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Posted: 12/14/2013 8:35:51 AM EST
What can I expect?
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 9:08:07 AM EST
Any specific questions? My SO had one when she was in high school. She cannot physically push herself really hard for too long or else her heart will jump into a really erratic beat rate and she starts to hyperventilate. I have to squeeze and compress her chest in order for her to start breathing normally again. I don't know how it works, or why, but I can ask once she gets off work. I do know that as far as exercise goes, she can do it, she just has to go slower. She isn't a marathon runner, she just takes it slower and builds distance for health purposes if she runs. PM me some questions, if you want. I can relay them and PM the answers.
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 9:09:58 AM EST
Originally Posted By walt_l:
What can I expect?
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tag. learned i may have WPW and this is means of correction for the condition
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 9:12:04 AM EST
Is the the thing where they cauterize your heart to stop AFIB? If so, dad just had it (a month ago) - it took a very long time - something like 5 hours under anesthesia, but now, a month later, the results are just appearing, and seem to be good.

He only had pain in the groin (that's where they run the devices into your heart) and the normal residual crap from anesthesia.

Good luck/.
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 9:12:21 AM EST
If you do not mind me commenting, my father just went through two of these last year.

The first procedure they had done got something like 80% of what was causing his rhythm problems with his heart. He was always sleepy and was very pale all the time. His surgery took 2 hours and he spent 6 hours at the hospital afterward. He felt very good after the surgery and had regained some color and energy, but the doctor had said there is still a few spots he needs to go back in for. After the 2nd procedure, my father had a healthy color back to him and he was back to his old military sleep/wake schedule at 68. Granted, he still takes heart medication but the medication he is on now is very minor. He said he is glad he went through with it because he feels much better.
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 9:12:55 AM EST
I had WPW, was not a big deal as far as the operation went. My leg was sore for a few days but that was it....and they shave your junk.
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 9:19:52 AM EST
Yup had the catheter ablation.
pretty standard, well developed procedure, usually works the first time.
PM if you want to talk about it.
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 9:43:57 AM EST
[Last Edit: 12/14/2013 9:44:43 AM EST by WindKnot1-1]
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Originally Posted By Fullpower:
Yup had the catheter ablation.
pretty standard, well developed procedure, usually works the first time.
PM if you want to talk about it.
View Quote

Myself as well.

Outpatient "surgery", walked to the car to get home. Other than the wound on the inner thigh healing, no discomfort at all. No side effects, no special "precautions" to take afterward. I had a six month follow up and the Doctor kicked me loose for a year with no medications.

Basically what I had was not a "plumbing" problem, but an "electrical" problem. I had in essence an extra circuit that was triggering my heartbeat. I had an ablation. They don't enter the heart, but rather take care of that connection that runs on the outside of the heart.

Honest and truly, it's been a year with no side effects.

Oh, as I understand it, I believe we run a higher risk of a stroke. Not because of the procedure, but rather because of the condition that requires it.

Hope that helps.
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 12:32:06 PM EST
Well being a veteran of two ablations I can give you the scoop on mine.

A little background on what I was told that caused mine. In March of 1997 I had a Cosgrove o-ring sewn into my mitral valve as I had a severe heart murmur which placed me on track to eventually lead me into a enlarged heart. After the surgery things were great as I was an avid runner, triathlete and scuba diver. After the o-ring job I resumed my active life style without a care in the world.

In March of 2011 I felt a little sluggish and mentioned this to my cardiologist. That's when the A-Fib was discovered. It was basically caused by the scar tissue inside my heart from the o-ring job. Basically it short circuited, if you will, the electrical firing order. On his advice I proceeded with his recommendation for an ablation. It was done outside the Keys in a major hospital in Miami. They burned 85 plus locations in 2 1/2 hours. I stayed overnight due to the fact I live on a remote island and they just wanted to make sure the two entry holes in the groin (femoral arteries) were healed enough for travel. The next day I was on my way back to the Keys and took it easy for a few days due to the groin entry areas that needed further healing.

Fast forward to August of 2013. I started to become severely short of breath while just walking a few hundred yards. Not acceptable to an Ironman finisher. Off to see the cardiologist who immediately stated you need another ablation as things are not good. Within 2 weeks I was on the table for number 2. Of course I researched the "whys" of the need for another ablation. My nurse practitioner buddy advised me "to get my ass in gear and proceed", she's a tough chick. I found another physician who examined my past records and initially said he believed the major problem was in the upper chamber and not the lower due to historical data of people who had this o-ring job. As I mentioned from the most recent diagnosis to the table in two weeks. In the medical world that's fast.

So here is what they did in the 6 1/2 hours I was out.
>Extensive mapping of LA and RA performed. Re-entry appeared to be in RA.
>Ablation of CTIU performed. CL prolonged but arrhythmia did not terminate. Repeat mapping confirmed scar mediated AT in RA.
>Ablation of the isthmus performed and tachycardia terminated.
>PVI was performed. Isolation was confirmed.

So what to expect? I really can't say as my experiences were dependent on a past surgery of the heart and perhaps a not so thorough first ablation. I knew when I woke hope after the procedure that things were awesome. Again an overnight stay with a few days to allow the groin entry area/holes to heal. Feel great as I just returned from a hunting trip up and down the foothills of the Bighorn Mountains in Wyoming.

Go in with a positive attitude and they'll take good care of you. Research who is the top dog in your area. Don't be mislead it is a simple 1-2-3 and your up and back in the saddle. It all depends on what they see when they map you. The suckee part is the transesophageal echocardiogram which leaves your throat feeling like Linda Lovelace's must have.

Drop me a PM if you want and I'll give you my cell if you want more info.

Happy Trails Brother! You'll do fine.
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 12:41:47 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/14/2013 12:45:09 PM EST by Recusance]
I have had two proceedures.

Both have not fixed my problem.

I know it was no sure thing, but I guess I just came up snake eyes on it.

The recovery is long as far as blood thinners and being careful (being a cop is also not ideal while on blood thinners ) about 3 months worth.

But as far as surgeries go, pretty easy, Probably won't do it a third (and final attempt) time.

ETA by easy I mean no major stiches and pain, just a couple stitches at the groin and sore throat and a minor urinary tract infection from the catheter.
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 12:48:28 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Recusance:
I have had two proceedures.

Both have not fixed my problem.

I know it was no sure thing, but I guess I just came up snake eyes on it.

The recovery is long as far as blood thinners and being careful (being a cop is also not ideal while on blood thinners ) about 3 months worth.

But as far as surgeries go, pretty easy, Probably won't do it a third (and final attempt) time.
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Good point about the blood thinners. They are making me take the crap until March which is about 6 months. At least it's not Warfarin (rat poison shit) I'm on the big $ crap called Xarelto which is once a day and requires no monitoring. Guess it beats stroking out; that would call for one to the head.
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 1:46:10 PM EST
Had a Left Atrium ablation last March for Afib. Took eight hours to correct the signal paths that had formed at the juncture of the pulmonary veins. The result were almost immediately noticeable. I went from dragging ass to having a lot of energy by comparison. I was out for the entire time and had no issues in recovery.

Since then I've learned that the atrial ablation is much easier a ventricular ablation procedure to correct the premature ventricular contractions that I developed after the Afib was stopped. For that procedure I was kept awake the whole time and laying on the sensor pad had my back tweaked just enough to hurt like hell the whole six hour time I was on the table. I wish I could have been put out for that procedure.
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 1:52:35 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Sgt_Fish:


tag. learned i may have WPW and this is means of correction for the condition
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Originally Posted By Sgt_Fish:
Originally Posted By walt_l:
What can I expect?


tag. learned i may have WPW and this is means of correction for the condition


I have WPW, IM if you like
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 2:10:18 PM EST
Originally Posted By walt_l:
What can I expect?
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It really depends on the cause as to what the treatment will be.

There are multiple procedures with varying levels of invasive treatment to go along with them. You also may be limited to as what procedure your hospital can preform.

There is a Checkerboard open chest ablation wicth is reserved for the worst cases.
Then there are several catheter ablations using either heat or cold.

In any case, a specialist maps the electrical "short circuit" in the heart and scar/kill the tissue that's wrongly conducting electricity in the heart. It's the hope the scaring with stop the short circuit if you will.

Research I've read says cath ablation is about 50-75% effective with one procedure.....But studies are all over the place as to the actual success rates.

In my case, I did a cath heat ablation for WPW. I had a few setbacks afterward with afib, but within 6 months, my afib was almost totally gone. I still have a bout now and then, but it's manageable and really is of no concern. Knock on wood.

If your Afib is as bad as mine was, don't wait, get it done. It was FAR less stressful the an afib attack. Overnight in the hospital and a week at home taking it easy.
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