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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/20/2005 2:22:32 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/24/2005 11:53:21 AM EDT by leelaw]
So I'm looking at getting a 1,100 pound safe with a 26" x 40" footprint, to be installed on the 4th floor of a residential apartment building. It will be near an external wall, so on the joists.

It works out to about 154.43 #/sq. ft. , or 1.072PSI, with a maximum of about 300 pounds to go inside it.

The floor has the usual spaced joists under it, and it looks like 1/4" concrete on top (just below the carpeting)

Any reason why this should not hold?

I've been thinking about going to Home Depot to get some of the 23/32" thick laminated oak boards to put under the safe to make a larger footprint with even weight dispersal. Is this even needed, or should I Really get it, and if so what's the recommendation on the size?

I've spoken to the managers and they refuse to write a letter releasing liability because of "what if there is a fire?"

Thanks in advance.


Got it all figured out, and finally got approval from the maintanence supervisor.

Thanks for your input.
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 2:40:30 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/20/2005 2:40:40 PM EDT by leelaw]
Add: Upon further investigation, the concrete is at least 1 1/4" thick.
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 8:10:27 PM EDT
Bump for the night crew.
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 8:14:28 PM EDT
Are you sure it is 11/4 concrete slab on top of usual 16" spaced 2X6 floor joists? It doesn't sound right. I would expect a steel beam support structure.
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 8:50:17 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ZW17:
Are you sure it is 11/4 concrete slab on top of usual 16" spaced 2X6 floor joists? It doesn't sound right. I would expect a steel beam support structure.



I'm trying to get more info out from the managers, but they're being pissy (the main one asked me why anyone would want their own safe - the idea was foreign to her)

Trying to see if I can get a blueprint on the building, or at least a description form the facility handyman.
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 10:35:26 PM EDT
My only real concern is that the safe would crack the concrete during installation. If you are not using the piece of carpet and slide trick or a hand truck/pallet jack, you are probably using a 4 wheel dolly and concentrating the force on the 4 wheels at 225 pounds per square inch. Unsupported, unreinforced concrete between the joists could be in danger.

Boards, plywood or OSB will help spread out the load and is cheap insurance.

YMMV.......SRM
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 10:40:59 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SRM:
My only real concern is that the safe would crack the concrete during installation. If you are not using the piece of carpet and slide trick or a hand truck/pallet jack, you are probably using a 4 wheel dolly and concentrating the force on the 4 wheels at 225 pounds per square inch. Unsupported, unreinforced concrete between the joists could be in danger.

Boards, plywood or OSB will help spread out the load and is cheap insurance.

YMMV.......SRM



I'm having it installed by professionals - they'll have metal plates to roll the safe on until it is set in place.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 12:54:16 AM EDT
In this area residential floors are only required to support 30 to 40 lbs per square foot of live load.
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