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Posted: 8/9/2011 9:44:14 AM EDT
Something heavy I mean, 7,000 to 12,000 GVRW? At work we were cutting some parts that left 81" long drops of 8" channel iron, which I picked up for 0.18 / lb I have enough to build a 13' long by 6' wide trailer frame.
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 11:05:57 AM EDT
I say do it. It's not that hard and you can get trailer parts from a slew of online vendors.

If the max load you want to carry is 12000lbs, I would install 8 lug 7000lb axles. That way you have some wiggle room on weight. I like the Dexter axles. They seem to hold up better IMHO.

I have a purchased trailer that has some other brand of axle and one of them is bent and needs replacing.

Definitely get at least one electric brake axle. IF you are gong to regularly haul heavy, a two brake set up might be better.

Use a 2 5/16ths hitch. I like the Bulldog hitches that actually open like a clamshell. You might consider installing an adjustable height hitch in case you use different tow vehicles.

Up to 14000lbs I wouldn't use a pintle (military) hitch, they can get wiggly on ya. Ask me how I know!

Don't skimp on the tires. Get the most load range you can afford.

I hope this helps and good luck!




Link Posted: 8/9/2011 11:40:25 AM EDT
Originally Posted By demobud:
I say do it. It's not that hard and you can get trailer parts from a slew of online vendors.

If the max load you want to carry is 12000lbs, I would install 8 lug 7000lb axles. That way you have some wiggle room on weight. I like the Dexter axles. They seem to hold up better IMHO.

I have a purchased trailer that has some other brand of axle and one of them is bent and needs replacing.

Definitely get at least one electric brake axle. IF you are gong to regularly haul heavy, a two brake set up might be better.

Use a 2 5/16ths hitch. I like the Bulldog hitches that actually open like a clamshell. You might consider installing an adjustable height hitch in case you use different tow vehicles.

Up to 14000lbs I wouldn't use a pintle (military) hitch, they can get wiggly on ya. Ask me how I know!

Don't skimp on the tires. Get the most load range you can afford.

I hope this helps and good luck!






Basically everything you said is what I plan to do. Except I may use trailer house axles. They're a dime a dozen and usually have springs and brakes.
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 11:43:14 AM EDT
6 foot is not wide enough to hual a car of much size if you are going to build a trailer make it bigger than you think you need you will be ahead in the end.
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 11:45:06 AM EDT
Originally Posted By JosephTurrisi:
6 foot is not wide enough to hual a car of much size if you are going to build a trailer make it bigger than you think you need you will be ahead in the end.


I was approximating. My current trailer is 76" wide between the fenders and too narrow for my purposes. I will make this trailer 81" wide between the fenders, which will haul either of my full size jeeps with large tires.
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 3:09:53 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Kuraki:
Originally Posted By demobud:
I say do it. It's not that hard and you can get trailer parts from a slew of online vendors.

If the max load you want to carry is 12000lbs, I would install 8 lug 7000lb axles. That way you have some wiggle room on weight. I like the Dexter axles. They seem to hold up better IMHO.

I have a purchased trailer that has some other brand of axle and one of them is bent and needs replacing.

Definitely get at least one electric brake axle. IF you are gong to regularly haul heavy, a two brake set up might be better.

Use a 2 5/16ths hitch. I like the Bulldog hitches that actually open like a clamshell. You might consider installing an adjustable height hitch in case you use different tow vehicles.

Up to 14000lbs I wouldn't use a pintle (military) hitch, they can get wiggly on ya. Ask me how I know!

Don't skimp on the tires. Get the most load range you can afford.

I hope this helps and good luck!






Basically everything you said is what I plan to do. Except I may use trailer house axles. They're a dime a dozen and usually have springs and brakes.



I have mobile home axles under one I built 17 years ago, they seem to hold up fine if you put good tires (not the homemaster specials) on them and pack the wheel bearings regularly. The axle tubes are thin so you can't have the spring perches too far inboard of the tires or you will bend them. The downfall is that stupid 14.5" wheel diameter, but good rubber and a spare or two make that not too much of an issue.

Also, try to find ones with the bigger inner bearings, that's what I have. Some have the same size bearings on both sides of the hub. I'm not sure what the weight ratings are for either kind, but bigger seems better here.

And wire it like you life depends on it, double wall shrink tube, solder, well routed, bombproof grounds. It costs a little more and takes extra time, but it pays off in the long run.
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 5:29:01 PM EDT
If you designing it, I would suggest a deck over trailer. No fenders are a big plus!
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 5:34:29 PM EDT
Check your locality to see if they will let you use house trailer axles. ( I have used them on several builds....but it is my understanding that on a home built....they won't put a inspection sticker on it in my AO.)

8" channel by what?...11.5.....this thing could be insanely heavy from the get go.

Agreed on go as big as you can.....you will always want to haul something bigger.

post pics....
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 5:37:12 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Kuraki:
Originally Posted By demobud:
I say do it. It's not that hard and you can get trailer parts from a slew of online vendors.

If the max load you want to carry is 12000lbs, I would install 8 lug 7000lb axles. That way you have some wiggle room on weight. I like the Dexter axles. They seem to hold up better IMHO.

I have a purchased trailer that has some other brand of axle and one of them is bent and needs replacing.

Definitely get at least one electric brake axle. IF you are gong to regularly haul heavy, a two brake set up might be better.

Use a 2 5/16ths hitch. I like the Bulldog hitches that actually open like a clamshell. You might consider installing an adjustable height hitch in case you use different tow vehicles.

Up to 14000lbs I wouldn't use a pintle (military) hitch, they can get wiggly on ya. Ask me how I know!

Don't skimp on the tires. Get the most load range you can afford.

I hope this helps and good luck!






Basically everything you said is what I plan to do. Except I may use trailer house axles. They're a dime a dozen and usually have springs and brakes.


They may be a dime a dozen but wait until you buy a few DOT appoved 14.5 inch tires they aren't cheap. One thing that you can do is change out the hubs to use a reg. 15 or 16 inch wheels in a number of bolt patterns
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 6:58:41 PM EDT
I was hoping the hubs could be swapped out.
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 8:05:31 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Kuraki:
I was hoping the hubs could be swapped out.


You can get the hubs from northern tool you just need to know what size bearings your axles use
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 8:09:28 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Kuraki:
I was hoping the hubs could be swapped out.


Another thing to think about is the fact that the single leaf moble home springs are junk you should buy a good set of springs in the rating you nedd
Link Posted: 8/12/2011 2:14:50 PM EDT
If you poke around pirate4x4.com you will find lots of info on building a trailer.
Link Posted: 8/12/2011 6:43:19 PM EDT
IIRC anything rated 3k lbs and up has to have brakes. Not an expert, just remember that for some reason. Don't know why you would want to tow 10K+ without them in fairness
Link Posted: 8/12/2011 6:49:55 PM EDT
Ive built many trailers.
I would stay away from the mobile home axles.
Hubs may not interchange with other axles.
The old saying on ARFCOM, buy once, cry once. Get yourself a good set of axles whether sprung or torsion
and bypass the headache you may have down the road.

Link Posted: 8/13/2011 7:49:10 PM EDT
Another vote against mobile home axles, they don't last. Dexter axles are durable plus they have good parts availability although most have standard bearings.

If you go with surge brakes, using DOT 5 brake fluid will save you plenty of headaches since the fluid won't absorb water vapor. I would rather swap out electric brake magnets than overhaul wheel cylinders any day. Plus you don't have to lock out the hitch when backing up although they do make electric lock-outs.

You need a good welder plus experience. FCAW all the way, unless you rock SMAW. You have a lot of welding with that, FCAW dual shield lays a great weld without much of the spatter, short wires and trouble with GMAW (solid wire +75/25 Ar/CO2). Most dual shield is pretty much self-cleaning as the slag peels off.

On springs, go with eye-eye and equalizers. Slippers and brakes scare me.
Link Posted: 8/13/2011 9:21:21 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/13/2011 9:32:52 PM EDT by sst04]
My trailer has House Trailer axles, I changed them out to 6 lug from Northern tool. Found some wheels off of a Toyota 4 Runner.

ETA, I would have to disagree about the House trailer Axles not lasting, unless they have changed in the past 20 years. My trailer was given to me by my FIL, it was homebuilt years ago and used to have 3 mobile home axles. They use to use it to haul a TD9-B dozer. So, including the years and years of abuse he put it through, plus what I have put it through, I would have to say they last pretty well.
Link Posted: 8/13/2011 10:01:20 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Keith_J:
Another vote against mobile home axles, they don't last. Dexter axles are durable plus they have good parts availability although most have standard bearings.

If you go with surge brakes, using DOT 5 brake fluid will save you plenty of headaches since the fluid won't absorb water vapor. I would rather swap out electric brake magnets than overhaul wheel cylinders any day. Plus you don't have to lock out the hitch when backing up although they do make electric lock-outs.

You need a good welder plus experience. FCAW all the way, unless you rock SMAW. You have a lot of welding with that, FCAW dual shield lays a great weld without much of the spatter, short wires and trouble with GMAW (solid wire +75/25 Ar/CO2). Most dual shield is pretty much self-cleaning as the slag peels off.

On springs, go with eye-eye and equalizers. Slippers and brakes scare me.
GMAW all the way. Forget FCAW.


Link Posted: 8/14/2011 11:48:57 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/14/2011 7:17:24 PM EDT by Kuraki]
I weld and machine structural items that go into this:



and this:



and this:




Welding won't be an issue.

I think I will take your combined advice against trailer house axles and wait to buy a nice setup. I'm in no hurry.
Link Posted: 8/14/2011 12:24:22 PM EDT
I like the combine trax.
You can most always get repair parts for the "name brand" axles. Parts for mobile home
axles may give you fits.

Have fun building the trailer and get us some pictures when you get rolling.
Link Posted: 8/14/2011 7:15:45 PM EDT
Originally Posted By VRMN8R:
I like the combine trax.
You can most always get repair parts for the "name brand" axles. Parts for mobile home
axles may give you fits.


Have fun building the trailer and get us some pictures when you get rolling.


I'm thinking that's worth the price itself in the long run.


You wouldn't believe how many of those have been built over the last couple years. I don't know where they're all going, but when construction died, ag seemed to double.
Link Posted: 8/14/2011 7:32:02 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Kuraki:
Originally Posted By VRMN8R:
I like the combine trax.
You can most always get repair parts for the "name brand" axles. Parts for mobile home
axles may give you fits.


Have fun building the trailer and get us some pictures when you get rolling.


I'm thinking that's worth the price itself in the long run.


You wouldn't believe how many of those have been built over the last couple years. I don't know where they're all going, but when construction died, ag seemed to double.

Trailers? We have an oil boom here in Texas. Every swinging Richard is pulling a trailer loaded heavily. And I've seen trailers stacked three deep towed behind trucks heading down to the fields.

The drilling isn't the issue, it is the pressure treating "iron" which are ball-jointed lengths of 2" HEAVY WALLED pipe. The joints are assembled with a hammer to tighten the threads. The joints are 4 feet long, just light enough to be somewhat easily handled. But they use TONS of it, connecting hundreds of pieces to manifolding which then goes into the coiled tubing unit to hydraulically fracture the formations.

That and everything else to make oil affordable. Be glad you are making money. Also, same story in the Bakken field, North Dakota and Montana.
Link Posted: 8/14/2011 7:43:56 PM EDT
No, I meant the tracked combines. We've been making a lot of parts for them. But I believe you - the real energy sector has kept a lot of manufacturing alive the last few years. Trust me, I'm grateful for the business that's gotten us through, which has been Ag and Defense, but now even construction.

That's why I can't understand the doom and gloom over the economy. Everyone is so focused on the consumer side. We are looking at almost doubling our total sales this year, for heavy construction, agricultural, locomotive, parts. I don't mean double our recession sales. I mean double our highest level of annual sales. I suppose part of it is a lot of OEMs went under, but, it's hard to believe enough in our line of work did to cause that.
Link Posted: 8/14/2011 7:53:43 PM EDT
My dad built a trailer when I was still in grade school. It has a trailer house axle underneath it, and we haven't been able to kill it. Now my brother has it.
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