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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 8/13/2005 11:15:50 PM EDT
I am a 20 year old male about 6'2" 245 pounds. And for me this is unacceptable. For the past few years I've just about been confined to my house. I rarely (and i do mean rarely) go outside. Only to take the trash out and let the dogs do there business and hit up the gun range every now and then. I am a computer programmer and for the past few years I have had a cronic ingroan toenail. I have had surgery on it and it came back. Not your average ingroan toenail I had to cut out the side of the nail often with a pocket knife and surgical clamps. It has finaly healed enough for me to run comfortably. But anyway its time for me to get seriouse about getting back into shape.


About a month ago a friend came over (who is in very good shape) and we went on a jog it was 2 miles long. We had to stop a few times for me to get some water and catch my breath but by the time I got back I was literally ready to vomit I was dizzy and soaked but I had the energy to carry on. The next few days my body just about locked up because I didnt continue stretching/exercising.

My days of sitting in my room staring at black and white unix screens has really set me back. My room gets very poor air conditioning so I am thirsty often and sadly I got addicted to soda. I can go through a 12 pack in 2 days. A few months ago I cut my soda intake in half but starting monday I am replacing it with water and exercise. I'm going to start a 2 week trial to see what exactly my pace should be. Going to start off with 3 hours on the treadmill about 80 crunchs 30 pushups some jumping jacks and maybe a bit of weight lifting per day. Diet wise I am thinking of ramen and some subway (just like jared!). I have the energy to do this and I know i need to do it when I am young.

I was a martial artist for 5 years and even for a fat man I consider myself pretty limber. But if you have ever seen a fat man do a split it is not a pretty sight. So I would appreciate any advice or tips you can give me. I do consider this "extreme exercise" since its a real drastic change from my day to day activities. So please any advice would be helpful I am not a dietition so keep it simple if you would.
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 12:42:42 AM EDT
Don;t run. Walk really fast.


Eat well. If you don;t know what "well" is than see a dietition. They can help you BIGTIME!

Fat loss is all in the diet. It has to be good. See a pro.
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 1:11:26 AM EDT

Originally Posted By FredM:
Eat well. If you don;t know what "well" is than see a dietition. They can help you BIGTIME!

Fat loss is all in the diet. It has to be good. See a pro.



+100000000000!

I am (was?) in a similiar place to where you are, DiamondsTip. I work IT, long hours sitting at the computer. I drank huge mugs of coffee with gobs of cream and sugar all day long. Add to it all, I smoked like mad, and I had virtually zero physical activity.

When I decided to start getting back in shape, the first thing to change was my diet, cutting out what we all plainly know is not good for us (soda, lots of sugar, half and half, pizza every day, that sort of thing.) Nothing really fancy. If I wanted a pizza, I made one instead of ordering out. Coffee got a little non dairy creamer and some splenda instead of cream and sugar. Coke was replaced by Diet Coke. Little stuff like that. I started to loose weight just by doing that. Not much, mind you, but that got me motivated to start exercising and really have a look at my diet.

I don't do 'Atkins' or anything like that, though that works wonders for some. I just eat balanced meals, using common sense and erring on the side of less sugar. Combined with a now strenuous cardio program, I've lost 18 pounds in 2 1/2 months. (268 to 250). And the best part is, once you have your diet and workout routine down, and you start seeing results, you WANT to eat right. It's not torture anymore. You will WANT to exercise hard, and you'll feel restless if you don't get to hit elliptical trainer or treadmill ;)

Losing weight is a long-term commitment, but DAMN is it nice to need to buy a size smaller pants
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 2:44:24 AM EDT
I hear you. I smoke too but only on occasion if I chain smoked my fine cigars id have a lot more problems like keeping my house. I really need to stick with this because I've been thinking of pursueing a different career specificaly USMC. My aunt recently had open heart surgery and they gave her a little diet sheet and I was looking over it and kind of took some examples from that. But god no salt has got to be hell on earth. I've been a meat and bread guy since I was a kid. Sometimes eating 2 steaks for dinner and nothing else I just get cravings for a nice juicy steak covered in jack daniels grilling sauce. A BMI calculator pretty much has me at borderline obese but my build doesnt show my fat for some reason. People have always called me big but never fat. Is a dietition really neccessary? My diet other then soda hasnt been that bad. I dont eat a lot but I have a drinking problem and I dont mean alcohol. A lot of people tell me if I just run daily itll just melt off.
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 10:13:00 AM EDT

Originally Posted By DiamondsTip:
I hear you. I smoke too but only on occasion if I chain smoked my fine cigars id have a lot more problems like keeping my house. I really need to stick with this because I've been thinking of pursueing a different career specificaly USMC. My aunt recently had open heart surgery and they gave her a little diet sheet and I was looking over it and kind of took some examples from that. But god no salt has got to be hell on earth. I've been a meat and bread guy since I was a kid. Sometimes eating 2 steaks for dinner and nothing else I just get cravings for a nice juicy steak covered in jack daniels grilling sauce. A BMI calculator pretty much has me at borderline obese but my build doesnt show my fat for some reason. People have always called me big but never fat. Is a dietition really neccessary? My diet other then soda hasnt been that bad. I dont eat a lot but I have a drinking problem and I dont mean alcohol. A lot of people tell me if I just run daily itll just melt off.

'

Don;t follow a heart disease diet. Go see a dietition. If you cannot afford it then just cut out the bad stuff, get rid of the first 10-20 pounds then go see one. We were not taught nutrition in school. These people can melt fat off of you.

Also like i said before, Walk don;t run.
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 10:34:12 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/14/2005 10:35:03 AM EDT by TREETOP]
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 10:54:02 AM EDT
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 10:58:50 AM EDT
tag
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 11:05:15 AM EDT

Originally Posted By TREETOP:
There are two parts to a very simple equation: How many calories taken in, and how many calories burned. By modifying either part of the equation, or preferably both, weight can be changed.

Just changing your soda intake to water will make a huge difference over time.





This is true. The only truth. But your body is extremely complicated and types of macronutirents and timing of when you eat them will make a huge difference.

Like I said the first 10-20 pounds will be easy as pie (OK pie is not easy) but after that it WILL get harder. So see a pro.
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 11:17:19 AM EDT
I would really recommend a diet similar to The South Beach Diet since your a meat and bread man. You can eat carbs on this diet but they're controlled substantially. The diet was designed by one of the leading cardiologists and is well respected.

Next Walking is a great idea. You can achieve the same amount of aerobic benefit from walking as running and its a lot better on your body. I would also recommend weight baring exercises.

A rule of thumb is that it takes 1 day per 10 years old you are to get in shape. So if I wanted to climb Mt. Adams I could achieve the physical capabilities in 4 days if my mental faculties kept up with me.

So push yourself but listen to your body. Drink lots of water. When ever you're hungry first drink a glass of water and then think about what you need to eat.

Best of luck to you, Patty
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 11:32:00 AM EDT
Sounds like you understand that a diet is not something you just do to lose weight but that general lifestyle changes must be made to stay where you want to be. This is good.
Don't try to lose it all at once by running and such,you will likely get some type of injury and be back on your ass feeling sorry for yourself. Walking is great,easy on the joints and such and while it doesn't burn as many calories and more rugged exercise it still gives you the most importaint benifit which is to raise your metabelism (I can't spell worth a shit sorry) .
Soda is bad stuff, try to get off it or reduce it,most of the diet gurus claim diet soda is no good for you either.
Don't lose faith in yourself,you will likely lose a bit in the begining , and then the rate of loss will flatline-keep with the program,it is the longrun which counts , not the day to day or week to week .
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 11:32:25 AM EDT

Originally Posted By pattymcn:
I would really recommend a diet similar to The South Beach Diet since your a meat and bread man. You can eat carbs on this diet but they're controlled substantially. The diet was designed by one of the leading cardiologists and is well respected.

Next Walking is a great idea. You can achieve the same amount of aerobic benefit from walking as running and its a lot better on your body. I would also recommend weight baring exercises.

A rule of thumb is that it takes 1 day per 10 years old you are to get in shape. So if I wanted to climb Mt. Adams I could achieve the physical capabilities in 4 days if my mental faculties kept up with me.

So push yourself but listen to your body. Drink lots of water. When ever you're hungry first drink a glass of water and then think about what you need to eat.

Best of luck to you, Patty



The only problem with SBD is when you are done with the weightloss then you will go back to normal eating and then back to your old weight. Carb restriction is not a long term solution.
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 1:12:31 PM EDT

Originally Posted By FredM:

Originally Posted By pattymcn:
I would really recommend a diet similar to The South Beach Diet since your a meat and bread man. You can eat carbs on this diet but they're controlled substantially. The diet was designed by one of the leading cardiologists and is well respected.

Next Walking is a great idea. You can achieve the same amount of aerobic benefit from walking as running and its a lot better on your body. I would also recommend weight baring exercises.

A rule of thumb is that it takes 1 day per 10 years old you are to get in shape. So if I wanted to climb Mt. Adams I could achieve the physical capabilities in 4 days if my mental faculties kept up with me.

So push yourself but listen to your body. Drink lots of water. When ever you're hungry first drink a glass of water and then think about what you need to eat.

Best of luck to you, Patty



The only problem with SBD is when you are done with the weightloss then you will go back to normal eating and then back to your old weight. Carb restriction is not a long term solution.



Uhh, says, who?
I did this diet, then modified what I eat from then on. I restrict the amount of carbs I take in, specifically the amount of refined sugar that is in my diet. Doing this, you can maintain your weight. Going through the "aggrevation" of doing a diet, then going back to what you were doing befire is just stupid. Don't you agree? After all, what you were doing before got you fat. This is what is called lifestyle modification.



OK, I think that 3 hours of cardio is asking for a coronary. I think something along the line of 20-30 minutes would be fine to start with. Then, if you feel like it, follow it up with some bodyweight calesthenics. The only thing beginning with 3 hours of cardio will get you is a nice looking tombstone.
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 1:29:58 PM EDT
I agree, I've been doing a modified diet based on the number of and types of carbs I eat for the past 7 years and am perfectly healthy [knock on wood]. My diet is healthy, its non restrictive and easy to maintain. I allow myself occassional desserts and higher carb foods but over all eat a very balanced diet.

Patty
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 3:55:53 PM EDT
So you guys think carb restriction is a long term solution?


If you like it thats fine. I find carbs to be a very important part of my diet. They give me the energy required to play sports and lift weights.

If you can do it thats fine. Its not for me though
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 4:10:41 PM EDT
Advice: (a quote) "You know that feeling you get when you are hungry? Get used to it."

///needs to shed a few meself!
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 4:35:16 PM EDT

Originally Posted By FredM:
So you guys think carb restriction is a long term solution?


If you like it thats fine. I find carbs to be a very important part of my diet. They give me the energy required to play sports and lift weights.

If you can do it thats fine. Its not for me though



I restr5ict myself from low complex carbs, not complex carbs such as fruits and vegitables and certain breads and cereals. I wouldn't eat a white hamburger bun but rather pick a whole wheat one or none at all. I do not eat lots of cakes or cookies but will splurg occassionally [a few times a week]. I eat lots of fruits and vegitables daily. My breads are high complex breads.

Patty
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 4:48:39 PM EDT

Originally Posted By pattymcn:

Originally Posted By FredM:
So you guys think carb restriction is a long term solution?


If you like it thats fine. I find carbs to be a very important part of my diet. They give me the energy required to play sports and lift weights.

If you can do it thats fine. Its not for me though



I restr5ict myself from low complex carbs, not complex carbs such as fruits and vegitables and certain breads and cereals. I wouldn't eat a white hamburger bun but rather pick a whole wheat one or none at all. I do not eat lots of cakes or cookies but will splurg occassionally [a few times a week]. I eat lots of fruits and vegitables daily. My breads are high complex breads.

Patty


Fruit is not complex. Fructose.
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 6:02:59 PM EDT
Please go see a doctor, before you start your exercise program.
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 9:15:55 PM EDT

Originally Posted By FredM:

Originally Posted By pattymcn:

Originally Posted By FredM:
So you guys think carb restriction is a long term solution?


If you like it thats fine. I find carbs to be a very important part of my diet. They give me the energy required to play sports and lift weights.

If you can do it thats fine. Its not for me though



I restr5ict myself from low complex carbs, not complex carbs such as fruits and vegitables and certain breads and cereals. I wouldn't eat a white hamburger bun but rather pick a whole wheat one or none at all. I do not eat lots of cakes or cookies but will splurg occassionally [a few times a week]. I eat lots of fruits and vegitables daily. My breads are high complex breads.

Patty


Fruit is not complex. Fructose.



They're a higher complexity than processed sugars or say pastas. I do eat fruit in moderation too.

Patty
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 11:58:02 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/15/2005 12:01:50 AM EDT by Sixgun357]
I think your best bet is seeing a doctor. First they will give you a look over, then reccomend a Diet. I say start walking easy. Take the dog for a walk, its fun and pets have a way of cheering up and increasing morale. But dont start and crash diet or exercise plan till you talk to your doctor.

Until you see your doctor, No junk food, try an apple or banana, Slow down your soda, try Gatorade or powerade cut in half with water if you like a sweet drink. and easy walks around the block. Lay off the mayo on the burgers and sandwiches, try a salad for lunch. and NO deep fried food.

Changing you weight is changing your lifestyle, it does not happen over night. As your diet get better and your exercise increases, things will get easier. You will want to eat better becuase the exercise gets better than you feel better. Set a goal and work towards it everyday.

I just reread your post, 3 hours on the treadmill is very very much, start with 10 or 15 minutes see how you feel. Next day try adding two minutes, maybe increasing the speed by .1 mph. but you already are heading in the right direction. stick with it and let us know how you do.
Link Posted: 8/15/2005 12:18:35 AM EDT
I'm tempted to start this thread off by saying "get real".
I'm 6 feet tall and weigh 300 pounds. 245 pounds is NOTHING. Hell 345 wouldnt be bad. I can put on my boots, grab an 50 pound pack and a rifle and go camping for a couple of days. To tell you the truth I'd LOVE to be able to run one mile and not wish I was dead. I can hike all day and not have a problem but running sucks. Am I out of shape? yes. Is that because I'm overweight? partially. Can you let it affect you? NO BIG HELL NO. I've lost weight on Atkins and exercise. They do work. The suggestions of diet being the biggest factor are dead on. I'd say with the SMALL even TINY amount of extra weight your carrying then hit the gym hard with a personal trainer. With the proper motivation (good personal trainers handle that too) you can turn what you have into a pretty good physique. Good example, my brother is 5'10 and weighs 220 and has only about %6 body fat. You have a great opportunity in front of you. Don't worry about the damn culture that has made you feel bad for what you are. They are wrong. I do believe that stats show over half of this country is technically overweight. Fuck the skinny people lol.

To answer your original question, SBD and Atkins both work. If I were you though, I'd hit Atkins (lo carb, hi protein. Easiest way to explain it is, NO BREAD NO PASTA very light on the veggies. and All the Chicken, cheese, fish, red meat, eggs, and stuff like that you want) hard as hell and hit the gym harder.
Link Posted: 8/15/2005 2:29:55 AM EDT
Link Posted: 8/15/2005 8:25:22 AM EDT

Originally Posted By FredM:
So you guys think carb restriction is a long term solution?


If you like it thats fine. I find carbs to be a very important part of my diet. They give me the energy required to play sports and lift weights.

If you can do it thats fine. Its not for me though



It is really calorie restriction that is important. I follow more or less, the SB diet though. Plenty of carbs through veggies and limited fruit. Highly processed foods like pasta, bread, crackers, etc have simple carbs, bad fats, and low fiber.

Carbs are still an important part of my diet though. I am a triathlete and know that I couldn't train the way I need to on an Atkins-style diet. On the weekends when my mileage goes way up (runs of 11-16 miles and rides of 65-75 miles), I add in more carbs, including bread, pasta, and sports drinks/bars to fuel those efforts. Pretty much, when my body tells me it needs more carbs, I eat them. For weekday efforts that seldom exceed one hour, veggies and one or two pieces of fruit fill the need.

It may not work for everyone, but I have dropped 20-25 pounds eating this way. I don't feel deprived, although I miss my pasta sometimes - but I get it on the weekends when I truly need it.
Link Posted: 8/15/2005 12:09:42 PM EDT
For cardio run at your lactate threshold. RUnn till your legs start to burn then slowly back off till the burn stops. Run right at the point before you encounter burn. You should feel like you are going to die of a stroke or heart attack or vomit after a 20-30 minute run. Always run at the lactate threshold till you are putting up 8 minute mile pace consistantly. It gets easier after a couple weeks.
Link Posted: 8/15/2005 1:33:20 PM EDT

Originally Posted By DevL:
For cardio run at your lactate threshold. RUnn till your legs start to burn then slowly back off till the burn stops. Run right at the point before you encounter burn. You should feel like you are going to die of a stroke or heart attack or vomit after a 20-30 minute run. Always run at the lactate threshold till you are putting up 8 minute mile pace consistantly. It gets easier after a couple weeks.



A little more impact than what I would recommend to someone who is overweight. Lots of stress on joints and tendons going that hard at first. All of my experience and advice that I have received leads me to tell folks to start with aerobic endurance work 60-70 percent max HR (moderate exertion) and build from there.

The aerobic system is the foundation upon which fitness is built. Without a good one, the lactate threshold work is not as beneficial as it otherwise would be and can lead to injury. For a bigger person, I would recommend starting with some low-moderate impact carido, including easy jogging 3 days/week and 2-3 days/week of some type of strength training (weights or calesthenics) for 2-3 weeks to condition the body for greater efforts.

As always YMMV.
Link Posted: 8/15/2005 9:20:40 PM EDT
For Diet help, Why not consider joining Weight Watchers. Its not just for women and they can tell you how to eat healthier from all the food groups. Plus they track your progress.
Link Posted: 8/25/2005 10:02:31 AM EDT

I'm 6 feet tall and weigh 300 pounds. 245 pounds is NOTHING. Hell 345 wouldnt be bad




i'm 6' 160 and could stand to lose some weight.........................
Link Posted: 8/25/2005 10:42:39 AM EDT
Link Posted: 8/25/2005 11:22:58 AM EDT

Originally Posted By DoubleFeed:

Originally Posted By TexRdnec:

I'm 6 feet tall and weigh 300 pounds. 245 pounds is NOTHING. Hell 345 wouldnt be bad




i'm 6' 160 and could stand to lose some weight.........................

Not very much!



you're one to talk.............we have to tie you to my headache rack at the first hint of a breeze!!
Link Posted: 8/25/2005 12:31:32 PM EDT
I've been holding at about 225 lbs below my peak weight for a few years now. I still have a long, long way to go, but holding where I am is about the best I can do for now. Anyway ...

The bottom line is to consume less than the total of what you burn and excrete. That's sometimes easier said than done, and while some of the "diets" work well (especially in the short term), many of them don't do so well for a life long change in eating habits for a variety of reasons.

That's why I think that assuming you're not getting crazy with bad stuff and have a reasonably balanced diet, the key is portion control. Most otherwise healthy people can eat pretty much anything they want, as long as they don't eat to much of any one thing or too much overall. The problem with that (for me, anyway) is making the decisions when doling out the portions. It's really, really hard to control how much you serve yourself after a while. You can weigh the amounts and count the calories, but over time the amounts will start to creep upward.

What I found that helps the most in that regard is to not make the decisions for yourself. If you have someone else who can prepare your meals for you, all you have to do is eat what they provide and only what they provide. It sounds too simple, but it actually works pretty well and for some reason you learn to be more satisfied with smaller amounts when you don't have the option of adding 50% to the portions. You're still going to be hungry, but it will be less overwhelming in my experience.

Now, that may seem like putting the responsibility for your health on someone else, but you've made the actual decision to do it yourself. You can always deviate if you choose, but it just seems easier to stay with it when you're not planning and thinking about it. You just appear at the table when you meal is ready and eat, then leave (or clean up and leave!).

If you don't have someone who can (or will) help you that way, you can do it for yourself with close to the same effect. It's going to be a lot more expensive, though, because you'll have to buy all of your food in fixed portions. Whether you do your own plan with lean cuisines and healthy choice dinners and entrees, or you enroll in nutri-system, the key is that the portion is fixed and you sort of trick yourself into believing that's all you get. Obviously you defeat the system when you start consuming more than you should, but it's just easier to resist that if you have it planned ahead of time and don't have to make the decisions when it's time to eat and you're at your peak of hunger.

People who are able to feel satiated at some point will do better. For those of us who are still hungry, regardless of how much is in the stomach (even if it's painful), it's a harder uphill battle. I also think it's better to take a more "zen" approach than to have pre-established goals. For those of us who are obese, it's not something you can do until you reach point A in your plan, then just quit because you are finished. You're going to have to deal with this the rest of your life, regardless of how much progress you do or do not make. It's better to have goals of being as healthy as you can be, and always try to make some progress. Realize from the beginning that it's the way the rest of your life is going to be, and just do the best you can.

Don't get obssess over short term failures, as it doesn't matter if you don't lose or even gain a pound or two in any given week or month. What matters is where you are in a year from now and ten years from now.

And don't rely on the scale. Scales cause more problems than they solve, and they do nothing to report changes in body composition such as added muscle and lost fat or water retention. You'll do a lot better if you go by how you look in the mirror and how your clothes fit, and more importantly how you feel. If you have to use a scale, never use it more than once a week. Once a month is probably better.


Good luck!

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