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Posted: 8/25/2006 5:23:45 PM EDT
I just put an M1 carbine on lay-away. I did some research on it and found a website that according to the serial number  is an Inland made by GM.  They made more than 2 Mil of them. I know the Winchesters bring the premium prices but do you know anything about the Inland rifles?  This one is completely refinished and has a polished bolt. Who ever did this work, did a good job. I paid $329 plus tax. Any input from other owners would be appreciated.  Thanks.
Link Posted: 8/25/2006 5:26:00 PM EDT
[#1]
If it is in good working order, you did well.  I would have the bolt parkerized so it looks correct.
Link Posted: 8/25/2006 5:32:56 PM EDT
[#2]
Thief!

Just before Perry this year I got hit for $545 + tax for an Inland Korean return and felt glad to get it.

Of course, i could have held out but I was in a hurry.

BTW it's a pretty good shooter.
Link Posted: 8/25/2006 5:33:14 PM EDT
[#3]
The fact that it's refinished with a pimped polished bolt probably explains why you got such a good price.  $329 is a steal for a G.I. carbine.  More Inlands were made than any other make, so they're generally the least desireable for collectors.  Great gun, a blast to shoot.  Everyone should have one.
Link Posted: 8/25/2006 5:37:57 PM EDT
[#4]
Nice find.
Link Posted: 8/25/2006 5:46:25 PM EDT
[#5]
You can't go wrong with Audie Murphy's fav.
Link Posted: 8/25/2006 5:55:05 PM EDT
[#6]
Link Posted: 8/25/2006 5:56:08 PM EDT
[#7]
Good For You!  its the original PDW and still avalid platform in that context. wish i still had both of mine.
Link Posted: 8/25/2006 5:59:07 PM EDT
[#8]
A friend of mine picked up a IBM for ~$350 it is in beautiful shape. I told him what a lucky bastard he is. He had no idea of what it could have cost him.
Link Posted: 8/25/2006 6:08:07 PM EDT
[#9]
My Dad has two, not sure what make they are, but they are fun little rifles to shoot.
Link Posted: 8/25/2006 6:08:20 PM EDT
[#10]
I got a pristine National Postal Meter in 1970 (when I was 18) for $95.00, couldn't afford the Winchester for $115.00.

Still have the little darling too!

I'd like to get one I don't have to worry about wearing out. Who makes new ones that are high quality? Are those IMIs (?) any good?
Link Posted: 8/25/2006 6:19:10 PM EDT
[#11]
I have a Saginaw Gear rifle bought from another Missouri member.

Still another Ar15.com member from Missouri has two, one of which is with Berlin Police marks - I don't recall the maker of either of these rifles.

They are a blast to shoot.  I'm hoping to find an M-4 bayonet and oiler tomorrow at the funshow, and maybe pick up a stock if I find one that is cheap enough and less ragged than the one I have.
Link Posted: 8/25/2006 6:26:00 PM EDT
[#12]

 Here is my Inland. It is a DCM gun from way back. It is in great shape and a deadly weapon. I showed my wife how to use it like a pistol. Two to the chest one to the head. She looked at me and said "Did you pull the trigger every time?". It's an easy gun to use.

Link Posted: 8/25/2006 6:28:21 PM EDT
[#13]
Are the new-made ones from Auto Ordanace any good?
Link Posted: 8/25/2006 6:33:11 PM EDT
[#14]
I have a Rock-Ola carbine that my father-in-law gave me. I've never shot it - I don't think he did either. I keep it on display - great conversation piece.
Link Posted: 8/25/2006 6:38:41 PM EDT
[#15]
Here's my IBM that I traded a guy for in the EE. It didn't look this good when I got it though:


Link Posted: 8/25/2006 6:48:00 PM EDT
[#16]

Quoted:
Are the new-made ones from Auto Ordanace any good?


The Auto Ordnance example I have shot is fine, although not as accurate as my own rifle.
Link Posted: 8/25/2006 6:51:49 PM EDT
[#17]
I have an Iver Johnson and I love it, plus its compatible with GI parts unlike the Universal.

I have heard good things about the Khar/Auto Ordnance ones too
Link Posted: 8/26/2006 3:20:26 AM EDT
[#18]
Congratulations on joining the Carbine fraternity.   Be warned, they create addiction.  You will be owning a true piece of very useful history.  

Something to check before you refinish that bolt, especially if you are new to Carbines - I have seen a special Inland that was a verified presentation piece to a GM Executive, something like a production award for no. X00,000.  I don't remember the number range, but it had a highly polished bolt and a a few other nice touches.  If by any chance that is the case with the one you have on lay-away, you will be able to buy several with what you've got in it.  Alternatively it may be just be one of the many that were lovingly personalized back in the 50's, 60's, & 70s after being brought back in a seabag or footlocker.  

You can get up to speed on the Carbine by visiting sites like jouster.com, surplusrifles.com, warrifles.com, and, gunboards.com.  If you want to understand its history better, try to find "Shots Fired in Anger" by Lt. Col. John George, "To Hell and Back" by Audie Murphy and also read many of the Medal of Honor citations available online for later in WW II, Korea, and the early Vietnam years.

A Carbine in good working order is a very deadly weapon within 200 yards.  You will hear talk that the anything less than 30'06 is some kind of BB, the record does not bear this out.  The Carbine was popular not just with our troops but was used by British Forces in Burma and Malaya, also Australian and Canadian troops (when they could get their hands on them).  It well filled a certain niche and IMHO was superior to submachine guns due to superior range and accuracy.  

Again, welcome to the Club and enjoy getting to know the "light, handy, and accurate" (per John George)  M-1 Carbine - a weapon of the everyday American and Allied heroes living amongst us.
Link Posted: 8/26/2006 1:29:15 PM EDT
[#19]
I have an Inland that I bought a few years ago. It was manufactured in 1943 and is a fine rifle.
Link Posted: 8/26/2006 2:21:23 PM EDT
[#20]
You got yourself a good deal on your M1. I have two Inlands and a Plainfield. I shoot the Plainfield to keep the miles off the GIs. All three are good shooters.
Link Posted: 8/26/2006 2:26:58 PM EDT
[#21]
Here's my IBM, sorry about the fluff, it was posed in last night's din-pic.  It's an early-run flip up sight w/suicide safety, a real gem.


Link Posted: 8/26/2006 2:35:45 PM EDT
[#22]
M1 Carbine Pron

Quality Hardware AAP Arsenal Rebuild











All Original Inland Paratrooper











Link Posted: 8/26/2006 3:21:26 PM EDT
[#23]
Like I said above, I have an IJ w/ no complaints but one of these days I WILL have a Saginaw mafe GI Carbine
Link Posted: 8/26/2006 3:27:02 PM EDT
[#24]
I had a Rock Ola that was my constant companion as a teenager.


WHY, LORD, OH, WHY DID YOU LET ME SELL IT!!!!
Link Posted: 8/26/2006 9:56:09 PM EDT
[#25]
height=8
Quoted:
Congratulations on joining the Carbine fraternity.   Be warned, they create addiction.  You will be owning a true piece of very useful history.  

Something to check before you refinish that bolt, especially if you are new to Carbines - I have seen a special Inland that was a verified presentation piece to a GM Executive, something like a production award for no. X00,000.  I don't remember the number range, but it had a highly polished bolt and a a few other nice touches.  If by any chance that is the case with the one you have on lay-away, you will be able to buy several with what you've got in it.  Alternatively it may be just be one of the many that were lovingly personalized back in the 50's, 60's, & 70s after being brought back in a seabag or footlocker.  

You can get up to speed on the Carbine by visiting sites like jouster.com, surplusrifles.com, warrifles.com, and, gunboards.com.  If you want to understand its history better, try to find "Shots Fired in Anger" by Lt. Col. John George, "To Hell and Back" by Audie Murphy and also read many of the Medal of Honor citations available online for later in WW II, Korea, and the early Vietnam years.

A Carbine in good working order is a very deadly weapon within 200 yards.  You will hear talk that the anything less than 30'06 is some kind of BB, the record does not bear this out.  The Carbine was popular not just with our troops but was used by British Forces in Burma and Malaya, also Australian and Canadian troops (when they could get their hands on them).  It well filled a certain niche and IMHO was superior to submachine guns due to superior range and accuracy.  

Again, welcome to the Club and enjoy getting to know the "light, handy, and accurate" (per John George)  M-1 Carbine - a weapon of the everyday American and Allied heroes living amongst us.


Carbines get undeserved bad press IMO.
I have a few and they are addicting.
In addition to what was said above the Germans liked them too.
There were certain rewards for capturing them for reverse engineering and Nazi officers and NCOs liked them better than their own vaunte MP's.
You stole it for $350.
Link Posted: 8/27/2006 8:32:48 AM EDT
[#26]
$329 is a great price for a GI Carbine, but please get the bolt blued or parked so it doesn't look like a pimp gun.

I have two.  The one of the left is a Rock-Ola and on the right is an Underwood in a repro M1A1 folding stock:



They are reliable and fun to shoot.  They run good with Remington JSPs which is an effective defense load.  
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