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Posted: 12/14/2013 1:33:56 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/14/2013 1:35:21 PM EST by leib109]
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=321208350443

I used a die from CNC Warrior (made in Poland, I believe) to thread an AK barrel a few weeks ago and it was a cinch. Would one of these hold up to threading a barrel? I'm concerned that the teeth might not last.
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 1:36:54 PM EST
If I'm threading to use a suppressor, I always let a professional do it
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 1:41:35 PM EST
That just grips onto the outside of the barrel and starts cutting as you crank it on, but there is nothing that keeps it concentric to the barrel, so you could get baffle / end strikes pretty easily with that...
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 1:42:07 PM EST
I'm sure it would hold up to doing a barrel, but the trick is doing it straight if you are threading by hand.
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 1:42:16 PM EST
While I've threaded many things in my heavy equipment mechanic career, that is something I would feel more comfortable having a pro with CNC or lathe do.
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 1:43:23 PM EST
I also have an alignment tool for it from CNC Warrior.
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 1:45:51 PM EST
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 1:45:56 PM EST
As a cnc machinist in firearms industry who routinely threads barrels for suppressor use I can highly recommend you don't do this for a can.
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 1:46:06 PM EST
OST.

Link Posted: 12/14/2013 1:50:21 PM EST
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 1:51:08 PM EST
I'm not intending on ever suppressing the weapon, it just needs to accept a flash hider. When I did it on the AK it worked perfectly- no bullet strikes on the slant muzzle brake. I agree that if I was going to suppress the weapon it would be best to take it to a machinist, but that isn't necessary in this case.
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 1:52:50 PM EST
Didn't a lot of Eastern Bloc-designed suppressor use overlarge bores to allow for shitty barrel threading, including "field-expedient" jobs done with hand tools?

I'm pretty sure I remember reading that in one of Paulson's books.
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 2:14:53 PM EST
External thread dies are easy to use, and also easy to wreck shit with.

The small allen screw is used for adjusting the threadform slightly. Cut some threads on a steel rod first see how the item you want to mount fits, then adjust if needed.
Use lots of oil for lubricant when cutting.

The metal that die is made from -should- be pretty damn tough, but treat it like a file and avoid dropping it, etc.
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 2:27:34 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Meplat:
External thread dies are easy to use, and also easy to wreck shit with.

The small allen screw is used for adjusting the threadform slightly. Cut some threads on a steel rod first see how the item you want to mount fits, then adjust if needed.
Use lots of oil for lubricant when cutting.

The metal that die is made from -should- be pretty damn tough, but treat it like a file and avoid dropping it, etc.
View Quote


That's a good idea. I'll go ahead and see if I can find a suitable rod.
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 2:35:46 PM EST
FPNI
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 2:37:04 PM EST
I'm curious how you're going to reduce the OD from .7" to .497" for threading. By hand.

Gonna Dremel that shit?
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 2:40:57 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Fidel:
As a cnc machinist in firearms industry who routinely threads barrels for suppressor use I can highly recommend you don't do this for a can.
View Quote


Yup I would have to agree, cans are expensive as is replacing a barrel or the weapon if something tragic happened due to a strike in the can or even a flash suppressor. This is a task best left to the PROs.
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 3:41:50 PM EST
Some guys will do anything to save a buck.



Good luck, OP.
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 4:01:08 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/14/2013 4:02:54 PM EST by dletsch]
I have used similar devices, with alignment tools, to thread a .22, a 5.45x39 AK, and a 7.62x39 AK. They all worked fine. The .22 and 5.45 have been fired through cans without baffle strikes.

In all 3 cases the guns were made during the ban (the .22 was a .22lr AR upper) and had barrels already turned to appropriate ODs.

They work OK. Its still a better idea to have it professionally done.
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 4:07:22 PM EST
I would be worried about the description saying "Import"

If it is Chinese then I would not buy it. My experience with Chinese drill bits, taps, and dies is they are a crap shoot at best. I have seen everything from soft steel, brittle steel, and some way out of spec threads. Some drill bits were undersized, some oversized, etc.
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 4:12:15 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By substandard:
I would be worried about the description saying "Import"

If it is Chinese then I would not buy it. My experience with Chinese drill bits, taps, and dies is they are a crap shoot at best. I have seen everything from soft steel, brittle steel, and some way out of spec threads. Some drill bits were undersized, some oversized, etc.
View Quote



Polish is not Chinese.

Not that origin of manufacture is some kind of guarantee. Alot of Chinese made stuff is pretty good these days. Alot is still crap.
There is a brand of lathe chucks made in Poland... it's on the tip of my tongue but I can't recall it. Anyways, they're supposed to be top notch.
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 4:16:13 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By DeltaElite777:
Didn't a lot of Eastern Bloc-designed suppressor use overlarge bores to allow for shitty barrel threading, including "field-expedient" jobs done with hand tools?

I'm pretty sure I remember reading that in one of Paulson's books.
View Quote


I assumed they threaded them with hand tools. Google Izhmash pictures today, they are still very manual, lots of hammering and filing.
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 4:18:55 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/14/2013 4:21:07 PM EST by substandard]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By 1Andy2:



Polish is not Chinese.


Not that origin of manufacture is some kind of guarantee. Alot of Chinese made stuff is pretty good these days. Alot is still crap.
There is a brand of lathe chucks made in Poland... it's on the tip of my tongue but I can't recall it. Anyways, they're supposed to be top notch.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By 1Andy2:
Originally Posted By substandard:
I would be worried about the description saying "Import"

If it is Chinese then I would not buy it. My experience with Chinese drill bits, taps, and dies is they are a crap shoot at best. I have seen everything from soft steel, brittle steel, and some way out of spec threads. Some drill bits were undersized, some oversized, etc.



Polish is not Chinese.


Not that origin of manufacture is some kind of guarantee. Alot of Chinese made stuff is pretty good these days. Alot is still crap.
There is a brand of lathe chucks made in Poland... it's on the tip of my tongue but I can't recall it. Anyways, they're supposed to be top notch.

Agreed. However in "Item Specifics" it lists the die as a product of China. ETA: I just re-read the OP and saw the mention of Polish dies. I was referring to the die in the Ebay add he linked to.

I went with good quality tooling from USA, Europe, and Japan. The Chinese stuff is still a crap shoot IMHO

Bison is Polish, and it is a very good brand
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 5:08:07 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/14/2013 5:17:11 PM EST by USPcompact]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By 1Andy2:



Polish is not Chinese.

Not that origin of manufacture is some kind of guarantee. Alot of Chinese made stuff is pretty good these days. Alot is still crap.
There is a brand of lathe chucks made in Poland... it's on the tip of my tongue but I can't recall it. Anyways, they're supposed to be top notch.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By 1Andy2:
Originally Posted By substandard:
I would be worried about the description saying "Import"

If it is Chinese then I would not buy it. My experience with Chinese drill bits, taps, and dies is they are a crap shoot at best. I have seen everything from soft steel, brittle steel, and some way out of spec threads. Some drill bits were undersized, some oversized, etc.



Polish is not Chinese.

Not that origin of manufacture is some kind of guarantee. Alot of Chinese made stuff is pretty good these days. Alot is still crap.
There is a brand of lathe chucks made in Poland... it's on the tip of my tongue but I can't recall it. Anyways, they're supposed to be top notch.


Bison.

A lot of Toolmex stuff is also Polish, and it's pretty damn good, too.

ETA: Phase II is Chinese, and it's pretty solid. I typically stay away from the Chicom tools and buy used USA/Japan/Germany, but I've been pleased with their stuff.
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 5:08:56 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By ziarifleman:
I'm curious how you're going to reduce the OD from .7" to .497" for threading. By hand.
View Quote

^This^ Gotta be the right OD to do the task.
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 6:18:24 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By substandard:
I would be worried about the description saying "Import"

If it is Chinese then I would not buy it. My experience with Chinese drill bits, taps, and dies is they are a crap shoot at best. I have seen everything from soft steel, brittle steel, and some way out of spec threads. Some drill bits were undersized, some oversized, etc.
View Quote


This is what I was referring to. I'm leery of the origin of the die, and I've heard mixed things about the quality of Chinese tools. I'm just going to thread it on a practice rod and see if it's in spec, and if not I'll upgrade to a better die.
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 6:21:55 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By USPcompact:


Bison.

A lot of Toolmex stuff is also Polish, and it's pretty damn good, too.

ETA: Phase II is Chinese, and it's pretty solid. I typically stay away from the Chicom tools and buy used USA/Japan/Germany, but I've been pleased with their stuff.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By USPcompact:
Originally Posted By 1Andy2:
Originally Posted By substandard:
I would be worried about the description saying "Import"

If it is Chinese then I would not buy it. My experience with Chinese drill bits, taps, and dies is they are a crap shoot at best. I have seen everything from soft steel, brittle steel, and some way out of spec threads. Some drill bits were undersized, some oversized, etc.



Polish is not Chinese.

Not that origin of manufacture is some kind of guarantee. Alot of Chinese made stuff is pretty good these days. Alot is still crap.
There is a brand of lathe chucks made in Poland... it's on the tip of my tongue but I can't recall it. Anyways, they're supposed to be top notch.


Bison.

A lot of Toolmex stuff is also Polish, and it's pretty damn good, too.

ETA: Phase II is Chinese, and it's pretty solid. I typically stay away from the Chicom tools and buy used USA/Japan/Germany, but I've been pleased with their stuff.


Got a Phase II "Aloris" type toolpost (wedge type) set for my Atlas earlier this year.
Yeah, Bison is what I was thinking of.
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 6:26:24 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By leib109:
I'm not intending on ever suppressing the weapon, it just needs to accept a flash hider. When I did it on the AK it worked perfectly- no bullet strikes on the slant muzzle brake. I agree that if I was going to suppress the weapon it would be best to take it to a machinist, but that isn't necessary in this case.
View Quote


No it didn't. Are you looking for validation? If so, you have chosen a poor method of "threading a barrel". It is awesome to save a buck, but you can just send the thing to tornado or yhm and have it done right for $50 instead of being obtuse and cheap. Your money, your bbl, but I think you are just looking for validation.
Link Posted: 12/15/2013 5:01:56 AM EST
[Last Edit: 12/15/2013 5:02:45 AM EST by leib109]
Delete
Link Posted: 12/15/2013 6:35:00 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By 1Andy2:


Got a Phase II "Aloris" type toolpost (wedge type) set for my Atlas earlier this year.
Yeah, Bison is what I was thinking of.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By 1Andy2:
Originally Posted By USPcompact:
Originally Posted By 1Andy2:
Originally Posted By substandard:
I would be worried about the description saying "Import"

If it is Chinese then I would not buy it. My experience with Chinese drill bits, taps, and dies is they are a crap shoot at best. I have seen everything from soft steel, brittle steel, and some way out of spec threads. Some drill bits were undersized, some oversized, etc.



Polish is not Chinese.

Not that origin of manufacture is some kind of guarantee. Alot of Chinese made stuff is pretty good these days. Alot is still crap.
There is a brand of lathe chucks made in Poland... it's on the tip of my tongue but I can't recall it. Anyways, they're supposed to be top notch.


Bison.

A lot of Toolmex stuff is also Polish, and it's pretty damn good, too.

ETA: Phase II is Chinese, and it's pretty solid. I typically stay away from the Chicom tools and buy used USA/Japan/Germany, but I've been pleased with their stuff.


Got a Phase II "Aloris" type toolpost (wedge type) set for my Atlas earlier this year.
Yeah, Bison is what I was thinking of.


To take this further off-topic - the $10 toolholders from CDCO are excellent for the price. Not as nice as an Aloris, Dorian, or even a Phase2, but they're $10. I bought a dozen and replaced the 8mm set screws with ones from Unbrako that have a dog point. I bought the cheapest Unbako set screws I could find and then chucked them up on the mill in an 8mm ER collet and turned the dog point by holding the lathe cutting tool in a vise.


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