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Posted: 10/22/2010 8:33:59 AM EDT
Any other uses that would justify picking one up over a conventional drill?
Link Posted: 10/22/2010 8:37:45 AM EDT
Link Posted: 10/22/2010 9:02:20 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Destro333:
Any other uses that would justify picking one up over a conventional drill?


You can turn the hammer function on and off on the better ones.
Link Posted: 10/22/2010 11:40:26 AM EDT
Originally Posted By brickeyee:
Originally Posted By Destro333:
Any other uses that would justify picking one up over a conventional drill?


You can turn the hammer function on and off on the better ones.


this plus I have used the hammer function while driving long lag bolts into timbers while doing deck and other large frame projects.

J-

Link Posted: 10/22/2010 12:23:56 PM EDT
Originally Posted By jjc155:
Originally Posted By brickeyee:
Originally Posted By Destro333:
Any other uses that would justify picking one up over a conventional drill?


You can turn the hammer function on and off on the better ones.


this plus I have used the hammer function while driving long lag bolts into timbers while doing deck and other large frame projects.

J-



Great way to reduce the less than great withdrawal strength of lag screws.

What kind of nut goes on a "lag bolt"?


Link Posted: 10/22/2010 6:21:06 PM EDT
Originally Posted By jjc155:
Originally Posted By brickeyee:
Originally Posted By Destro333:
Any other uses that would justify picking one up over a conventional drill?


You can turn the hammer function on and off on the better ones.


this plus I have used the hammer function while driving long lag bolts into timbers while doing deck and other large frame projects.

J-



I don't think you want to use a hammer function for any type of driving.
Link Posted: 10/23/2010 5:25:26 AM EDT
Originally Posted By CTbuilder1:
Originally Posted By jjc155:
Originally Posted By brickeyee:
Originally Posted By Destro333:
Any other uses that would justify picking one up over a conventional drill?


You can turn the hammer function on and off on the better ones.


this plus I have used the hammer function while driving long lag bolts into timbers while doing deck and other large frame projects.

J-





I don't think you want to use a hammer function for any type of driving.


huh, never had a problem with it . Worked on my first house build when I was 7 years old, lol. My step dad was a builder.

J-



Link Posted: 10/23/2010 6:02:58 AM EDT
Originally Posted By jjc155:
Originally Posted By CTbuilder1:
Originally Posted By jjc155:
Originally Posted By brickeyee:
Originally Posted By Destro333:
Any other uses that would justify picking one up over a conventional drill?


You can turn the hammer function on and off on the better ones.


this plus I have used the hammer function while driving long lag bolts into timbers while doing deck and other large frame projects.

J-





I don't think you want to use a hammer function for any type of driving.


huh, never had a problem with it . Worked on my first house build when I was 7 years old, lol. My step dad was a builder.

J-





Stay away from my jobs.
Link Posted: 10/23/2010 6:52:51 AM EDT
Originally Posted By brickeyee:
Originally Posted By jjc155:
Originally Posted By CTbuilder1:
Originally Posted By jjc155:
Originally Posted By brickeyee:
Originally Posted By Destro333:
Any other uses that would justify picking one up over a conventional drill?


You can turn the hammer function on and off on the better ones.


this plus I have used the hammer function while driving long lag bolts into timbers while doing deck and other large frame projects.

J-





I don't think you want to use a hammer function for any type of driving.


huh, never had a problem with it . Worked on my first house build when I was 7 years old, lol. My step dad was a builder.

J-





Stay away from my jobs.


no problem them, LMAO

J-

Link Posted: 10/23/2010 6:57:28 AM EDT
Originally Posted By CTbuilder1:
Originally Posted By jjc155:
Originally Posted By brickeyee:
Originally Posted By Destro333:
Any other uses that would justify picking one up over a conventional drill?


You can turn the hammer function on and off on the better ones.


this plus I have used the hammer function while driving long lag bolts into timbers while doing deck and other large frame projects.

J-



I don't think you want to use a hammer function for any type of driving.


I use them for running tapcons in.  It works better than a non hammer.  Give it short burst and it drives the Tapcon in very well especially if you are having a hard time running them down with a standard drill.
Link Posted: 10/23/2010 7:18:32 AM EDT
Originally Posted By MTNmyMag:
Originally Posted By CTbuilder1:
Originally Posted By jjc155:
Originally Posted By brickeyee:
Originally Posted By Destro333:
Any other uses that would justify picking one up over a conventional drill?


You can turn the hammer function on and off on the better ones.


this plus I have used the hammer function while driving long lag bolts into timbers while doing deck and other large frame projects.

J-



I don't think you want to use a hammer function for any type of driving.


I use them for running tapcons in.  It works better than a non hammer.  Give it short burst and it drives the Tapcon in very well especially if you are having a hard time running them down with a standard drill.


This is where an impact driver shines.  Using rotational force not a linear type force.  All a hammer drill is doing is hitting the back of a screw while you are turning it into place.  It's really not something you should be doing.
Link Posted: 10/23/2010 9:18:34 AM EDT
Originally Posted By CTbuilder1:
Originally Posted By MTNmyMag:
Originally Posted By CTbuilder1:
Originally Posted By jjc155:
Originally Posted By brickeyee:
Originally Posted By Destro333:
Any other uses that would justify picking one up over a conventional drill?


You can turn the hammer function on and off on the better ones.


this plus I have used the hammer function while driving long lag bolts into timbers while doing deck and other large frame projects.

J-



I don't think you want to use a hammer function for any type of driving.


I use them for running tapcons in.  It works better than a non hammer.  Give it short burst and it drives the Tapcon in very well especially if you are having a hard time running them down with a standard drill.


This is where an impact driver shines.  Using rotational force not a linear type force.  All a hammer drill is doing is hitting the back of a screw while you are turning it into place.  It's really not something you should be doing.


It violates the code listing for the tapcons, resulting in reduced strength.

But hey, you should be paid & gone by the time anything fails.

Ethics is what you do when no one is looking.


Link Posted: 10/23/2010 9:50:14 AM EDT
Originally Posted By brickeyee:
Originally Posted By CTbuilder1:
Originally Posted By MTNmyMag:
Originally Posted By CTbuilder1:
Originally Posted By jjc155:
Originally Posted By brickeyee:
Originally Posted By Destro333:
Any other uses that would justify picking one up over a conventional drill?


You can turn the hammer function on and off on the better ones.


this plus I have used the hammer function while driving long lag bolts into timbers while doing deck and other large frame projects.

J-



I don't think you want to use a hammer function for any type of driving.


I use them for running tapcons in.  It works better than a non hammer.  Give it short burst and it drives the Tapcon in very well especially if you are having a hard time running them down with a standard drill.


This is where an impact driver shines.  Using rotational force not a linear type force.  All a hammer drill is doing is hitting the back of a screw while you are turning it into place.  It's really not something you should be doing.


It violates the code listing for the tapcons, resulting in reduced strength.

But hey, you should be paid & gone by the time anything fails.

Ethics is what you do when no one is looking.




The hammer drill violates the code.  In the tapcon specs it says to drive it with rotational force only.  I would never use a hammer drill to drive any type of fastener, nor did I say or imply that I ever would.  Where are you seeing that I have said this?  If you read the thread you will see that I have agreed with you.
Link Posted: 10/23/2010 9:56:09 AM EDT
I have a Hilti TE-7 for my hammer drill, but I also have a chuck for it, which turns it into a great corded drill.
Link Posted: 10/23/2010 1:52:17 PM EDT
Originally Posted By CTbuilder1:
Originally Posted By brickeyee:
Originally Posted By CTbuilder1:
Originally Posted By MTNmyMag:
Originally Posted By CTbuilder1:
Originally Posted By jjc155:
Originally Posted By brickeyee:
Originally Posted By Destro333:
Any other uses that would justify picking one up over a conventional drill?


You can turn the hammer function on and off on the better ones.


this plus I have used the hammer function while driving long lag bolts into timbers while doing deck and other large frame projects.

J-



I don't think you want to use a hammer function for any type of driving.


I use them for running tapcons in.  It works better than a non hammer.  Give it short burst and it drives the Tapcon in very well especially if you are having a hard time running them down with a standard drill.


This is where an impact driver shines.  Using rotational force not a linear type force.  All a hammer drill is doing is hitting the back of a screw while you are turning it into place.  It's really not something you should be doing.


It violates the code listing for the tapcons, resulting in reduced strength.

But hey, you should be paid & gone by the time anything fails.

Ethics is what you do when no one is looking.




The hammer drill violates the code.  In the tapcon specs it says to drive it with rotational force only.  I would never use a hammer drill to drive any type of fastener, nor did I say or imply that I ever would.  Where are you seeing that I have said this?  If you read the thread you will see that I have agreed with you.


I am the one that said it.  It works  I am not using them on anything structural anyway.  Conduit straps is what I mainly Tapcon
Link Posted: 10/24/2010 2:15:58 AM EDT
Originally Posted By CTbuilder1:
Originally Posted By jjc155:
Originally Posted By brickeyee:
Originally Posted By Destro333:
Any other uses that would justify picking one up over a conventional drill?


You can turn the hammer function on and off on the better ones.


this plus I have used the hammer function while driving long lag bolts into timbers while doing deck and other large frame projects.

J-



I don't think you want to use a hammer function for any type of driving.

Do not use the hammer function to install fasteners, hammer should be run at high speed with little resistance, let the tool do the work. If you drive anchors often ( not all ways ) the clutch/gear case assy will fail.
I purchased the MAKITA   LXT218 kit and wish I bought it 5 years ago, take a look.

Link Posted: 10/24/2010 6:38:15 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/24/2010 6:39:16 AM EDT by brickeyee]
Originally Posted By MTNmyMag:
Originally Posted By CTbuilder1:
Originally Posted By brickeyee:
Originally Posted By CTbuilder1:
Originally Posted By MTNmyMag:
Originally Posted By CTbuilder1:
Originally Posted By jjc155:
Originally Posted By brickeyee:
Originally Posted By Destro333:
Any other uses that would justify picking one up over a conventional drill?


You can turn the hammer function on and off on the better ones.


this plus I have used the hammer function while driving long lag bolts into timbers while doing deck and other large frame projects.

J-



I don't think you want to use a hammer function for any type of driving.


I use them for running tapcons in.  It works better than a non hammer.  Give it short burst and it drives the Tapcon in very well especially if you are having a hard time running them down with a standard drill.


This is where an impact driver shines.  Using rotational force not a linear type force.  All a hammer drill is doing is hitting the back of a screw while you are turning it into place.  It's really not something you should be doing.


It violates the code listing for the tapcons, resulting in reduced strength.

But hey, you should be paid & gone by the time anything fails.

Ethics is what you do when no one is looking.




The hammer drill violates the code.  In the tapcon specs it says to drive it with rotational force only.  I would never use a hammer drill to drive any type of fastener, nor did I say or imply that I ever would.  Where are you seeing that I have said this?  If you read the thread you will see that I have agreed with you.


I am the one that said it.  It works  I am not using them on anything structural anyway.  Conduit straps is what I mainly Tapcon


The straps ARE weight bearing,  they are holding up the conduit as required for support under the NEC.

Unless you do not really care if they fall off the walls and ceiling.


Link Posted: 10/24/2010 8:46:53 AM EDT
Look dude, I live in a very small community, I work on my friends and neighbors projects.  Warranty everything, not once have I had a conduit strap fail that was attached in this fashion.  You can worry about it if you want, but I am not.
Link Posted: 10/25/2010 6:30:51 PM EDT




Originally Posted By brickeyee:



Originally Posted By Destro333:

Any other uses that would justify picking one up over a conventional drill?




You can turn the hammer function on and off on the better ones.





I have yet to run into a hammer drill that you couldn't turn to rotary only.



I have a cordless hammer drill, the 299 Dewalt one.  It works nicely.  If you need to do concrete at any frequency other than rarely, pick up a dedicated rotary hammer.  I'm fond of: The Bosch 11224VSRC



It is important if you get a rotary hammer to get one with hammer only mode so that you can chip out concrete with it.
Link Posted: 10/25/2010 7:03:12 PM EDT
Originally Posted By VARifleman:


I have yet to run into a hammer drill that you couldn't turn to rotary only.


I have.  A Milwaukee.  Can't remember what model. I rented it to core some 3" holes in concrete.  Found out it only offered rotary-hammer and hammer.  No rotary only.  Completely useless for what I wanted to do.
Link Posted: 10/25/2010 7:38:09 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/25/2010 8:06:43 PM EDT by VARifleman]




Originally Posted By ragedracer1977:



Originally Posted By VARifleman:





I have yet to run into a hammer drill that you couldn't turn to rotary only.





I have. A Milwaukee. Can't remember what model. I rented it to core some 3" holes in concrete. Found out it only offered rotary-hammer and hammer. No rotary only. Completely useless for what I wanted to do.


If it can core 3" holes in concrete, it's not a hammer drill. Don't try to correct someone when you don't know the terminology.



For those that don't know the difference: Rotary Hammer vs. Hammer Drill The rotary hammer uses a piston for impact while the hammer drill uses a clutch, and hammer drills are really not for concrete use at any serious amount like I pointed out earlier. Masonry they are fine, but it's not fun to drill even a 3/8" hole in concrete with a hammer drill compared to a rotary hammer.
Link Posted: 10/25/2010 8:01:55 PM EDT
Originally Posted By VARifleman:

Originally Posted By ragedracer1977:
Originally Posted By VARifleman:


I have yet to run into a hammer drill that you couldn't turn to rotary only.


I have. A Milwaukee. Can't remember what model. I rented it to core some 3" holes in concrete. Found out it only offered rotary-hammer and hammer. No rotary only. Completely useless for what I wanted to do.

If it can core 3" holes in concrete, it's not a hammer drill. Don't try to correct someone when you don't know the terminology.

For those that don't know the difference: Rotary Hammer vs. Hammer Drill  The rotary hammer uses a piston for impact while the hammer drill uses a clutch, and hammer drills are really not for concrete use at any serious amount like I pointed out earlier.  Masonry they are fine, but it's not fun to drill even a 3/8" hole in concrete with a hammer drill compared to a rotary hammer.



Take the snarky shit back to GD.  And next time, please try to hot link correctly.  I don't know what you're trying to say because the link doesn't work.
Link Posted: 10/25/2010 8:03:52 PM EDT
Link Posted: 10/25/2010 8:08:02 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/25/2010 8:14:31 PM EDT by VARifleman]




Originally Posted By ragedracer1977:



Originally Posted By VARifleman:





Originally Posted By ragedracer1977:



Originally Posted By VARifleman:





I have yet to run into a hammer drill that you couldn't turn to rotary only.





I have. A Milwaukee. Can't remember what model. I rented it to core some 3" holes in concrete. Found out it only offered rotary-hammer and hammer. No rotary only. Completely useless for what I wanted to do.


If it can core 3" holes in concrete, it's not a hammer drill. Don't try to correct someone when you don't know the terminology.



For those that don't know the difference: Rotary Hammer vs. Hammer Drill The rotary hammer uses a piston for impact while the hammer drill uses a clutch, and hammer drills are really not for concrete use at any serious amount like I pointed out earlier. Masonry they are fine, but it's not fun to drill even a 3/8" hole in concrete with a hammer drill compared to a rotary hammer.






Take the snarky shit back to GD. And next time, please try to hot link correctly. I don't know what you're trying to say because the link doesn't work.




Fixed due to some glitch in the editor, I know how to hotlink. And don't be surprised if someone is offened when you try to show they don't know what they're talking about when they actually do.
Link Posted: 10/25/2010 8:10:35 PM EDT
Link Posted: 10/25/2010 8:16:16 PM EDT
Originally Posted By VARifleman:


Fixed due to some glitch in the editor, I know how to hotlink.  And don't be surprised if someone is offened when you try to show they don't know what they're talking about when they actually do.


Hotlink still doesn't work.  I don't think it's the editor, I think it's the page you're trying to link to.

It sure seems silly to be offended by calling a hammer drill a rotary hammer.  I certainly wasn't trying to show you up.
Link Posted: 10/26/2010 4:48:35 AM EDT
Originally Posted By ragedracer1977:
Originally Posted By VARifleman:
Fixed due to some glitch in the editor, I know how to hotlink.  And don't be surprised if someone is offened when you try to show they don't know what they're talking about when they actually do.

Hotlink still doesn't work.  I don't think it's the editor, I think it's the page you're trying to link to.
It sure seems silly to be offended by calling a hammer drill a rotary hammer.  I certainly wasn't trying to show you up.

it's not the page.

the link is broken because the ARFCOM forum software translates two consecutive dashes into an "em dash" –– even when embedded into a URL.

the link to the subject page includes two consecutive dashes, which the forum software duly converts to an em dash, and hence the link is incorrect after it has been processed.  this is clearly an error in the forum software, as nothing inside the URL tags should be stapled, folded, spindled, or mutilated.  

here is what the link should look like
http://www.doityourself.com/stry/rotary-hammers-versus-hammer-drills––whats-the-difference

here is what the link looks like after processing mangling by the board software
http://www.doityourself.com/stry/rotary-hammers-versus-hammer-drills%E2%80%93%E2%80%93whats-the-difference


note the back to back dashes have been unhelpfully "adjusted".

ar-jedi


Link Posted: 10/26/2010 6:49:45 AM EDT
So then if I read that correctly a standard Dewalt DC725KA should NOT be used to drill 1/2" holes in concrete to anchor down a safe?

Link Posted: 10/26/2010 6:53:02 AM EDT
Originally Posted By jlficken:
So then if I read that correctly a standard Dewalt DC725KA should NOT be used to drill 1/2" holes in concrete to anchor down a safe?



You can use a rubber mallet to pound in 16D spikes if you want.  All some people are saying is that the proper tools make most jobs easier.  Just because a tool is capable of a task doesn't mean it is best suited for a task.
Link Posted: 10/26/2010 6:53:25 AM EDT
Link Posted: 10/26/2010 7:01:49 AM EDT
I was on my phone and didn't link to it.  It is this one.

Thanks for the offer beekeeper.

I guess I will go rent the proper tool as I don't want to burn mine up.  I did a couple of shallow (1/2" or so) test drills with it and it seemed like it may not be good on the drill even though that is what I bought it for.  It's a good thing I put a steel roof on a garage as it paid for itself doing that.
Link Posted: 10/26/2010 7:10:15 AM EDT
Originally Posted By jlficken:
So then if I read that correctly a standard Dewalt DC725KA should NOT be used to drill 1/2" holes in concrete to anchor down a safe?

the user manual that came with your DC725 states that the maximum drilling capability in masonry is 1/2" [13mm].  

will this cordless hammer-drill make a 1/2" dia hole in concrete? yes.
can you do it faster with a rotary hammer? yes.
would you use a cordless hammer-drill to drill four 1/2" dia holes?  yes
would you use a rotary hammer instead to drill tons of 1/2" dia holes?  yes

ar-jedi
Link Posted: 10/27/2010 4:25:33 PM EDT




Originally Posted By jlficken:

So then if I read that correctly a standard Dewalt DC725KA should NOT be used to drill 1/2" holes in concrete to anchor down a safe?







It would be a pain, but you could do it as long as you have good percussion rated drill bits.  I would suggest finding out how much it would be to rent a rotary hammer because you're talking about the difference between 15 minutes of drilling, and lots of cussing for an hour or two and sore arms.
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