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Posted: 2/12/2013 6:20:47 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/12/2013 6:22:46 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Eric802:
Apparently, a "mini-stroke" is a real medical thing, and not a menu item at a midget massage parlor. Or so I've discovered in the last 48 hours.

Saturday night, I was up in Chicago seeing my kids. We were walking from the car to the hotel when I dropped my keys. Twice. And then had trouble actually getting my right hand to put them in my coat pocket. When we got to the room, I was trying to say a sentence to my daughter with the word "eyes" in it, and I couldn't come up with the word. My brain totally blanked on it. Then, when I finally got the word in my head, it came out "eyers" when I tried to say it. Several times. Even when I told myself "Okay, slow down, say it right", it still came out "eyers". My kids were laughing about it, but the older one (13) was clearly picking up that something wasn't right. Just like that, it passed. Whole thing lasted 3-4 minutes and I was fine.

Pro-tip: Go to the ER when this happens. Don't do what I did.

So I watched tv with the girls for a bit until they went to bed, and then called the wife. I didn't say anything to her because she's in Texas, I'm in Chicago, there's nothing she can do about it, etc. I knew what had happened since I'd already googled it, but I figured I'd call my doc Monday morning.

Pro-tip #2: Tell your wife when something like this happens. Otherwise, when you eventually do get out of the ER, she'll damn near put you right back in it because she's so pissed you didn't tell her.

Sunday I was fine. Got home late Sunday night, went to bed, and told the wife in the morning. She immediately gets on google and calls her best friend, who calls the doc she works for, who says "get your ass to the ER". So we went.

I now know how an Indy car feels when it pulls into the pits. Walking into an exam room at the ER, having told the triage nurse about your stroke symptoms, and having six nurses descend on you like locust is an experience that can shake you up a little. Apparently they take this stuff seriously. Within an hour, I'd had bloodwork, a CT scan, and was being wheeled in for an MRI. All the tests came back fine; when we asked the ER doc what had happened, she confirmed that it was a TIA (transient ischemic attack, or mini-stroke) and said "Your brain and all your blood vessels look fine. Sometimes it's just a vascular thing that happens when you're over 40".

I have to follow up with neurologist tomorrow, but I'm back at work today. Feeling fine but it's kind of strange to realize "Yep, you actually had a little stroke".



In the red you will find the trigger to your stroke. Stay the hell out of Chi-town and you will be healthy with only the natural amount of holes in your body that God gave you.
Link Posted: 2/12/2013 6:24:03 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/12/2013 6:24:11 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/12/2013 6:28:11 AM EDT
Time is not something to waste when you suspect a stroke. Glad you're ok. Might put you at increased risk in the future so pay attention next time.
Link Posted: 2/12/2013 6:31:55 AM EDT
Glad to hear you're OK, OP!













Also, dibs on ur gunns
Link Posted: 2/12/2013 6:33:08 AM EDT
Did they put you on aspirin? Was it your right hand you were dropping the keys from?
Link Posted: 2/12/2013 6:36:48 AM EDT
I had a TIA a couple of years ago. Amnesia for about 6 hours. I have a few vague memories of MRI, dont remember the CAT scan or Xray. But I do remember being pushed around in the wheel chair making like a race car driver! My poor wife probabl thought that she'd have to put up with me like that for 30'years!
Link Posted: 2/12/2013 6:41:40 AM EDT
Had something similar abut a year ago. I was with the wife, though, and she took my butt to the ER.

In my case, I suddenly couldn't put names with things and people. Saw a Cabela's billboard, for example, and while I recognized the script, I had no idea who or what "Cabela's" was. People's names all of a sudden were "wrong" (why are you calling her Sue?, I'd ask. But I didn't know what I thought she should be called.) Weird. No problems since, thank goodness, but I did get a thorough checkup!
Link Posted: 2/12/2013 6:42:33 AM EDT
glad you're ok. please don't watch state of the union tonight
Link Posted: 2/12/2013 6:43:05 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/12/2013 6:43:25 AM EDT
I thought this was a FAP thread.

Glad you're okay.
Link Posted: 2/12/2013 6:43:56 AM EDT
Consider yourself very lucky. My dad had a TIA mid-january. Could not see, and did'nt know who he was. He got his vision back, but not his memory/mental acuity.
Link Posted: 2/12/2013 6:46:43 AM EDT
Happened to me while working in a medical office. Included confusion, visual impairment, and memory loss. The supervisor, a nurse, told me to drive myself home!!! At least I had the sense to call a friend, tell him I was comming over and to check on me if I didn't show up.
Link Posted: 2/12/2013 6:46:57 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Gunner1X:
I thought this was a FAP thread.

Glad you're okay.


I thought a mini stroke was gonna involve a midget.

TRG
Link Posted: 2/12/2013 6:47:48 AM EDT
Holy crap man. That's kind of scarey shit.
Glad you're okay!
Link Posted: 2/12/2013 6:48:27 AM EDT
Get checked out ASAP. Chance of recurrence or a real stroke in the next 6 months is pretty damn high
Link Posted: 2/12/2013 6:49:50 AM EDT
Glad to hear you are ok. My dad had a full on stroke 3 years ago. Scary shit. He was pretty bad off for a month. Then he went on to about a 98% recovery. I say 98% because he said his left arm is a little weak sometimes and his left leg makes him do a pimp style stutter step every now and then. Strokes can be controlled if they are caught in time. Next time get your ass to the ER quick!
Link Posted: 2/12/2013 6:50:46 AM EDT
Keep a check on man. Hope things improve for you.
Link Posted: 2/12/2013 6:53:20 AM EDT
I've had a couple in the last 10 years. The first one I was deaf in my right ear for about 8 weeks. Doc put me on meds and my hearing returned. The second was about 5 years later and I lost the ability to "point my right foot up". Walked around with a floppy foot for about 6 weeks.No meds , it just eventually returned to normal.
Link Posted: 2/12/2013 7:02:10 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Eric802:
Originally Posted By drizzle:
In the red you will find the trigger to your stroke. Stay the hell out of Chi-town and you will be healthy with only the natural amount of holes in your body that God gave you.


Well, I was in the suburbs. And I managed to live up there for 43 years without having a stroke. Maybe it was the shock of the weather.


You're experiencing Texas withdraws.

It will get better when you get home.

Dude, seriously, glad your event was as mild as it was.

TXL
Link Posted: 2/12/2013 1:43:10 PM EDT
TIA is way over diagnosed but I'd say that was most likely. They should do an MRA or CTA or at least a carotid duplex. I'd want an echo as well. They sent you home? I keep my TIAs generally at least over night. It depends on the risk factors though.
Link Posted: 2/12/2013 1:43:39 PM EDT
Originally Posted By NAM:
Consider yourself very lucky. My dad had a TIA mid-january. Could not see, and did'nt know who he was. He got his vision back, but not his memory/mental acuity.


Not a TIA if it didn't completely recover. Wrong diagnosis.
Link Posted: 2/12/2013 1:44:25 PM EDT
Originally Posted By AtomicRooster:
I've had a couple in the last 10 years. The first one I was deaf in my right ear for about 8 weeks. Doc put me on meds and my hearing returned. The second was about 5 years later and I lost the ability to "point my right foot up". Walked around with a floppy foot for about 6 weeks.No meds , it just eventually returned to normal.


Not a TIA in either case. The floppy foot was more likely a peroneal nerve injury or less likely an L5 radiculopathy.
Link Posted: 2/12/2013 1:44:50 PM EDT
Originally Posted By MikefromTX:
Had something similar abut a year ago. I was with the wife, though, and she took my butt to the ER.

In my case, I suddenly couldn't put names with things and people. Saw a Cabela's billboard, for example, and while I recognized the script, I had no idea who or what "Cabela's" was. People's names all of a sudden were "wrong" (why are you calling her Sue?, I'd ask. But I didn't know what I thought she should be called.) Weird. No problems since, thank goodness, but I did get a thorough checkup!


Probably correct diagnosis.
Link Posted: 2/12/2013 1:45:46 PM EDT
Originally Posted By 12a10:
I had a TIA a couple of years ago. Amnesia for about 6 hours. I have a few vague memories of MRI, dont remember the CAT scan or Xray. But I do remember being pushed around in the wheel chair making like a race car driver! My poor wife probabl thought that she'd have to put up with me like that for 30'years!


My shoot from the hip diagnosis is transient global amnesia. It's not true ischemia in the way we think about stroke. Occurs in the hippocampus. Usually gets better and doesn't come back.
Link Posted: 2/12/2013 1:49:11 PM EDT
So, I guess we know who our resident neurologist is now.
Link Posted: 2/12/2013 3:52:04 PM EDT
Originally Posted By clivus:
Originally Posted By 12a10:
I had a TIA a couple of years ago. Amnesia for about 6 hours. I have a few vague memories of MRI, dont remember the CAT scan or Xray. But I do remember being pushed around in the wheel chair making like a race car driver! My poor wife probabl thought that she'd have to put up with me like that for 30'years!


My shoot from the hip diagnosis is transient global amnesia. It's not true ischemia in the way we think about stroke. Occurs in the hippocampus. Usually gets better and doesn't come back.


Did you just call the OP fat?

TRG
Link Posted: 2/12/2013 5:04:08 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/12/2013 5:19:32 PM EDT
Originally Posted By clivus:
Originally Posted By NAM:
Consider yourself very lucky. My dad had a TIA mid-january. Could not see, and did'nt know who he was. He got his vision back, but not his memory/mental acuity.


Not a TIA if it didn't completely recover. Wrong diagnosis.


They originally diagnosed it as TIA... then an "event".... now they're saying stroke. He's been on coumadin for years, and they attributed it to that. New heart valve in Dec 2007, stroke in 2008, Subdural hematoma in Oct 2012, occipital stroke about a month ago.
Link Posted: 2/12/2013 5:24:45 PM EDT
My mother had a series of mini strokes. Listen to your body and don't be a hard headed tough guy.

Glad you re ok.
Link Posted: 2/12/2013 5:29:25 PM EDT
Originally Posted By NAM:
Consider yourself very lucky. My dad had a TIA mid-january. Could not see, and did'nt know who he was. He got his vision back, but not his memory/mental acuity.


I had something simalar ,about 5 years ago

I was singing and could read verses 1&2 , but 3&4 were blurry , went away by the time the song was over,

went to the eye doc the next morning, full exam nothing amiss , called the local DR's office , nobody seemed concerned.

Took me about a month to figure out it probably had a TIA.

Now the lasting effects are, when I'm driving somewhere , it's like looking at a map with a blank space in the middle.

I know where I'm going, and can get there , I just can't picture in my mind the shortest way to get there.

Link Posted: 2/12/2013 5:32:53 PM EDT
I think I may have had a mini stroke when I found out vendors were price gouging on ammo.

Link Posted: 2/12/2013 5:34:06 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/12/2013 5:34:54 PM EDT by mad_mardigan]
Glad to hear your OK. Im almost positive it was you that sold me a Mosin M38 about 2 years ago, we met at the Bolingbrook Bass Pro for a FTF. I remember you mentioned you were moving to TX. Hope you get better
Link Posted: 2/12/2013 5:44:38 PM EDT
Ouchie. Hope all is well.
Link Posted: 2/12/2013 5:51:25 PM EDT
My dad had a couple of those a few years ago. 911 and an ambulance ride. An over night stay at the hospital, which he complained about the whole time, and hes been fine since. My mom watches him like a hawk since. They're both 80.
Link Posted: 2/12/2013 5:53:54 PM EDT
Keep us updated, and good luck.
Link Posted: 2/12/2013 5:55:43 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/12/2013 5:59:51 PM EDT
It's possible that I might have experienced something vaguely like that once or twice, but without any noticeable side effects,
even immediately thereafter.


A couple of times I've been sitting there doing whatever I'm doing and BAM, suddenly I felt like I got hit (painlessly) and I'm dizzy for a few seconds.


It goes away in just seconds and then all is normal again.


When it happens, it's intense enough that if I'm standing, I don't try to move for several seconds. If I'm sitting, I don't try to get up for several seconds.


I've also noted that when I smile, my right upper lip doesn't normally go quite as far up as my left one. Not quite symmetrical. This could be a minor neural issue with
the fifth facial nerve, or it could be just a muscular imbalance borne of a habitual way of smiling.


CJ
Link Posted: 2/12/2013 6:00:11 PM EDT
Sounds like it was somewhere in the left MCA territory. Scary stuff

I'm glad you're OK
Link Posted: 2/12/2013 6:17:03 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/12/2013 6:20:29 PM EDT by 15ladder]
Maybe 10-12 years ago, I'm at my mom's house,cutting the grass, cleaning up the garden,whatever. (She was a diabetic). Later, we're sitting on the front porch waiting for the mailman to show up. I said' " Mom,when does the mail usually get here?" and she said" Nrf flp dpt." Oreely? She had not shown any symptoms until my question. "Uh,Mom, what time does the mail get here?" "Srp nit erf." Alrighty then. " Mom,we're gonna take a ride to the hospital,OK?" She had a small bleed on her brain, Honestly can't remember the treatment, but she recovered from that pretty well. She passed away in '06, from a burst aneurysm in her brain, quickly and quietly as she wanted, having spent 6 years watching my dad fight cancer. OP, I know this won't help you,and I wish you the best in your recovery, but maybe some Arfcommer will remember this post and get a stroke patient to the ER ASAP. Stay well all. ETA Fuck Andrew Cuomo. (sorry,Mom)
Link Posted: 2/12/2013 6:19:48 PM EDT
Glad to hear you recovered.

On the EMS side, I see a lot of patients who decide to lay down and see if things will get better by morning or after they get up from their nap. This is absolutely the wrong thing to do. You should call 911 and go by ambulance to the nearest hospital. The reason I encourage transport by ambulance is because some hospitals will better handle strokes than others. It is imperative that you be transported to a stroke center or the nearest appropriate facility.

If you call me because you think you are having a stroke, I will perform a pre-hospital stroke screening, as well as search for other possible causes for your altered mental status. I will establish an IV and check your blood sugar. I will perform, at a minimum, a 12-lead EKG. You will be placed on oxygen. I will relay my findings to the triage nurse or the emergency physician and they will likely direct me to take you directly to CT when I arrive.

I will consult with your family to choose a hospital. This is probably the most important thing I do on the EMS side. There are six hospitals within 45 minutes. Only two of them are appropriate for a patient experiencing a possible CVA. One has a neurologist at the hospital 24/7. The other has 24/7 access to a neurologist via a robot with skype-like technology (neurologist tells the emergency physician what tests to perform and he then relays the information). If your family simply poured you into the car and drove you to the hospital, you could end up at the wrong one wasting valuable time and killing brain tissue.

Link Posted: 2/12/2013 6:20:37 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/12/2013 6:26:57 PM EDT
Originally Posted By nick89302:
Glad to hear you recovered.

On the EMS side, I see a lot of patients who decide to lay down and see if things will get better by morning or after they get up from their nap. This is absolutely the wrong thing to do. You should call 911 and go by ambulance to the nearest hospital. The reason I encourage transport by ambulance is because some hospitals will better handle strokes than others. It is imperative that you be transported to a stroke center or the nearest appropriate facility.

If you call me because you think you are having a stroke, I will perform a pre-hospital stroke screening, as well as search for other possible causes for your altered mental status. I will establish an IV and check your blood sugar. I will perform, at a minimum, a 12-lead EKG. You will be placed on oxygen. I will relay my findings to the triage nurse or the emergency physician and they will likely direct me to take you directly to CT when I arrive.

I will consult with your family to choose a hospital. This is probably the most important thing I do on the EMS side. There are six hospitals within 45 minutes. Only two of them are appropriate for a patient experiencing a possible CVA. One has a neurologist at the hospital 24/7. The other has 24/7 access to a neurologist via a robot with skype-like technology (neurologist tells the emergency physician what tests to perform and he then relays the information). If your family simply poured you into the car and drove you to the hospital, you could end up at the wrong one wasting valuable time and killing brain tissue.


"And how long have you been having these chest pains?" "Since yesterday afternoon." Gotta love it.
Link Posted: 2/13/2013 5:24:31 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/16/2013 5:50:53 AM EDT
Eric, how did the follow up go? Did anyone mention VAD (vertebral artery dissection) to you? Often this is the cause of strokes in younger people who don't have other risk factors.
Link Posted: 2/16/2013 7:43:42 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/16/2013 8:11:26 AM EDT
Don't let them plug a PFO even if you've got it. There's no evidence closing it reduces your stroke risk more than anti platelet therapy. (Aspirin, plavix, or aggrenox)
Link Posted: 2/16/2013 8:18:24 AM EDT
Nope haven't had one this weekend. But the weekend is not over yet
Link Posted: 2/16/2013 9:25:26 AM EDT
Originally Posted By clivus:
Don't let them plug a PFO even if you've got it. There's no evidence closing it reduces your stroke risk more than anti platelet therapy. (Aspirin, plavix, or aggrenox)


This is my understanding, too. In the case of a cryptogenic stroke (a stroke of unknown cause) this is often the diagnosis of exclusion. I am interested in this thread for personal reasons. I would agree that a medical precaution (one using medicine) would be the preferable alternative to an attempted surgical remedy, which has its own risks.

There was a burst of news a few months ago about the benefits of Lycopene as a stroke preventative. Cheap and pretty safe, you might want to check with your MD and throw it in the mix. 15 - 20 mg/day. Add in some krill oil, magnesium, and CoQ10.

http://www.neurology.org/content/79/15/1540

Link Posted: 2/16/2013 9:31:27 AM EDT
As you've probably already been told, TIA is a good indicator you are at risk for more TIAs or full-blown strokes. Clivus is obviously the subject matter expert here though.
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