alzheimers. Apnea occurs when the air passage in the back of your throat collapses while sleeping, cutting off your O2 supply. Go check out the Stanford U Med school website and search on apnea, they are the leaders in research on it. Your doc will make you go get a sleep study, where they wire you up with a few hundred sensors and videotape you sleeping. One of the sensors is a blood oxygen meter and if you have apnea, you will see your blood/O2 saturation plummeting as you go in and out of sleep. There are 3 ways to control/eliminate apnea: 1. lose weight - one of the prime causes of apnea is being overweight. I'm working on this and being pretty successful. 2. surgery - I had a deviated septum corrected when I was 24, and am not a good candidate for further surgery. BTW, this procedure was really far from fun. 3. CPAP machine - this machine provides Constant Positive Air Pressure, hence the acronym and consists of a compressor, a mask that you wear over your nose with an inline humidifier to prevent dryness. This takes some getting used to but you will not believe the difference in the quantity and quality of your sleep. No more exhaustion at the slightest physical activity, no more falling asleep at the wheel on the way home from work. It's made a big improvement in my life Once I lose enough weight, I should be able to go with out the CPAP machine but I can deal with it for now. If you want more info, IM me. hth, Chris
Link Posted: 5/19/2003 5:53:56 PM EDT
No but my wife does, so I do by proxy. Does that count?
Link Posted: 5/19/2003 5:56:26 PM EDT
Originally Posted By cduarte: 3. CPAP machine - this machine provides Constant Positive Air Pressure, hence the acronym and consists of a compressor, a mask that you wear over your nose with an inline humidifier to prevent dryness. This takes some getting used to but you will not believe the difference in the quantity and quality of your sleep. No more exhaustion at the slightest physical activity, no more falling asleep at the wheel on the way home from work. It's made a big improvement in my life
View Quote
What he said.
Link Posted: 5/19/2003 5:56:55 PM EDT
My son did... He would snore to take the roof off. He was always tired in the morning for school...because he slept so poorly... The doctor suggested surgery.... We had his adnoids and tonsils taken out.... BINGO! He is like a new boy!! Sleeps soundly.... No regrets what so ever!!
Link Posted: 5/19/2003 6:00:42 PM EDT
Hey Tc6969, I don't know how far you are from Lake Alfred, but if your doctor put's you on a CPAP, my wife works for a local respritory comapany here and she does the fitting for the CPAP mask. Can't say for sure, but she may be able to hook you with somwthing comfortable. But her Boss is a major BITCH!, If nothing else she could zero you in on the best mask. IM me if you want the phone number there. 556mm
Link Posted: 5/19/2003 6:04:36 PM EDT
My girlfriend is a respiratory therapist and does sleep studies. Sleep apnea is indicative of other health problems. I would HIGHLY recommend seeing a doctor about it. Untreated, sleep apnea can cause high blood pressure and other cardiovascular disease, memory problems, weight gain, impotency, and headaches. Moreover, untreated sleep apnea may be responsible for job impairment and motor vehicle crashes. Do yourself and your family a favor, get checked out in a sleep lab.
Link Posted: 5/19/2003 6:10:53 PM EDT
Link Posted: 5/19/2003 6:17:24 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/19/2003 6:20:44 PM EDT by Mucor]
Pretty good and fairly accurate info by cduarte. I have some expertise in this matter. The known sequale of sleep apnea ranges from excessive daytime sleepiness to depression and other psychofunctional dysorders which can cause a variety of functional problems and increased risk of death from motor vehicle crashes. It's also well known to cause physiologic problems such as hypertension, autonomic system dysfunction, nervous and cardiovascular diseases. The risk of premature death or serious health consequences of having severe sleep apnea is quite high. Bottom line: You should not ignore it as it is a very treatable condition. Although snoring/breath holding spells at night are common features, sleep apnea can sometimes exist without it. Also, not all snoring is sleep apnea. You'll need a sleep study to confirm the diagnosis as well as to titrate the pressure settings on the CPAP machine. This can take some time as there is usually a long waiting list to get a sleep study. CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure as described by cduarte) is very effective but the biggest problem is tolerance. About ~50% are able to tolerate it, if so great. With regard to surgery, there are many options depending on the nature of your anatomy. You'll want to speak with a otolaryngologist who specialized in sleep disorders if you find yourself not able to tolerate CPAP.
Link Posted: 5/19/2003 6:20:22 PM EDT
My father has it and got a CPAP machine as well. It looks like it would restrict your comfortable sleep positions some, but it is better than the alternative. It really changed his life as well, he was always tired, never getting a good nights sleep. And he snored like you would not believe, then he would start it where he would stop breathing for like 30 second stints repeatedly. Snore for a second, then hold breath again. Actually fairly scary to hear someone doing that, can't be good for you. The CPAP cleared all that up completely, he is much more healthly now, fully rested after a nights sleep, etc. BIG change.
Link Posted: 5/19/2003 7:02:38 PM EDT
At first I got this confused with narcolepsy. It wasn't as interesting as I thought it was going to be. [:(] I was thinking of this from Fight Club: Doc: No, you cannot die from insomnia. Narrator: What about narcolepsy? I nod off and wake up in strange places... Doc: You need to lighten up.
Link Posted: 5/19/2003 7:29:39 PM EDT
I don't know if I have Apnea, but I suspect I do. Mrs AZCOP says my snoring can get pretty bad, and it does wake me up sometimes, which really torques me off. The irony is that 20 years ago, when I weighed in at 250, I never snored, but at 190, my wife is close to smothering me with a pillow. Jay
Link Posted: 5/19/2003 7:43:23 PM EDT
If obstructive sleep apnea is diagnosed, another option is the Herbst mandibular repositioning device. It can be as effective as the CPAP machines and often more tolerable. Here's a website with a description of the device and how it works... look about halfway down the page... [url]http://www.quietsleep.com/prosites/snoredentist/appliance.cfm[/url] No affiliation, just the first Google hit I came across that has the info. Whatever you do, don't let it go untreated. Good luck!
Top Top