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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/22/2005 12:10:46 AM EDT
I just started to listen to a few Bluegrass/Folk music songs.

Man, some of these songs you can't listen to when you're drinking, otherwise you might end up shooting yourself because you feel so sorry for yourself.

Right now I am listening to "Down In The Willow Garden", an old folk song.
"Down in the willow garden
Where me and my love did meet
There we sat a courtin'
My love dropped off to sleep
I drank a bottle of burgundy wine
My love she did not know
And there I poisoned that dear little girl
Under the flank below
I stabbed her with my dagger
An ugly bloody knife
I threw her into the river
An ugly bloody sight
My father up and told me
That money would set me free
If I would murder thar deal little girl
Whose name was Rose Connelly
And now he sits by the window
Wiping his tear-dimmed eyes
And now he waits for his own dear son
Upon the scaffold high
My race is run, beneath the sun
Hell is waiting for me
For I did murder that dear little girl
Whose name was Rose Connelly"

And alternative bands thought they had the market on depressing songs.
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 12:28:24 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/22/2005 12:28:44 AM EDT by prk]
"On the Banks of the Ohio" is not exactly Bluegrass, but sorta depressing. But there's another "killed her down by the river" song that's far worse. I'll have to see if I can dredge it up at the next jam or two.

"I am a Man of Constant Sorrow" isn't very uplifting, though I like it a lot.

"Long Black Veil" is from another age, when guys had this silly idea of dying for a cheating woman. And if the guy was THAT heroic, why did he betray his best friend?
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 3:25:57 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 3:26:33 AM EDT
It's what I call real country music.
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 3:33:25 AM EDT
My wife grew up in the mountains of VA, Appalachia 100%.
Her dad plays banjo with Ralph Stanley when he stops by the house. I like Bluegrass alot, but it can get old. The festivals are a freaking blast.
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 4:01:12 AM EDT


Bluegrass.........Kicks Ass!



I want a t shirt with that on it.



Link Posted: 9/22/2005 4:11:23 AM EDT


Link Posted: 9/22/2005 4:16:59 AM EDT
dueling banjos count?


a buddy jud got a DVD of the dude that did "Edmund Fitzgearld" Cant remember his name (no, not my friends...)

is that Folk?

Time has not been nice to him....


Link Posted: 9/22/2005 4:25:55 AM EDT
my wife is from SE KY, she grew up on that Bluegrass Music.

They were hillbillies for sure. Its great stuff and makes great dancin music

Essayons
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 4:28:41 AM EDT
My dad is a bluegrass musician and I grew up in an RV going from festival to festival. The best thing about bluegrass is that so many of the people who listen to it are also musicians. Some of the best music I heard was never on stage but in the informal pickings that coalesced in the parking lots outside. Then again, the main acts were always wandering around and picking with whoever was good enough to hang with them so I suppose that contributed.


Find the Carl Jackson CD "Spring Training" and listen to "Lonesome Dove." That song made me cry before I was old enough to understand what the words meant.
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 4:34:27 AM EDT
I spent the first 30 years of my life listening to mostly classical music. I only listened to pop/rock when it was on the radio or if I were in a public place.

In the past 5 years, I have been hooked, absolutely hooked on....

Well, it started with hearing Nickel Creek on Prarie Home Companion (I have since stopped listening to GK/PHC becaue GK lost his mind).

Since then I have been obsessed with Chris Thile, Edgar Meyer, Mark Oconnor, Bela Fleck and anything those guys touch.

Collaborations with Joshua Bell, YoYo Ma, Alison Krauss, Jerry Douglass, Bryan Sutton and the like are simply spell binding.

(My other interests are Pat Metheny, Chick Corea, Keith Jarret, etc...)


I highlt recomment these selections for your introduction to "higher" folk music:

"Thirty Year Retrospective" Mark Oconnor (w/ Thile, Sutton, Byron House)

"Short Trip Home" Joshua Bell, Edgar Meyer, Sam Bush, Mike Marshall

"Into the Cauldron" Thile and Mike Marshall, both on Mandolin

"Not all Who Wander are Lost" Chris Thile (w/ Meyer,House,Sutton,Fleck,Jerry Douglass- all the usual suspects)
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 4:41:50 AM EDT
Lets all sing along....Kumbaya...come on now...kumbaya
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 4:43:36 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Slacker:
My wife grew up in the mountains of VA, Appalachia 100%.
Her dad plays banjo with Ralph Stanley when he stops by the house. I like Bluegrass alot, but it can get old. The festivals are a freaking blast.



Ralph Stanly hangs out at your in-laws? Freakin awesome!!!

I see him and the Clinch Mountain Boys everytime they come around.
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 4:43:59 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Cleatus:
dueling banjos count?


a buddy jud got a DVD of the dude that did "Edmund Fitzgearld" Cant remember his name (no, not my friends...)

is that Folk?

Time has not been nice to him....





Gordon Lightfoot. He's Canadian FWIW
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 5:09:13 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/26/2005 11:07:21 AM EDT by CamperDad]
I listen to bluegrass all the time (play guitar and banjo, too).

Some of my personal favorites that aren't in everyones list (like Dueling Banjos, Foggy Mountain Breakdown, and Man of Constant Sorrow):

Walls of Time Ricky Skaggs' version
High on a Mountain Del McCoury
Where the Wild River Runs Hot Rize
Colleen Malone Hot Rize
In the Gravelyard Blue Highway
Whiskey 'fore Breakfast Mike Cross
Togary Mountain Nitty Gritty Dirt Band
Me and John and Paul The Grascals
Moundsville Pen IIIrd Tyme Out

try them out, you might like some/all of them.

- CD

Also, get a Sirius sattelite radio and tune to channel 37 -- all bluegrass all the time.

PS: If you like great banjo picking, I highly recommend the Team Flathead CD - only $13 shipping included...www.huberbanjos.com/c_team_flathead.htm
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 12:07:44 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Cleatus:

a buddy jud got a DVD of the dude that did "Edmund Fitzgearld" Cant remember his name (no, not my friends...)



Google is your friend...
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 12:09:20 PM EDT
Anyone know WTF I can download a good MP3 of Ander Krenshaw (I think it's him) version of "On the Bayou"?
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 12:14:15 PM EDT
what is the web address for google.com again?
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 12:32:05 PM EDT
I love Bluegrass. My neighbor is a banjo picker that was in a Bluegrass band of some fame. They were called "New Liberty". He was even interviewed on the Today Show once. He's played with all the Bluegrass greats at one time or another. It's really a lot of fun to go hear him and his new band play from time to time. He even offered to teach my daughter to play when she gets old enough. Good stuff.
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 12:33:03 PM EDT
LOVE bluegrass music, Bill Monroe is terrific, Jerry Garcia was part of a bluegrass band named Old and in the Way, did some fantastic music with David Grisman.
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 12:54:03 PM EDT
you ain't gonna find anymore soulful music then great mountain bluegrass, or as it's called " that high lonesome sound". alot of bill monroes early recordings when flatt and scruggs and mac wiseman were in his group really display that high lonesome sound. just listen to some of jim and jesse's [mcreynolds] early recordings and the absolutely intricate mandolin pickin that'll make your jaw drop!!! hearing a good banjo player pick " home sweet home" will most certainly bring tears to your eyes. doyle lawson and quicksilver are the epitome of tight harmoney and/or accapella singing in bluegrass gospel music. so many of the early singers and performers couldn't read or write due to the isolated areas in which they lived or having to drop out of school early to help on the farm. but to see them play and hear them sing only proves the addage that " a lack of sophistication doesn't neccessarily mean a lack of intelligence."
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 1:26:49 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/22/2005 1:27:58 PM EDT by Combatvet]
He's got a real pretty mouth on him, don't he?
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 5:56:40 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/24/2005 3:47:31 AM EDT by prk]
DOH!!
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 5:57:15 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/22/2005 5:57:55 PM EDT by prk]

Originally Posted By Cleatus:
what is the web address for google.com again?





Link Posted: 9/22/2005 6:15:03 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Slacker:
My wife grew up in the mountains of VA, Appalachia 100%.
Her dad plays banjo with Ralph Stanley when he stops by the house. I like Bluegrass alot, but it can get old. The festivals are a freaking blast.



One day back in 1991 when I was still attending Va Tech, the wind was blowing the perfect direction, and the air was as warm as one could hope for during April, so I blew off classes and left BlacksBurg for a day of high mountain windsurfing on Clatyor lake. Generally, it is a really bad place to go, but I was really eager to sail after the winter, and this wind direction was the best possible one for the lake sailing. I got to the state park, and a bluegrass festival was ongoing. Well, since it was a state park, and it wasn't a private event, I decided I'd go anyway. I rigged my stuff, and tried to be as low profile as one could be wearing a black neoprene suit carrying brighly colored windsurfing gear. I walked the long route around the edged of the festival to get to the waters edge, and slid in (water was much colder than I expected, dangerously cold) off the bank.

When taking breaks, I stayed down by some brush by the waters edge, again trying not to be viewed as a party crasher. However, the kids would always wander my directions and start asking questions. When I finished, stayed by on the lake bank letting my stuff dry, and some adults started coming up to me, and we chatted. The music, while not my style, was creating quite a stir, and people were dancing all over the place.

Some of these people were plucked straight out of the hills, and I'm quite sure they tell a tale of the day when a 'wind sailing surfer boy' showed up at their festival all dressed in 'rubbah'. The strory might sound far fetched to whomever they are telling it to, but it's quite true...
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