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Posted: 9/29/2005 1:27:31 PM EDT
Specifically Tanzania...more specifically the area around Mt Kilimanjaro.
Just curious what types of experiences US travelers have had in that region.

Thanks
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 1:28:47 PM EDT

Originally Posted By macro:
Specifically Tanzania...more specifically the area around Mt Kilimanjaro.
Just curious what types of experiences US travelers have had in that region.

Thanks



I predict great racism in this thread.
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 1:30:45 PM EDT

Anyone here ever been to Africa?


I used to work in West Philadelphia. Does that count?
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 1:30:57 PM EDT

Originally Posted By jquillen1985:

Originally Posted By macro:
Specifically Tanzania...more specifically the area around Mt Kilimanjaro.
Just curious what types of experiences US travelers have had in that region.

Thanks



I predict great racism in this thread.




I would hope not....I am just looking for info for an upcoming trip...if people dont have anything of value to add they should start their own thread...I dont need this one locked.

There must be some adventurers on this site with input....hope this is productive and not the usual GD locked-thread
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 1:31:35 PM EDT
I've been to South Africa, and Namibia.

Namibia was pretty cool. I never felt that wierd except when I was in the capital looking at streets named Fidel Castro Dr. ect.

South Africa, very scary. The south west, like Cape Town was fine and did not seem dangerous at all. The rest......look out.
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 1:31:42 PM EDT

Originally Posted By TheCommissioner:

Anyone here ever been to Africa?


I used to work in West Philadelphia. Does that count?




No, I live near there and I havent seen anything 19,340 ft in elevation around town
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 1:32:16 PM EDT

Originally Posted By TheCommissioner:

Anyone here ever been to Africa?


I used to work in West Philadelphia. Does that count?



I was going to ask if Detroit qualified.
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 1:37:39 PM EDT
Spent three months in Djibouti and a couple days in Kenya abouth this time last year. It's frickin' hot. Thats about the only useful info I can give. Didn't leave Camp Lemonier much except when I left. Stuck pretty close to Nairobi Airport when i was in Kenya. Did I mention it was hot? I have a pic of digital weather station reading 153 F at 80% humidity. Djibouti sucked. Kenya was ok. Saw some pics of nice places in Kenya, never saw them personally though. It actually wasn't as hot as Djibouti but was actually a lot closer to the equator. I actually crossed the equator to get to Kenya, didn't make much sense but oh well, whatever.
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 1:38:34 PM EDT

Originally Posted By mejames:

Originally Posted By TheCommissioner:

Anyone here ever been to Africa?


I used to work in West Philadelphia. Does that count?



I was going to ask if Detroit qualified.



Well, my prediction came true in less than two minutes.
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 1:39:39 PM EDT

Originally Posted By macro:
Specifically Tanzania...more specifically the area around Mt Kilimanjaro.
Just curious what types of experiences US travelers have had in that region.

Thanks

i was in northern africa(tunisia) when i was young... i think i was 7 or 8. most people weren't bad, but i do remember some people making fun of me for being a dirty American.
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 1:40:06 PM EDT

Originally Posted By jquillen1985:

Originally Posted By mejames:

Originally Posted By TheCommissioner:

Anyone here ever been to Africa?


I used to work in West Philadelphia. Does that count?



I was going to ask if Detroit qualified.



Well, my prediction came true in less than two minutes.



Wow. You call that racism?
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 1:43:10 PM EDT

Originally Posted By FooDog:

Originally Posted By jquillen1985:

Originally Posted By mejames:

Originally Posted By TheCommissioner:

Anyone here ever been to Africa?


I used to work in West Philadelphia. Does that count?



I was going to ask if Detroit qualified.



Well, my prediction came true in less than two minutes.



Wow. You call that racism?

some people are just overly sensitive. i hate that shit
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 1:47:40 PM EDT
In the interest of me actually getting an answer to what I asked in my thread, if people want to debate what is and what is not racist, or compare Africa to their local urban surroundings, please start your own thread for it.

I am looking for input on a region, not hosting a place for people to bicker about shit.
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 1:52:31 PM EDT

Originally Posted By macro:
In the interest of me actually getting an answer to what I asked in my thread, if people want to debate what is and what is not racist, or compare Africa to their local urban surroundings, please start your own thread for it.

I am looking for input on a region, not hosting a place for people to bicker about shit.



Most of the posters are uneducated and poorly-travelled people. I've got a friend that could help you out. What would you like to know?
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 1:54:51 PM EDT

Originally Posted By jquillen1985:

Originally Posted By macro:
In the interest of me actually getting an answer to what I asked in my thread, if people want to debate what is and what is not racist, or compare Africa to their local urban surroundings, please start your own thread for it.

I am looking for input on a region, not hosting a place for people to bicker about shit.



Most of the posters are uneducated and poorly-travelled people. I've got a friend that could help you out. What would you like to know?



sigh..... n/m.
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 1:55:43 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ArmyAirborne:
Spent three months in Djibouti and a couple days in Kenya abouth this time last year. It's frickin' hot. Thats about the only useful info I can give. Didn't leave Camp Lemonier much except when I left. Stuck pretty close to Nairobi Airport when i was in Kenya. Did I mention it was hot? I have a pic of digital weather station reading 153 F at 80% humidity. Djibouti sucked. Kenya was ok. Saw some pics of nice places in Kenya, never saw them personally though. It actually wasn't as hot as Djibouti but was actually a lot closer to the equator. I actually crossed the equator to get to Kenya, didn't make much sense but oh well, whatever.




Was in Djibouti for 8 months for their atfp mission. Boy did that suck...
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 2:09:53 PM EDT

Originally Posted By macro:
Specifically Tanzania...more specifically the area around Mt Kilimanjaro.
Just curious what types of experiences US travelers have had in that region.

Thanks



A friend of mine lived with the Masai tribe for a while... she loved it... I suggest you run away from the idea.



- BG
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 2:12:40 PM EDT
Way hot and don't drink the water....
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 2:38:09 PM EDT
Ive seen the rains down in Africa.
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 2:39:47 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/29/2005 2:42:33 PM EDT by Johninaustin]
South Africa, 7 times when my step-dad was alive. Hunting trips and then later just visits. Johannesburg is a very clean city, lots of scenery. Good fishing in country, (great white sharks abound offshore along with just about everything else) Praetoria not so nice, but certainly superior to say, the interior of Mexico. I was allowed to carry a pistol at age 14 there. The gunshops were awesome. MY step-dad RENTED me a .375. to hunt with.

Bottom line, Africa is not as safe as say, small town America, but I'd certainly feel more comfortable there than for example, the middle of Mexico city.

There is a whole lot of propaganda floating around about Africa, it's really a fantastic place. I hope to return there someday.

BTW: South Africa terrain and climate is EXACTLY the same as South Texas. You can't tell the pictures apart.
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 3:05:38 PM EDT
I spent 3 months in Kenya and 2 weeks in Zambia.

Huge difference. Zambia was a mess, Kenya was fine.
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 3:11:13 PM EDT
Somalia and Kenya.

Nuke it from orbit...it's the only way to be sure.
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 3:20:32 PM EDT
I've been to Uganda and Senegal. Yuck.
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 3:32:08 PM EDT

Originally Posted By AR15fan:
Somalia and Kenya.

Nuke it from orbit...it's the only way to be sure.



Ssshhhh.

You'll upset some of the hyper-sensative folks here.

Link Posted: 9/29/2005 3:36:36 PM EDT

Originally Posted By AR15fan:
Somalia and Kenya.

Nuke it from orbit...it's the only way to be sure.



You echo my sentiments.
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 3:42:43 PM EDT
Just Casablanca - sorry.
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 3:48:43 PM EDT
Zimbabwe two times. Ten years ago and seven years ago. Flew into Harare both times. It was a pretty backward place back then but whites were still running things so it was safe. I would not go back there now if you paid me to do it. First trip was up to the northern area hunting buffalo. The locals were well behaved and the white ranchers were good as gold. Next trip was to the Save Concervancy with Roger Whittall. Again the locals were no trouble at all. We did a lot of driving around both trips seeing the country and experiencing the real flavor of the small towns.

Things in Zim have gone to hell and it is so bad that there is nearly a bounty on white people. Stay away from that country. No gas, no food, no beer, police do what they please and see whites as an easy target for a shake down.

RSA two times. Last year and two years before that. Flew into Joberg both times. That city is a shit hole. The rest of the country is pretty nice. Hunted in Limpopo and Free State. Both areas are beautiful and the small towns appear to be quiet and safe for whites. RSA has a lot of interesting places to see. The historic battle sites from the war with the British, and the war with the Zulus are very interesting. The game parks are worth seeing. And Sun City is worth the trip also.

I have not been to Tanzania but have talked to people who have. They say it is safe for tourists but fairly expensive. They do not have a very well developed infrastructure so travel is slow and dangerous at night. If you get sick or hurt you are out of luck. I would recommend MedJet insurance. It is surprisingly cheap and the people who have had the need to use it usually owe their lives to the service.

Don't worry about drinking the water. If you are a tourist the water provided for you to drink has been boiled. The food is perfectly safe. I have never been sick from eating anything while in Africa. The tourist industry would not make much money if the work got out that people were getting sick. They take good care of you. If you are going into a malaria area then you need to take preventive precautions. That is no big deal. Just a pill once a week. The only thing I have ever been concerned about was driving on two lane rural highways. The pucker factor is pretty intense.

One more thing that Americans are not used to that you will encounter is that every person that does any service for you expects a tip. They are satisfied with a very small tip but they do expect something. An example is when you pull into an eating establishment or store parking lot there will be what appears to be a homeless person sitting on a stool at the enterance to the car park. He is the car watcher. His job it to keep an eye on the cars. He does not work for the business that you are patronising nor is any type of security guard. When you drive in you make eye contact and give a little nod. He will nod in return. You go in and eat and don't have to worry about the car. When you are finished and on the way out of the parking lot you stop next to him and give him a few coins. Ten cents US is plenty. Every one is happy. He makes a small living, you don't get your car fucked with, and the local criminals find a lot without a car watcher to do their thing.

Link Posted: 9/29/2005 4:03:06 PM EDT
I worked in Angola for six months in the oil business. Am currently working in a shipyard in Singapore getting a major oil project ready to go to Nigeria. Lots of things I can tell you. Always travel with a guide or security. Also check with your doctor before you go. He/she may want to put you on malaria medicine. Also learn some good hygene when it comes to food and drink (ie. bottled water only, peel your fruit, hand sanitizers, etc). Make sure your shots are up to date. Lots of things to consider. IM me for more info.
PS. Expect to be hassled. Nature of the beast.
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 4:03:42 PM EDT
Originally Posted By jquillen1985:

Look at me, I'm uber-educated and well travelled. I am a sophisticated nuanced individual. If I am making no sense to anyone here it's because you're all stupid. BRB GTG get the sand out of my mangina.

Link Posted: 9/29/2005 4:15:29 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/29/2005 4:15:45 PM EDT by DK-Prof]
I've been to Africa a number of times - but never Tanzania. I would LOVE to see Kilimanjaro, and perhaps get a chance to see Tsavo, and the railroad bridge (where the man-eating lions ate tons of people).


I've been to South Africa (and some of the homelands - Swaziland, Lesotho), as well as Morocco - which is hardly really "Africa" in the sense that people often think of Africa as.

I've also been to Nigeria a number of times. Boy, what a shithole!


If you go with a well-established and reputable organizer of tours/excursions, you'll probably be fine, because they will have paid all the right bribes, known what areas to avoid etc. If you strike out on your own, I'm sure you can have a good time, but it's probably a little more risky.

Tourists are often safe in Africa, even though it can be a terrible place - but it's important to remember that the value of human life there can be VERY LOW, and you need to plan accordingly.
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 4:27:41 PM EDT

Macro,
I've done medical missions in Kenya and Tanzania in '04 and '05. Specifically, we worked in the area around Iringa and Mbeya in southern Tanzania this year. I have seen Kilimanjaro from the plane and it is incredibly beautiful. Also worked with a pastor from there and may be doing medical missions near Kilimanjaro next summer-- yet to be decided.

It was a great experience for me, and something I hope to do every year for the rest of my life. When I am able, I would like to spend months at a time in Africa. Mombasa has some great folks, but I liked the people in Tanzania more. Kenyans tend to speak more English than Tanzanians, but language shouldn't stop you. Learn a little Swahili and get a phrasebook-- Swahili speakers are very tolerant of non-native speakers in my experience.

Be careful where you go-- certainly don't let just anyone lead you off into the dark recesses of a village or a city alleyway. 99% of east africans are great folks, but they've got a few real crooks just like we do. A trustworthy local guide is a good idea.

I know that was pretty general. If I can answer any questions IM me.

P.S.- Don't drink the water. (The Swahili for 'safe water' is 'maji safi' pronounced [MAH-jee SAH-fee])
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 4:35:31 PM EDT
Take numerous large guns and copious amounts of ammo for those numerous, large guns.
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 4:48:16 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/29/2005 4:59:37 PM EDT by Jack19]
I've been to "Africa" or, more accurately, Rhodesia, back when there was such a place. But, I doubt my travels as a teenager in the mid/late 70s would be of help today. Times were different then.

Get your self a professional travel agency, with professional contacts in the region. You risk your life to do otherwise. Ignore whatever you read here about anecdotal experiences. In Africa, yesterday is 100 years ago; particularly true in the less civilized areas.

Contact the State Department for the latest travel advisories. They are available online but can be dated, call for the most recent information. Here's the latest online advisory....

From here: travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_1038.html

Tanzania (Zanzibar)
April 06, 2005

COUNTRY DESCRIPTION: Tanzania is a developing East African nation. Tourist facilities are available in major cities and selected game parks, but limited in other areas. The legislative capital is Dodoma and the U.S. Embassy is located in Dar es Salaam. Read the Department of State Background Notes on Tanzania for additional information.

ENTRY/EXIT REQUIREMENTS: A passport and visa are required for travel to Tanzania. U.S. citizens with valid passports may obtain a visa either before arriving in Tanzania or at any port of entry staffed by immigration officials. U.S. passports should be valid for a minimum of six months beyond the date the visa is obtained, whether it is acquired beforehand or at the port of entry. Also, foreigners are required to show their passports when entering or exiting the islands of Unguja (more commonly known as, and hereafter referred to as, Zanzibar) and Pemba. Visitors are required to have a valid yellow fever inoculation stamp on their international health cards. See our Foreign Entry Requirements brochure for more information on Tanzania and other countries.

Detailed entry information may be obtained from the Tanzanian Embassy at 2139 R Street, NW, Washington, DC 20008, telephone (202) 939-6125; or the Tanzanian Permanent Mission to the United Nations at 205 East 42nd Street, 13th Floor, New York, NY 10017, telephone (212) 972-9160. Overseas, inquiries may be made at the nearest Tanzanian embassy or consulate.

Travelers are reminded to safeguard their U.S. passports while in Tanzania. Passport loss can lead to delays in departing the country and can cause disruption of travel. Tanzanian authorities require that travelers who are not in possession of the visa and entry stamps obtained upon admission to Tanzania visit the immigration office prior to departure to regularize their status. Persons attempting to depart the country without proper documentation may be subject to fines or delays in departure.

Read our information on dual nationality and the prevention of international child abduction at http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_1469.html. For Customs Information see http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_1468.html.

SAFETY AND SECURITY: On November 28, 2002, there was a car-bomb attack on a hotel in Mombasa, Kenya, approximately 50 miles north of the Kenya-Tanzania border, in which 15 people were killed, and an unsuccessful attempt to shoot down an Israeli charter plane departing Mombasa. These incidents highlight the continuing threat posed by terrorism in East Africa and the capacity of terrorist groups to carry out attacks. U.S. citizens should be aware of the risk of indiscriminate attacks on civilian targets in public places, including tourist sites and other places where Westerners are known to congregate.

Political tension on Zanzibar and Pemba can be extremely high. In the past, riot police have clashed violently with demonstrators on several occasions, and a number of small explosions have occurred on Zanzibar and Pemba islands, as well as on the mainland. U.S. citizens are reminded that violent demonstrations and bombings could recur with little warning. To avoid potential violence, travelers should maintain a high level of security vigilance at all times and avoid political rallies and related public gatherings.

In July 2004, a group of volunteer conservation workers were attacked on Pemba Island. Two of the group suffered gunshot wounds.

Political demonstrations and civil unrest occur intermittently in Zanzibar. Small-scale attacks, possibly linked to religious or political extremists, have occurred sporadically since 2000. Throughout the spring of 2004, a series of small explosive devices exploded in and around Stonetown. Some attacks have occurred in tourist areas, such as bars or restaurants where alcohol is served. The most recent series of attacks caused minimal damage and no injuries. Historically, political conflict on Zanzibar has increased during electoral campaigns, and in the immediate aftermath of an election. Tanzania will have general elections on October 30, 2005. Travelers to the area should monitor the situation, and take care to avoid political gatherings and demonstrations, especially on Zanzibar.

Some Zanzibari newspapers have warned that women who dress immodestly may be subject to harassment. American citizens are advised to dress modestly and to refrain from intemperate public behavior.

The area near Tanzania's borders with Rwanda and Burundi has been the site of minor military clashes, and refugee flows across the borders into Tanzania continue. There have been a number of incidents of criminal and violent activity in the region. Travelers to this area should exercise caution. U.S. officials when traveling near the border with Rwanda, following UN security procedures, may request police escorts on parts of the Rusomo to Kahama road because of an increase in armed bandit attacks.

On August 7, 1998, terrorists bombed the U.S. Embassy in Dar es Salaam. The United States has had excellent cooperation with Tanzanian police and security forces since the bombing. However, Tanzania’s borders remain porous, and Americans should remain aware of their surroundings.

For the latest security information, Americans traveling abroad should regularly monitor the Department’s Internet web site at http://travel.state.gov where the current Worldwide Caution Public Announcement, Travel Warnings and Public Announcements can be found.

Up-to-date information on safety and security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll free in the U.S., or for callers outside the U.S. and Canada, a regular toll-line at 1-202-501-4444. These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).

The Department of State urges American citizens to take responsibility for their own personal security while traveling overseas. For general information about appropriate measures travelers can take to protect themselves in an overseas environment, see the Department of State’s pamphlet A Safe Trip Abroad at http://travel.state.gov/travel/tips/safety/safety_1747.html.

CRIME: Crime is a serious problem in Tanzania, and visitors should be alert and cautious. Street crime in Dar es Salaam is common and includes mugging, vehicle theft, "smash and grab" attacks on vehicles, armed robbery, and burglary. Crime involving firearms is becoming more common. A series of robberies involving increasing levels of violence has occurred along the coast and in Zanzibar and Pemba. Robbers have held up tour buses and dive boats at gunpoint. Several of these incidents have resulted in injuries to tourists. Thieves and pickpockets on buses and trains steal from inattentive passengers.

Pedestrians on beaches and footpaths, whether in isolated areas or in popular tourist venues, are often targeted for robbery or assault. This is especially true on Zanzibar and in Dar es Salaam and its environs. Visitors should limit the amount of cash they carry and leave valuables, such as passports, jewelry and airline tickets, in a hotel safe or other secure place. Cameras are highly coveted by thieves, and should be guarded carefully. Because of the potential for fraud, credit cards should only be used in reputable tourist hotels. Rapes involving tourists are also an increasing concern. Female travelers are warned to avoid walking alone after dark.

Carjackings have occurred in both rural and urban areas. Visitors are advised to drive with doors locked and windows rolled up. Travelers are urged not to stop between populated areas and to travel in convoys if possible.

INFORMATION FOR VICTIMS OF CRIME: The loss or theft abroad of a U.S. passport should be reported immediately to the local police and the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate. If you are the victim of a crime while overseas, in addition to reporting to local police, please contact the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate for assistance. The Embassy/Consulate staff can, for example, assist you to find appropriate medical care, contact family members or friends and explain how funds could be transferred. Although the investigation and prosecution of the crime is solely the responsibility of local authorities, consular officers can help you to understand the local criminal justice process and to find an attorney if needed.

See our information on Victims of Crime at http://travel.state.gov/travel/tips/emergencies/emergencies_1748.html.

MEDICAL FACILITIES AND OTHER HEALTH INFORMATION: Medical facilities are limited and medicines are sometimes unavailable, even in Dar es Salaam. There are hospitals on Zanzibar that can treat minor ailments. For any major medical problems, including dental work, travelers should consider obtaining medical treatment in Nairobi or South Africa where more advanced medical care is available.

Cholera is prevalent in many areas of Tanzania, and several strains of malaria are endemic. Malaria suppressants are advised, and travelers are strongly advised to carry malaria suppressants with them. Visitors should consult their physicians before traveling to learn about prophylaxis and the possible side effects of various available medications.

P. falciparum malaria, the serious and sometimes fatal strain of malaria in Tanzania, is resistant to the anti-malarial drug chloroquine. Because travelers to Tanzania are at high risk for contracting malaria, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) advises that travelers should take one of the following antimalarial drugs: mefloquine (Lariam™), doxycycline, or atovaquone/proguanil (Malarone™). The CDC has determined that a traveler who is on an appropriate antimalarial drug has a greatly reduced chance of contracting the disease.

In addition, other personal protective measures, such as the use of insect repellents, help to reduce malaria risk. Travelers who become ill with a fever or flu-like illness while traveling in a malaria-risk area and up to one year after returning home should seek prompt medical attention and tell the physician their travel history and what antimalarials they have been taking. For additional information on malaria, protection from insect bites, and antimalarial drugs, please visit the CDC travel health web site at http://www.cdc.gov/travel/malinfo.htm.

Information on vaccinations and other health precautions, such as safe food and water precautions and insect bite protection, may be obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s hotline for international travelers at 1-877-FYI-TRIP (1-877-394-8747); fax 1-888-CDC-FAXX (1-888-232-3299), or via the CDC’s Internet site at http://www.cdc.gov/travel. For information about outbreaks of infectious diseases abroad consult the World Health Organization’s (WHO) website at http://www.who.int/en. Further health information for travelers is available at http://www.who.int/ith.

MEDICAL INSURANCE: The Department of State strongly urges Americans to consult with their medical insurance company prior to traveling abroad to confirm whether their policy applies overseas and whether it will cover emergency expenses such as a medical evacuation. Please see our information on medical insurance overseas at http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_1470.html.

TRAFFIC SAFETY AND ROAD CONDITIONS: While in a foreign country, U.S. citizens may encounter road conditions that differ significantly from those in the United States. The information below concerning Tanzania is provided for general reference only and may not be totally accurate in a particular location or circumstance.

Road and traffic conditions in Tanzania differ markedly from those found in the United States and present hazards that require drivers to exercise continual alertness and caution.

Traffic in Tanzania moves on the left. Drivers and pedestrians alike must maintain vigilance, looking both ways before turning or crossing a road.

Drivers are advised against nighttime travel. Roadways are often not marked and many lack both streetlights and shoulders. Pedestrians, cyclists, and animals are often encountered on unlit roads after dark, as are slow-moving trucks and cars traveling without lights. Car-jacking and other related crimes are more common during the nighttime hours. Traveling in rural areas after dark is strongly discouraged.

Although a number of inter-city highways are periodically repaved and maintained, maintenance schedules are erratic and even good roads may deteriorate precipitously in periods of inclement weather. During the rainy season (late March to mid-June), many roads in Tanzania, both urban and rural, are passable only with four-wheel-drive vehicles.

In urban areas, it is common to find main arterial roads paved and maintained, while secondary streets are severely rutted and passable only with high-clearance vehicles. Traffic lights are often out of order, and care should be exercised at any traffic intersection, whether controlled or not, as many drivers disregard signals.

Excessive speed, unpredictable driving habits, and the lack of basic safety equipment on many vehicles pose serious traffic hazards.

Tanzanian law requires all motor vehicle operators to be in possession of a valid driver’s license. Persons staying in Tanzania for six months or less may use a valid U.S. driver’s license after validation by local traffic authorities, or an international driver’s license. Persons intending to remain in Tanzania for more than six months are required to obtain a Tanzanian driver’s license. All vehicles are required to carry third-party liability insurance.

Tanzania’s traffic regulations are governed by the Road Traffic Act of 1973. Some subsequent legislation has amended the 1973 act by requiring, for example, the use of seat belts. However, other aspects of modern driving, such as the use of child seats, are not addressed or required by Tanzanian law.

Please refer to our Road Safety page for more information at http://travel.state.gov/travel/tips/safety/safety_1179.html.

AVIATION SAFETY: As there is no direct commercial air service between the United States and Tanzania, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has not assessed Tanzania Civil Aviation Authority for compliance with ICAO international aviation safety standards. For more information, travelers may visit the FAA’s internet web site at www.faa.gov/avr/iasa/index.cfm.

SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES: Tanzania offers opportunities for observation of wildlife in its natural habitat. Many tour operators offer structured, safe excursions into parks and other wildlife viewing areas for close observation of flora and fauna. However, travelers should bear in mind that they, too, must play a responsible role in maintaining safety. Tourists are mauled or killed each year as a result of having relaxed their vigilance. Tourists are reminded to maintain a safe distance from animals and to remain in vehicles or other protected enclosures when venturing into game parks.

Inter-city transportation routes between major destinations such as Arusha and Dar es Salaam are serviced by a variety of carriers that offer differing levels of safety and comfort. U.S. citizens who travel by bus are urged to select carriers who use modern equipment and to avoid utilizing vehicles that are in obvious disrepair.

In-town transportation is best accomplished using taxis or hired drivers from a reputable source. Travelers should be wary of using the ubiquitous microbuses (dala-dalas), which are frequently overcrowded, poorly maintained, a common site of petty theft, and whose operation is generally unsafe.

Although the bilateral consular convention between the United States and Tanzania requires that Tanzanian police and prison officials inform the U.S. Embassy of the arrest or detention of U.S. citizens, they have consistently failed to do so, especially in rural areas. U.S. citizens are encouraged to carry a copy of their U.S. passport with them at all times, so that, if questioned by local officials, proof of identity and U.S. citizenship are readily available. Travelers and U.S. citizens resident in Tanzania are strongly urged to maintain legal immigration status while in Tanzania to avoid difficulties with local immigration authorities. U.S. citizens who are arrested or detained have the right, under both the bilateral consular convention and the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations, to have the U.S. Embassy notified of their situation and should request that notification be made, if it is not done.

Credit cards may be used at some major hotels, but are not widely accepted in Tanzania. Travelers may obtain advances, in the form of U.S. travelers checks or cash (in Tanzanian shillings), from only two sources in Dar es Salaam and two on Zanzibar. Visitors should bring sufficient cash or travelers checks for their trip. In addition, in the larger urban areas, ATM machines are usually available at major banks. Travelers are advised to check with their home banking institution regarding international ATM use.

Photography of military installations is forbidden. Individuals have been detained and/or had their cameras and film confiscated for taking pictures of hospitals, schools, bridges, industrial sites, and airports. Installations that are prohibited from being photographed are not always marked.

CHILDREN'S ISSUES: For information on international adoption of children and international parental child abduction, see the Office of Children’s Issues website at http://travel.state.gov/family/family_1732.html.

REGISTRATION / EMBASSY LOCATION: Americans living or traveling in Tanzania are encouraged to register with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate through the State Department’s travel registration website, https://travelregistration.state.gov, and to obtain updated information on travel and security within Tanzania. Americans without Internet access may register directly with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate. By registering, American citizens make it easier for the Embassy or Consulate to contact them in case of emergency. The U.S. Embassy is located at 686 Old Bagamoyo Road, Kinondoni District, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. The international mailing address is Post Office Box 9123, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania; telephone [255](22) 266-8001 and fax [255](22) 266-8238. Office hours are 7:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Thursday, and 7:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. on Friday. Travelers may also contact the U.S. Embassy in Tanzania via email at consulardx@state.gov. Additional information may be found at the Embassy’s website at http://usembassy.state.gov/tanzania.

* * *

This replaces the Consular Information Sheet dated August 25, 2004, to update the sections on Country Description, Entry/Exit Requirements, Safety and Security, Crime, Information for Victims of Crime, Medical Facilities and Other Health Information, Medical Insurance, Traffic Safety and Road Conditions, Aviation Safety, Special Circumstances, Children’s Issues, and Registration/Embassy Location.


Link Posted: 9/29/2005 5:14:12 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 1911lover:
Take numerous large guns and copious amounts of ammo for those numerous, large guns.



Surprisingly you would not have any trouble at all taking a handgun into RSA, and I believe Zimbabwe, or Tanz. However If you cap a black African you are automatically guilty and it will cost you 1/2 a steer paid to the local magistrate to get you out of jail.

Many businesses have a security guard at the door with a metal detector wand. He will find the piece and advise you to go leave it in your car.

Link Posted: 9/29/2005 5:16:50 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/29/2005 5:18:25 PM EDT by BigB1129]
South Africa is no good. Very different from the rest. Have a bunch of friends from West Africa, Ivory Coast and some countries in the middle. They say Americans are well liked. Depends on where you go.
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 5:20:28 PM EDT

My sister in law is from Durbin SA and I have a buddy from Kenya. I have never been over there but from talking to them I will say that my Kenyian buddy always says "There is no mercy in Africa". I would take that to heart. I want to go to Kenya and my friend always offers to take me when he goes on his once a year trip. I just can't tale that much time off work. He tells me do not go without him. I know he is right. My sister in law left and so have all of her family excep her parents. It isn't pretty in SA from what I hear.
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 5:40:31 PM EDT
I have been to beautiful Somalia. All expenses paid courtisy of the USMC.
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 6:50:29 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Johninaustin:
South Africa, 7 times when my step-dad was alive. Hunting trips and then later just visits. Johannesburg is a very clean city, lots of scenery. Good fishing in country, (great white sharks abound offshore along with just about everything else) Praetoria not so nice, but certainly superior to say, the interior of Mexico. I was allowed to carry a pistol at age 14 there. The gunshops were awesome. MY step-dad RENTED me a .375. to hunt with.

Bottom line, Africa is not as safe as say, small town America, but I'd certainly feel more comfortable there than for example, the middle of Mexico city.

There is a whole lot of propaganda floating around about Africa, it's really a fantastic place. I hope to return there someday.

BTW: South Africa terrain and climate is EXACTLY the same as South Texas. You can't tell the pictures apart.


I don't know when the last time you were in Joberg, but it has changed drasticly based on your description. So have the gun laws. Joberg was the scariest place in all of South Africa, and we drove almost across the entire country to Cape Town last year.

Link Posted: 9/29/2005 6:54:34 PM EDT
Thank god no.
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 6:55:31 PM EDT

Originally Posted By chips:

Originally Posted By macro:
Specifically Tanzania...more specifically the area around Mt Kilimanjaro.
Just curious what types of experiences US travelers have had in that region.

Thanks

i was in northern africa(tunisia) when i was young... i think i was 7 or 8. most people weren't bad, but i do remember some people making fun of me for being a dirty American.




That speaks for it self, your dirty but i live in a hut made of pig shit.
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 7:04:41 PM EDT

Originally Posted By natedogg42:
Originally Posted By jquillen1985:

Look at me, I'm uber-educated and well travelled. I am a sophisticated nuanced individual. If I am making no sense to anyone here it's because you're all stupid. BRB GTG get the sand out of my mangina.




Nice assessment, +1
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 7:07:48 PM EDT
My mom says there's lots of black people in africa.

Link Posted: 9/29/2005 7:10:24 PM EDT
Does having sex with a beautiful black woman count as being in Africa?
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 7:14:25 PM EDT

Originally Posted By MST2:
Does having sex with a beautiful black woman count as being in Africa?



Only if her name is 'Africa'.
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 8:13:44 PM EDT
Call the peace corps. Get a contact email for someone serving near where you want to go, ask them about places to stay (cheap) and transportation. They may have established reliable relationships with a driver, hotels (cheap), and local restaurants. This is particularly useful info for the cheap traveler. Make sure to ask them what you can bring them from CONUS. You might be surprised, sometimes it is Immodium othertimes kellogs cornflakes.
Check out Lonely Planet.com they have a section "thorn tree"message board you may be able to get specific questions answered....or not. Check out every travel book for the region from your local library, you might be surprised at how well traveled a book can get in a week or two, don't forget to return it to avoid fines. I would recomend taking clothes that you fully intend to leave, just my take on things. A collared shirt can convey a level of respect a lot faster than 10 minutes of pantamime with most govmnt offals. Happy Trails. Bsafe
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 8:42:51 PM EDT
See if there are any current travel advisories for the region. Situations on the ground with many of the .govs in Africa can change at the drop of a hat.

Also, read the CIA World Factbook report on Tanzania.

Link here; www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/geos/tz.html
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 8:49:41 PM EDT
If you are black, when you try to leave expect to be hassled and possibly jailed for suspicion of trying to sneak out with fake papers.

Some of our black engineers spent time in jail because of this.
Link Posted: 9/30/2005 4:20:57 AM EDT
Zaire (The Congo), Kenya, and Cameroon in the 1980s.

Zaire was (is) the Earth's asshole.
Link Posted: 9/30/2005 4:27:37 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/30/2005 4:29:09 AM EDT by Hokie]

Originally Posted By ODA_564:
Zaire (The Congo), Kenya, and Cameroon in the 1980s.

Zaire was (is) the Earth's asshole.



All this time I thought the asshole of planet Earth was Mexico
Link Posted: 9/30/2005 4:30:29 AM EDT

Originally Posted By chips: but i do remember some people making fun of me for being a dirty American.
Ha Ha Ha Ha! I'm sure you noticed the questionable sanitation over there. Big talk for people who haven't mastered plumbing.
Link Posted: 9/30/2005 4:36:31 AM EDT
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