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Posted: 9/7/2004 9:30:51 PM EST
I know most gun stores, and Dunhams is one, have an "All sales are final" disclaimer, but I impulse bought a gun and it's seriously messed up and I haven't even fired it yet. Wondered if they were cool about exchanges & the like before I wasted an hour's drive to find out. The receipt says they honor manufacturer's warranties against defective merchandise, so I'm wondering....

Anyone tried it and had any luck?
Link Posted: 9/7/2004 10:47:58 PM EST
If it's new and was sold as new, they ought to be pretty good about exchanging or making things right. And even if they say No Returns, No expressed or implied warrantees of fitness or merchantibility, most states have consumer protection laws that support a limited Guarantee of Merchantibility. In other words even if you waive the warrantee on a new item sold as new, it is supposed to work as designed, it might not work for what you want ("Fitness") just works (merchantability). You should probably get satisfaction. Might not but you should. Buyers Remorse won't do, but a bad product should.

Now if it was sold as Used, As-Is, and you didn't check it out thoroughly and find the problem that was obvious, then shame on you (and maybe them for ripping you off), or if just buyers remorse and they let you know about the problem, well you are probably stuck It may help if you offer to pay for their time and paperwork costs. up front
Link Posted: 9/7/2004 10:51:49 PM EST
I don't know if the company would let you exchange, but they could charge you a restocking fee, which could be pretty expensive. I believe Bushmaster restocking fee is something like 10% of the selling price excluding shipping which they don't refund.
Link Posted: 9/7/2004 11:14:38 PM EST

Originally Posted By PaDanby:
If it's new and was sold as new, they ought to be pretty good about exchanging or making things right. And even if they say No Returns, No expressed or implied warrantees of fitness or merchantibility, most states have consumer protection laws that support a limited Guarantee of Merchantibility. In other words even if you waive the warrantee on a new item sold as new, it is supposed to work as designed, it might not work for what you want ("Fitness") just works (merchantability). You should probably get satisfaction. Might not but you should. Buyers Remorse won't do, but a bad product should.

Now if it was sold as Used, As-Is, and you didn't check it out thoroughly and find the problem that was obvious, then shame on you (and maybe them for ripping you off), or if just buyers remorse and they let you know about the problem, well you are probably stuck It may help if you offer to pay for their time and paperwork costs. up front



Thanks for the info. It was a new gun, sold as new, but had some serious machining defects on the inner workings. So much so, in fact, that it's inoperable. I'd think that would cover "bad product". We'll see, I'll try taking it back tomorrow. Worst part is, it was a gift for my step father and I feel like a douche for not looking it over better before presenting it.
Link Posted: 9/7/2004 11:26:18 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/7/2004 11:31:43 PM EST by Nugz]
I would ASSUME that if it has not been fired or abused by you in any way and it was purchased rather recently that Dunhams would exchange it for another off the rack. That is purely an assumption on my part as my dealings (non-firearm) with the Dunhams in my area have always been exceptional.

Backstory:My wife and I decided to give paintball a try a couple of years ago and bought two paintball markers and some other related gear at Dunhams. I questioned the prices on the markers as they were quite a bit higher than internet prices elsewhere. Without blinking an eye the guy tells me he will take 20% off of the markers which were labeled at MSRP and then tells me he would give me the $45 Mask/Goggles I was holding for $20. I ended up spending alot less than I would have by ordering from the big dogs on the net.

I guess what I am getting at is that it never hurts to ask. The worst they can do is say "no", right? They stated that they will stand behind the manufacturers warranty on the receipt so I would go for it. The least they can do for you is get it repaired by the manufacturer and an hours drive is probably better than a broken gun any day. Good luck.

-Nugz

ETA: Lol, you posted after I started writing. Machining defects? Inoperable? Hell yeah, go for it. There is no excuse for that.



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