Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
PSA
Member Login

Posted: 5/21/2005 6:47:35 AM EDT
These things rarely ever come up for sale and I need some quick info.  Are the leases usually renewed? Does the annual lease price increase each time?  What happens if the lease isn't renewed?
Anything else I should know? Thanks in advance
Link Posted: 5/21/2005 7:50:44 AM EDT
My family had a cabin inside a National *Park* for years. The Park system is quite different from the Forest system though. Parks are administered through the Dept. of the Interior and the National Forest system is administered through the Dept. of Agriculture. You might want to start there, at the Dept. of Agriculture web site. There is also a group of people that call themselves "inholders" that have these leases inside the National Forests. You might want to Google "inholders" and see what comes up. I know that they used to publish a magazine and probably still do.

We bought our cabin in 1978 and the lease was set to expire in 1993. The lease had been renewed two times before, but we had no preconceived notions that it would be renewed in 1993. It was not and we lost the lease and cabin. We did not pay much for the cabin as market value was pretty low considering the situation. The National Forest system is different and renewals are not that difficult from what I understand.

Good luck.
Link Posted: 5/21/2005 8:15:25 AM EDT
My BIL & nephew had a cabin on the Pine river in the Manistee National Forest.  It was on a 10 year lease.  They renewed it twice.  The third time the NFS declined to renew.  The cabin was razed!  I don't know all of the details but congressmen couldn't even help.  This was during the Clinton administration.  The Grand Rapids Press and Detroit Free Press published some extensive articles about it to no avail.  Regardless of the improvements and pressure, the NFS called it in.  This was at the time when the Sierra Club type groups were closing off public access to public land.
A search of those papers during that time period should find the articles.

This makes it a very risky deal!
Link Posted: 5/21/2005 8:18:03 AM EDT
In a couple places here in the Santa Fe National Forest, near Pecos andJemez Springs;  the Forest Service deeded the land over to the leaseholders. Seems like they wanted to get out of  the leasing business.
Link Posted: 5/22/2005 6:16:38 AM EDT
Thanks folks.  There are 3 years left of a 20 year lease on this one.  I figure that if they renew it just one time that my kids (us too) would have a great time during some important years.  Nice land is in high demand near Yellowstone and big money folks or families who have held it for generations own most of it. It is an $85,000 risk though.  I have heard they have to buy the cabin from you or you can remove it if the lease doesn't get renewed.  This from the owner..
I love Pecos NM.  We have some great memories of hiking and camping in that area!  
Link Posted: 5/22/2005 7:15:45 AM EDT
Another factor in lease renewal you have to take into account is politics. That is what sunk our cabin. At one time the lease could have been renewed, but due to some of the other cabin owners not wanting to "make waves" they waited until the last minute. The problem was the "other side" (the Sierra Club) had been preparing for our demise for years. As it ended up, at the time of the end of the lease the other side had a more freindly administration than we did.

My advice is to get chummy with the other cabin owners in the area and unite and make it a common cause. You can Google "inholders" with the area the cabin is in and you can just out a lot on what is going on.
Link Posted: 5/22/2005 11:05:04 AM EDT
You better research this. Start with the following article;;
http://www.thenewamerican.com/tna/2001/01-29-2001/vo17no03_rewilded.htm


Good luck,
Link Posted: 5/22/2005 11:18:24 AM EDT

Originally Posted By livefree:
Thanks folks.  There are 3 years left of a 20 year lease on this one.  I figure that if they renew it just one time that my kids (us too) would have a great time during some important years.  Nice land is in high demand near Yellowstone and big money folks or families who have held it for generations own most of it. It is an $85,000 risk though.  I have heard they have to buy the cabin from you or you can remove it if the lease doesn't get renewed.  This from the owner..
I love Pecos NM.  We have some great memories of hiking and camping in that area!  



That is too much college fund money to risk it. Have you priced the cost of moving the house, or the market rate for relocated housing in NC?

85K in NC, where you don't own a lot. That is just plain nuts and the seller is just looking for one of those suckers born every minute. Don't be his.
Link Posted: 5/22/2005 1:56:41 PM EDT
NC is a very expensive state to buy a house.  To me anyway.  The average house cost is about $225k.
However this cabin is near Yellowstone in WY. People in the area say that the billionaires are pushing the millionaires out of Jackson Hole.  The millionaires are moving to Cody which is 30 miles north of the cabin.  Whoever gets this one will not be a sucker, but a lucky fucker.  I'm just doing my homework right now. I'd post pics but don't have time to learn the process today.  


Originally Posted By stator:
[That is too much college fund money to risk it. Have you priced the cost of moving the house, or the market rate for relocated housing in NC?

85K in NC, where you don't own a lot. That is just plain nuts and the seller is just looking for one of those suckers born every minute. Don't be his.

Link Posted: 5/22/2005 2:05:52 PM EDT
Originally Posted By ARSTAF:
You better research this. Start with the following article;;
http://www.thenewamerican.com/tna/2001/01-29-2001/vo17no03_rewilded.htm


Wow, some quotes from that site:

It was on this basis that the Clinton administration invited UNESCO to intervene to declare Yellowstone a World Heritage Site in danger. Yellowstone Park superintendent Mike Finley also deferred to the supposed sovereignty of the UN over the park by maintaining that the World Heritage treaty, despite the lack of federal implementing legislation, has "the force and statutory authority of federal law."



It must be remembered, however, that the objective of the UN-created Wildlands Project is not to restore the land, but rather to control it. The UN plainly stated this socialist premise in the report of its 1976 Conference on Human Settlements in Vancouver: "Land, because of its unique nature and the crucial role it plays in human settlements, cannot be treated as an ordinary asset, controlled by individuals and subject to the pressures and inefficiencies of the market." But property rights are the literal, material foundation of all liberties; a government that controls the land will control the people thereupon. Through the Wildlands Project and subsidiary efforts such as Y2Y, the Power Elite that controls the UN is, quite literally, seizing control of the land upon which Americans live.
Top Top