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Posted: 5/18/2005 12:50:25 PM EDT
Link Posted: 5/18/2005 12:52:18 PM EDT
Link Posted: 5/18/2005 12:52:26 PM EDT
I could send you a fast, easy and tasty recipe like I did for TheRedGoat, but he hasn't thanked me for that one yet or even aknowledged that he received it.

Cheffin ain't Easy.
Link Posted: 5/18/2005 12:53:35 PM EDT

General Tso's Chicken a la GOOGLE

It's not authentically Chinese, but it's nevertheless one of the most popular dishes at Chinese restaurants here on the East Coast and elsewhere. General Tso's Chicken is very inexpensive to make, but most restaurants charge rather a lot for it, usually putting it with "Chef's Specialities" and the like on the menu, rather than with the ordinary chicken dishes. No fair! This is how to make it.

1 lb chicken thighs, boned and cubed
3 eggs, beaten
1/2 cup and 2 tsp cornstarch
5 dried pepper pods
1-1/2 tbsp rice vinegar
2 tbsp rice wine
3 tbsp sugar
3 tbsp soy sauce
In a large bowl, thoroughly blend the 1/2 cup of cornstarch and the eggs; add the chicken and toss to coat. If the mixture bonds too well, add some vegetable oil to separate the pieces.

In a small bowl, prepare the sauce mixture by combining the 2 tsp cornstarch with the wine, vinegar, sugar and soy sauce.

First-Stage Frying: Heat 1-2 inches of peanut oil in a wok to medium-high heat (350-400o). Fry the chicken in small batches, just long enough to cook the chicken through. Remove the chicken to absorbent paper and allow to stand (this step can be performed well in advance, along with the sauce mixture, with both refrigerated).

Second-Stage Frying: Leave a tablespoon or two of the oil in the wok. Add the pepper pods to the oil and stir-fry briefly, awakening the aroma but not burning them. Return the chicken to the wok and stir-fry until the pieces are crispy brown.

The General's Favorite Sauce: Add the sauce-mixture to the wok, tossing over the heat until the sauce caramelizes into a glaze (1-2 minutes). Serve immediately. Serves 4, along with steamed broccoli and rice.

Variations and Substitutions

Sherry substitutes well for the rice wine, but avoid "cooking sherry" if you can. Sugar in the sauce ranges from as little as a few teaspoons to a full half-cup in some recipes. Soy sauce, too, varies dramatically, rising as high as double that listed above. Nearly any sort of vinegar can be used. In some recipes, a tablespoon of soy sauce is added to the egg-and-cornstarch blend. In others, the chicken itself is marinated before being used, in either soy, wine, vinegar, or some combination of those.

Many recipes include a much lighter egg-and-cornstarch coating for the chicken (about 2 tbsp of starch and two eggs). I prefer the heavier coating; adjust to taste.

Optional Sauce Ingredients: A grind of fresh black pepper, a teaspoon of sesame oil, a teaspoon of MSG, a clove or two of garlic, a couple of fresh chopped scallions or green onions, 1-2 teaspoons of Chinese chili sauce, fresh ginger, a teaspoon of hoisin sauce, the minced rind of an orange, and many other items may be added to the sauce. Any vegetal additions should be added to the oil along with the chicken (the ginger can burn easily - add it last).

Light Tso Sauce: The traditional sauce for General Tso's is a heavy, spicy glaze, different from the lighter broth-based sauces found on most other Chinese dishes. Some prefer a lighter Tso sauce, too, and this can be achieved by tripling the cornstarch in the sauce and adding a half-cup of fluid. The "fluid" can be chicken broth, water, or even fruit juice (both orange and pineapple have been used). Cook the sauce only 'til it thickens, instead of waiting for a glaze. This version of the sauce is actually more common in the local restaurants; if you're a Tso fan, it might be what you're used to.

History

General Zou Zong-Tang was a general of the Qing (Manchu) Dynasty of China, responsible for supressing Muslim uprisings. His name was used to frighten Muslim children for centuries after his death. It is questionable whether or not the General (or his quartermaster) actually invented General Tso's Chicken . . . it may have been the invention of Taiwanese immigrants to the United States and Europe. Alternate spellings include General Cho, General Zo, General Zhou, General Jo, and General Tzo. It is pronounced "Djo," with the tongue hard against teeth.

Notes

The basis for this recipe was compiled from over forty different versions of the dish, combining the best aspects of each, averaging sauce ratios, and simplifying the basic dish to it's core ingredients.
Link Posted: 5/18/2005 12:59:07 PM EDT
Link Posted: 5/18/2005 12:59:53 PM EDT
I like it better with white meat
Link Posted: 5/18/2005 1:00:08 PM EDT
Link Posted: 5/18/2005 1:01:21 PM EDT
Link Posted: 5/18/2005 1:02:43 PM EDT
cat, chopped and deep fried
Link Posted: 5/18/2005 1:04:35 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 1GUNRUNNER:

Originally Posted By Wave:
I usually drive to the local Chinese Kitchen and say #4 please



You gonna make some man real happy some day.



Jealous ??
Link Posted: 5/18/2005 1:07:31 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 1GUNRUNNER:

Originally Posted By dvr9:
I could send you a fast, easy and tasty recipe like I did for TheRedGoat, but he hasn't thanked me for that one yet or even aknowledged that he received it.

Cheffin ain't Easy.



I ain't TRG! There is a lot of things he ain't thanked me for, the ungrateful bastard.

What did you send him a recipe for?



So we've heard! He wanted a recipe for rattlesnake. I gave him a fast and easy (because that is how he likes his snake) recipe for Rattle Snake Marsala.
Link Posted: 5/18/2005 1:08:35 PM EDT
Link Posted: 5/18/2005 1:12:46 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 82ndAbn:
How did General Tso get his own chicken recipe anyway?



Had to out do Colonel Sanders I'm guessing.
Link Posted: 5/18/2005 1:13:22 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 1GUNRUNNER:

Originally Posted By callgood:
General Tso's Chicken a la GOOGLE



I am familiar with Google

I was looking for some personal ones.



Gen Tso took his personal recipe to the grave with him
Link Posted: 5/18/2005 1:17:18 PM EDT
My favorite Chinese dish.

I tried to make it once.

I couldn't find a good recipe, but eventually went with one.

I followed it to a T--or so I thought.

I spent about $25 on the ingredients.

After two hours of toil...


TOTAL SHIT!

I had to throw it all away.

It was HORRIBLE.

Do yourself a favor and just order out.
Link Posted: 5/18/2005 1:17:31 PM EDT
Link Posted: 5/18/2005 1:18:17 PM EDT
Link Posted: 5/18/2005 1:20:40 PM EDT
Link Posted: 5/18/2005 1:44:41 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Wave:
I usually drive to the local Chinese Kitchen and say #4 please



+1
Link Posted: 5/18/2005 1:52:01 PM EDT
Link Posted: 5/18/2005 1:52:22 PM EDT
I don't have a recipe but only one place makes what I consider good General Tso's chicken. Leo's Peking Place in Stillwater, OK right across from the OSU campus.

Nothing but chunks of chicken (I think mainly dark meat and definately NOT breaded) and approximately 1" square chunks of green bellpepper in the sweetest and tangiest sauce I've ever had. I've been eating there for over ten years and always thought it was a ginger sauce but the menu says it's a garlic sauce.

I've thought about offering some serious cash to the owner if she'll teach me how to make it.
Link Posted: 5/18/2005 2:48:44 PM EDT
Chix thigh, cubed and marinated. all purpose marinade i've seen in way too many chinese resaturants:
corn flour, oil, salt, white pepper, msg, egg white in some joints, white wine in some(xhaoxing or sherry would be more appropriate). This is the basis for many meat and seafood marinades-called velveting.

Fry and toss with the sauce.
Link Posted: 5/18/2005 3:31:09 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 1GUNRUNNER:

Originally Posted By dvr9:
So we've heard! He wanted a recipe for rattlesnake. I gave him a fast and easy (because that is how he likes his snake) recipe for Rattle Snake Marsala.



Funny....He ate my snake while there.

Other than drying it out he said it was pretty good.

1GUN(ThereArePictures)RUNNER



He ate your snake dry? Boy you must be spent!
Link Posted: 5/18/2005 3:35:08 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Wave:
I usually drive to the local Chinese Kitchen and say #4 please



I do the same thing, except it's #19.
Link Posted: 5/18/2005 9:47:23 PM EDT

Originally Posted By jmzd4:
cat, chopped and deep fried



I think the "patch tabby" has the best cut of meat. Not as dry as "Maine coon".
Link Posted: 5/18/2005 10:18:29 PM EDT
Link Posted: 5/18/2005 10:36:16 PM EDT
I go to the "Happy U"down the street and let them make it for me!
Link Posted: 5/18/2005 10:37:23 PM EDT
Link Posted: 5/18/2005 10:52:56 PM EDT
Just a thought.....if truth in advertising caught up with Chinese, and IF they did use cat.....would it be called:
Moo Goo Gai Pussy
General Tsao's Pussy
Egg Drop Pussy
Lemon Pussy
Cashew Pussy.
Pussy Lo Mein


I personally Love chinese food, and.....well.....I don't think I'll ever get enough pussy.

Lets combine them.
Link Posted: 5/19/2005 5:01:33 AM EDT


Got to use chestnut flour to make it right.
Link Posted: 5/19/2005 6:13:24 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/19/2005 6:14:24 AM EDT by darwindog]
This site has recipes for tons of stuff you wish you could make at home.

copykat.com
Link Posted: 5/19/2005 6:19:31 AM EDT
Much cheaper and faster to order take out, specify white meat.
Link Posted: 5/19/2005 6:26:27 AM EDT
Who is General Tso and why are we eating his chicken?
Link Posted: 5/19/2005 9:44:47 AM EDT
Iron Chef makes a very respectable General Tso's cooking sauce.
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