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9/19/2017 7:27:10 PM
Posted: 6/13/2003 11:41:34 AM EDT
Just curious, I am starting my flight training towards a part 61 certificate and just wanted to see how many others on this board have gone through the process and any advice they may have to offer. Thanks.
Link Posted: 6/13/2003 11:56:49 AM EDT
Yep! Been flying since '79. It's turned into my most expensive hobby. It got to expensive to rent so I built my own plane a single seat RV-3, first flew it in '87. Since then I've built another, a two seat RV-4. I love aerobatics and just can't get enough of that upside-down stuff... Have fun-
Link Posted: 6/13/2003 11:57:34 AM EDT
Soon. 28.8 hours.
Link Posted: 6/13/2003 11:59:35 AM EDT
Got mine in 1980. Find a good professional instructor, i.e. somebody older with experience vs. the younger types who are only instructing to build time for an airline job. I had 5 different instructors by the time I got my certificate, all but one were great (the first one). Even though the regs no longer require it, I would get some spin training (around the time you solo) and an aerobatic course after you get your license, both are great confidence builders. Also try to fly with an operation based at a smaller, less congested airport, it equals more quality air time and less waiting on the ground or being driven around by controllers. Good luck!
Link Posted: 6/13/2003 12:06:51 PM EDT
I am just a student myself...have been for the last couple of years...can not find the time to finish..anyway...I would say to fly the plane like it should be flown...I have had instructors who would coach me in approaches..when to cut power...etc...and we always came in fast...I finally flew the plane as I thought it should be flown and we started making decent appraches and not gliding half way down the runway.....in other words...if your instructor is not in tune with you and your learning...then find another...you are just wasting your time and money. I wasted two hours flying fast appraoches because this guy was clueless...and frustrated the hell outa me in the process....other than that....always look out for other traffic...ALWAYS! Be Safe and Good Luck!
Link Posted: 6/13/2003 12:24:00 PM EDT
Passed my checkride on Sept. 10, 2001 - I now have ~145 hours and complex / high performance edorsements. Recently started work on my IFR ticket. -Niel PP-ASEL
Link Posted: 6/13/2003 12:36:00 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/13/2003 12:38:22 PM EDT by Hipower]
Yep. Got my PPL in '89. Flew off and on (mostly off) for a few years until about 2000 when I bought a share of a 1979 Warrior (PA28-161). I really started to enjoy flying when I was free to take the plane and not have to worry about anyone elses schedule. The partnership was pretty good but I had some issues with one of the other owners and was fortunate enough to be in a postion to buy a plane outright. It took me about a year to find a nicely restored 1978 AA5B Tiger that my wife and I agreed was the kind of plane we'd feel comfortable taking friends in. I've now had the Tiger going on 2 years and love it. As far as advice, the best I can give is study hard, fly often and never walk away from a flight without learning something. We've had a fairly incredible string of crappy weekends here on the east coast and I wasn't able to fly for over a month. I got out for some air and pattern work just to sharpen up on monday, and could not believe how much my skills had diminished in that period. The flight prior, I had to negotiate the TFR's around DC, plus the P40 resticted area to get over the the eastern shore of Delaware and it was no where near as tough as that hour of practice, since I had been flying regularly when I made that flight.
Link Posted: 6/26/2003 1:14:04 PM EDT
Workin on instrument.
Link Posted: 6/26/2003 2:58:20 PM EDT
Started in the mid '70's out of High School. Got to CFI and taught 600 hours in one year. That was before the crash/bust of 80-81. Went from teaching 6 hours a day to maybe 6 hours a week if I was lucky. Didn't have enough hours or bucks to keep working my way up the ladder so dropped out with just under a thousand hours. Fast forward to 1999. Got back in the saddle and ended up logging about 200 hours over the next 2 years. Had a blast and was planning to reactivate my CFI and tack another "I" to it when 9/11 hit. I had just quit my dot-com job (the job would have gone dot-boom a month later anyway) and the bottom dropped out of everything again. Can't say I don't have timing [:D] Haven't been in the air since a few days before 9/11. Been going through my DV and VHS-C collections from our trips, doing some editing and it's got me thinking about it again. Flying is the one thing that I've been involved with in my life that I feel that I have a talent for, am good at and enjoy. Everything else I do I feel like either an imposter or I'm just going through tne motions.
Link Posted: 6/26/2003 8:26:12 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/26/2003 9:00:29 PM EDT by a320az]
Originally Posted By samsi: Got mine in 1980. Find a good professional instructor, i.e. somebody older with experience vs. the younger types who are only instructing to build time for an airline job. I had 5 different instructors by the time I got my certificate, all but one were great (the first one). Even though the regs no longer require it, I would get some spin training (around the time you solo) and an aerobatic course after you get your license, both are great confidence builders. Also try to fly with an operation based at a smaller, less congested airport, it equals more quality air time and less waiting on the ground or being driven around by controllers. Good luck!
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Whats your prob with young CFI's. I dont know anyone who would want to instruct for their career. Therefore alot of CFI's you are going to find that are "time builders". Ive never had and instructor over 30 years old. My DE's however have all been older. I respect the older guys but cannot relate with them sometimes. I used to go over to my instructors aparment have a few beers and study. I couldnt imagine doing that with a 50+ guy...
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