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Posted: 1/29/2011 6:34:08 PM EDT
I'm clueless. Found by a friend while hunting arrowheads in north-central Louisiana:
Link Posted: 1/29/2011 6:37:23 PM EDT
Chupacabras.
Link Posted: 1/29/2011 6:38:06 PM EDT
THAT is about as cool as it gets!
Link Posted: 1/29/2011 6:38:45 PM EDT
I'm not sure what that belongs to, but from reading historical geography, the area you are referring to was mostly underwater during the era that produced any fossils.
Link Posted: 1/29/2011 6:39:17 PM EDT
Looks like the top of an armadillo's head.
Link Posted: 1/29/2011 6:39:19 PM EDT
I'm gonna guess part of something's mouth. ???
Teeth?
Very strange; cool find.
Link Posted: 1/29/2011 6:39:49 PM EDT
Dikfer?
Link Posted: 1/29/2011 6:40:14 PM EDT
Looks like a crushing plate ( upper pallet ) of a fish.
Link Posted: 1/29/2011 6:41:12 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/29/2011 6:47:20 PM EDT by Sturmgewehr-58]
Doesn't look fossilized to me.

Looks like just a dried up jaw bone.
http://www.fossil-treasures-of-florida.com/black-drum.html
Link Posted: 1/29/2011 6:41:20 PM EDT
Originally Posted By 583:
Looks like a crushing plate ( upper pallet ) of a fish.


Yeah, I was thinking it was probably off something aquatic.
Link Posted: 1/30/2011 7:56:50 AM EDT
Ok, someone from LSU advised friend that it was the jawbone of a prehistoric stingray. Pretty neat find.....
Link Posted: 1/30/2011 8:00:00 AM EDT
Originally Posted By OleWild:
Ok, someone from LSU advised friend that it was the jawbone of a prehistoric stingray. Pretty neat find.....


I was actually just about to suggest something like that. Nice find.

I don't know how good the land in LA is for finding fossils, but every time I go there (born in NO, have family in the Baton Rouge area) I barely see any rocks at all, so that makes it pretty cool to find something like that.
Link Posted: 1/30/2011 8:07:49 AM EDT
I have no idea what it is other than to say an orthodontist's dream!
Link Posted: 1/30/2011 8:07:59 AM EDT
Originally Posted By MagKnightX:
Originally Posted By OleWild:
Ok, someone from LSU advised friend that it was the jawbone of a prehistoric stingray. Pretty neat find.....


I was actually just about to suggest something like that. Nice find.

I don't know how good the land in LA is for finding fossils, but every time I go there (born in NO, have family in the Baton Rouge area) I barely see any rocks at all, so that makes it pretty cool to find something like that.


The area it was found in is very hilly and there are lots of rock formations in the hills. I ride through them all the time and have found large formations of "rattle" rocks that are really cool. However, I've never found any fossils or bones - although I do look for them.
Link Posted: 1/30/2011 8:08:52 AM EDT
Cool find.

No arrowheads?
Link Posted: 1/30/2011 8:19:40 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Windustsearch:
Cool find.

No arrowheads?


Yeah, arrowheads are all over the place if you know where to look. Years ago I found what appeared to be the area of an old Indian village on the Ouachita River...pottery pieces with designs and arrowheads everywhere. Unfortunately, the area was in a farmers cotton field and had been plowed up for years and years breaking up all the pottery pieces. However, you can still find pottery bits and pieces with designs in them and arrowheads very easily.
Link Posted: 1/30/2011 8:25:19 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/30/2011 8:26:36 AM EDT by Troubl3shooter]
Fossils aren't real...



ETA: Why isn't the smiley showing up?
Link Posted: 1/30/2011 8:26:30 AM EDT
Originally Posted By FatCat1:
Dikfer?


Is that kinda like a henway?
Link Posted: 1/30/2011 8:37:29 AM EDT
Originally Posted By sel366:
Originally Posted By FatCat1:
Dikfer?


Is that kinda like a henway?


No, the dikfers are seen within a relatively narrow range (about 460-450 MYA) in the Ordovician only, while the henways and their relatives are first seen in the late Devonian, about 365 MYA, and seem to have died out in the Permian-Triassic extinction. Some hypothesize that the henways are descended from the dikfers but I don't think the fossil evidence bears that out.
Link Posted: 1/30/2011 8:42:12 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/30/2011 8:42:44 AM EDT by Lorax]
Possumsaurus Rex
Link Posted: 1/30/2011 8:43:45 AM EDT
Originally Posted By OleWild:
Originally Posted By Windustsearch:
Cool find.

No arrowheads?


Yeah, arrowheads are all over the place if you know where to look. Years ago I found what appeared to be the area of an old Indian village on the Ouachita River...pottery pieces with designs and arrowheads everywhere. Unfortunately, the area was in a farmers cotton field and had been plowed up for years and years breaking up all the pottery pieces. However, you can still find pottery bits and pieces with designs in them and arrowheads very easily.


I love looking for stuff like that. Any pictures of other things that you found?
Link Posted: 1/30/2011 12:43:23 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/30/2011 12:44:07 PM EDT by TxSgt1911]
Originally Posted By MagKnightX:
Originally Posted By sel366:
Originally Posted By FatCat1:
Dikfer?


Is that kinda like a henway?


No, the dikfers are seen within a relatively narrow range (about 460-450 MYA) in the Ordovician only, while the henways and their relatives are first seen in the late Devonian, about 365 MYA, and seem to have died out in the Permian-Triassic extinction. Some hypothesize that the henways are descended from the dikfers but I don't think the fossil evidence bears that out.


Henways evolved from a branch of the Dikfers, reaching an evolutionary dead end and becoming extinct in the late-Permian/early Triassic. The closest parallel is seen in the Giant Assfer, found only in the upper-Cretaceous deposits of West Texas. The fossil record does seem to indicate that the Henway is a direct ancestor of the Piecost.
Link Posted: 1/30/2011 12:52:12 PM EDT
Hard palate?
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