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Posted: 9/12/2004 1:51:27 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/12/2004 1:51:47 PM EST by CFII]
It looks very well made, and interesting. Starts at 9, 8CT. I think it will be a good watch.
Link Posted: 9/12/2004 1:52:06 PM EST
I will. I always jump at a chance to learn more about this country and how it came to be. I wish much of the population thought like I did.
Link Posted: 9/12/2004 1:58:19 PM EST

If wifey lets me
Link Posted: 9/12/2004 2:01:26 PM EST
SPOILER ...

We win.
Link Posted: 9/12/2004 2:04:17 PM EST

Originally Posted By DzlBenz:
SPOILER ...

We win.




really? Dammit. Its all ruined for me now




Link Posted: 9/12/2004 2:05:11 PM EST
You may have beat us in 1776 but payback is a bitch!

"A City in Flames
Once they arrived in Washington, the British went right to work. In 24 hours they set fire to most of the major government buildings including the Capitol, the Treasury, the White House and the Library of Congress as well as a several private buildings among them two built by George Washington. Only the timely intervention of Dr. William Thornton, superintendent of patents, saved the building that housed the Patent Office and the Post Office from the torch.


The British weren't the only ones starting fires in Washington. The Americans were too. Soon after the redcoats arrived, everything at the Navy Yard -- buildings, ships stores, even ships that were being built for the US Navy -- went up in flames to prevent them from falling into British hands.


Then Mother Nature took a hand. A violent thunderstorm on the night of August 24 followed by a tornado the next day finished the grisly work. By the time the British marched out of Washington on the evening of August 25, the city was in ruins."

www.exploredc.org/index.php?id=340
Link Posted: 9/12/2004 2:06:52 PM EST
No, but I will probably listen to Johnny Cash "The Battle of New Orleans"
Link Posted: 9/12/2004 2:49:21 PM EST
A Canadian will tell you we lost.
Link Posted: 9/12/2004 2:54:20 PM EST

Originally Posted By exgi:
A Canadian will tell you we lost.



We won in overtime in New Orleans and Canadians are full of sh*t.
Link Posted: 9/12/2004 2:54:59 PM EST
yes
Link Posted: 9/12/2004 2:55:45 PM EST

Originally Posted By vito113:
You may have beat us in 1776 but payback is a bitch!




Im willing to put money on the U.S. kicking the dogshit out of the Brits again!
Link Posted: 9/12/2004 2:59:01 PM EST
Link Posted: 9/12/2004 3:04:16 PM EST

Originally Posted By GLOCKshooter:
No, but I will probably listen to Johnny Cash "The Battle of New Orleans"




Johnny Cash did not sing that song. It was Johnny Horton.
Link Posted: 9/12/2004 3:05:30 PM EST
Isn't The Patriot with Mel Gibson on TNT tonight as well?

Damnit, it pisses me the hell off that all week there isn't jack shit on tv fit to watch, then they manage to put on two things I want to see on at the same time. Oh well, TNT always does an encore at 11 of whatever they show at 8. Since I'm watching Band of Brothers now, I'll just watch this 1812 stuff and then The Patriot at 11 if they show it again.
Link Posted: 9/12/2004 3:44:18 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/12/2004 3:59:48 PM EST by GLOCKshooter]

Originally Posted By rebel_rifle:

Originally Posted By GLOCKshooter:
No, but I will probably listen to Johnny Cash "The Battle of New Orleans"




Johnny Cash did not sing that song. It was Johnny Horton.



Johnny Cash may not have wrote it, but he damn sure sang it at least once, for I have the MP3.


----------------------
edited to add:

CD Review: America - Johnny Cash - America

The Johnny Cash album, "America," was first released in 1972. In honor of Johnny's 70th birthday, this is one of several albums being re-released by Columbia/Legacy onto CD. Columbia/Legacy is a division of Sony Music. Most of these re-releases have been long out of print, and this is the perfect opportunity to add to your collection or replace worn-out vinyl and cassette material.

This particular album is part dialogue and part song. Johnny himself wrote all the dialogue along with four of the songs. June Carter wrote one of the songs as well. Some songs were released on earlier albums, but were included on this album as well since they fit the patriotic theme of the project. It starts in 1775 with Paul Revere and the birth of our nation. It continues on with dialogue and song to the America of today. Each song is preceded by explanatory dialogue.

It starts out ...

Johnny Cash does a cover of Johnny Horton's "Battle of New Orleans." Johnny lends a different sound to this classic song. His deep bass and the boom-chicka-boom guitar style make it unique but no less enjoyable.
Link Posted: 9/12/2004 3:45:59 PM EST
Come to think of it, lots of people have, including Kingfish, a band that Bob Weir (rythem guitarist for the Grateful Dead) palayed with.
Link Posted: 9/12/2004 3:58:30 PM EST
Thanks for the reminder. It's 8:55 and Im off to watch the War of 1812................. WarDawg
Link Posted: 9/12/2004 3:58:34 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/12/2004 4:00:14 PM EST by innocent_bystander]

Originally Posted By GLOCKshooter:
No, but I will probably listen to Johnny Cash "The Battle of New Orleans"



I think you mean Johnny Horton.



Battle Of New Orleans lyrics

In eighteen-fourteen we took a little trip
Along with Colonel Jackson down the mighty Mississipp'
We took a little bacon and we took a little beans
And we fought the bloody British in the town of New Orleans
We fired our guns and the British kept a comin'
There wasn't nigh as many as there was a while ago
We fired once more and they began to runnin'
On down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico

We looked down the river and we seed the British come
And there must've been a hundred of 'em beatin' on the drum
They stepped so high and made their bugles sing
We stood beside our cotton bails and didn't say a thing
We fired our guns...

Old Hickory said we could take 'em by surprise
If we didn't fire our muskets till we looked 'em in the eyes
We held our fire till we seed their faces well
Then we opened up our squirrel guns and really gave 'em hell
We fired our guns...

Yeah they ran through the briars and they ran through the brambles
And they ran through the bushes where a rabbit couldn't go
They ran so fast that the hounds couldn't catch 'em
On down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico

Well we fired our cannon till the barrel melted down
Then we grabbed an alligator and we fought another round
We filled his head with cannonballs and powdered his behind
And when we touched the powder off the 'gator lost his mind
We fired our guns...
They ran through the briars...

Link Posted: 9/12/2004 4:00:56 PM EST
Look three posts up.
Link Posted: 9/12/2004 4:04:23 PM EST
I saw an interview with Johnny Cash and he said that the accidental death of his friend Johnny Horton lead to his first battle with drug addiction.
Link Posted: 9/12/2004 4:06:43 PM EST
Jimmy Driftwood (1917-1998) was a prolific United States folk songwriter and musician, most famous for his songs The Battle of New Orleans and Tennessee Stud.

James Corbitt Morris, (better known as Jimmie Driftwood or Jimmy Driftwood) was born in Mountain View, Arkansas on 20 June 1907. Driftwood's father was folk singer Neil Morris. Driftwood learned to play guitar at a young age on his grandfather's homemade instrument. Driftwood used the unique guitar throughout his career and noted that its neck was made from a fence rail, its sides from an old ox yoke, and the head and bottom from the headboard of a bed. This homemade instrument produced a pleasant distinctive resonant sound. Driftwood attended John Brown College in northwest Arkansas and later received a degree in education from Arkansas Teacher's College. He started writing songs during his teaching career in order to teach his students history in an entertaining manner.

During the 1920s and 1930s Driftwood left Arkansas and took to the road. Eventually hitchiking his way through the Southwest United States. In Arizona he entered, and won, a local song contest.

In 1936 Driftwood married Cleda Johnson, who was a former student and returned to Arkansas to raise a family and resume his teaching career. During this period of his life Driftwood wrote hundreds of songs but did not pursue a musical career seriously.

He wrote his later famous "Battle of New Orleans" song in 1936 to help get a highschool class he was teaching interested in the subject.

In the 1950s he changed his name to "Jimmy Driftwood" both publicly and legally.

In 1957 a Nashville, Tennessee song publisher heard of Driftwood, auditioned him, and signed him to his first record deal. Driftwood recalled playing some 100 of his songs in one day, of which 20 were select to be recorded. Driftwood's first album Newly Discovered Early American Folk Songs received good reviews but did not sell particularly well.

The Battle of New Orleans, a song he first wrote to get his students interested in the history of that battle, was included on the album but did not fit in the radio standards for airplay at the time because of the words "hell" and "damn" in the lyrics; Driftwood said that at the time those words could be preached but not sang in secular contexts for broadcast. Driftwood was asked to make a shorter censored version of the song for a live radio performance. This was heard by singer Johnny Horton, who contacted Driftwood saying he wished to record his own version of the song.

So, to recap, Jimmy Driftwood wrote it. Johnny Horton made it famous. Johnny Cash did record it on the album America in 1972.
Link Posted: 9/12/2004 4:10:21 PM EST
Yep, watchin' it right now.
Link Posted: 9/12/2004 4:26:53 PM EST
Well, the Battle of New Orleans had no bearing on the rest of the war, since the war had ended when it was fought (but no one was able to tell the combatinants this, so the whole thing went forward anyway)...

The 'interesting' thing about 1812 is that the Birts very well might have won had their lines of communication not been scrambled, and had they not been fighting Napoleon over in Europe...

Basically, they got news of the battle of Lake Champlaign (a US naval victory which turned back a 13,000 man invasion force) before news of the rest of the war, thought they were doing much worse than the then-unknown-to-them 'facts on the ground' indicated, and decided to give up & send their forces to France...

Talk about 'If someone were to take any piece of modern technology back to (this-or-that) war'... The British commanders would have killed for even the simplest trans-continental radeo equipment... Fortunately, it was not invented for over 100 years...
Link Posted: 9/12/2004 4:29:19 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/12/2004 4:29:40 PM EST by ED_P]
Maybe if I watch it I'll finally dig out my half finished model of the USS Constitution and finish it!

Link Posted: 9/12/2004 5:03:24 PM EST

Originally Posted By vito113:
Then Mother Nature took a hand. A violent thunderstorm on the night of August 24 followed by a tornado the next day finished the grisly work. By the time the British marched out of Washington on the evening of August 25, the city was in ruins."
www.exploredc.org/index.php?id=340



Could have been a hurricane and it with the tornado ended up wiping out a lot of the British troops. More than were killed/wounded at Bladensburg.

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