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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/7/2010 5:05:00 PM EDT
Do you like your job? Is the pay worth the risk? Just looking for some honest insight from any current or former miners
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 5:08:34 PM EDT
I looked into it a while back, but when I found out that nobody will sell them liquor, handguns or tobacco I decided against it.
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 5:11:20 PM EDT
If you dig it, you can find it to be real down-to-earth work. Just be careful that you don't get in over your head.
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 5:15:35 PM EDT
Originally Posted By piccolo:
I looked into it a while back, but when I found out that nobody will sell them liquor, handguns or tobacco I decided against it.


What's the story behind that?
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 5:15:45 PM EDT
You won't find many jobs that start at 40K (and benefits) with just a high school diploma and a mine safety course. I have worked with former miners, obviously these were guys that didn't like it and went to do something else. Its hard, dirty, dangerous work. I would rather stay in the infantry personally.
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 5:16:11 PM EDT
Under ground mining is not desirable. Above ground mining could be a kick in the ass if it was not for MSHA climbing up your ass all the time.
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 5:16:16 PM EDT
pogo works in a gold mine up near Fairbanks. He can tell you about what safety courses you need, what trades they are looking for.

I think this is a mining vocational school, not sure about its reputation among employers:

http://www.dmtcalaska.org/
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 5:20:24 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Joedan:
Originally Posted By piccolo:
I looked into it a while back, but when I found out that nobody will sell them liquor, handguns or tobacco I decided against it.


What's the story behind that?


miner minor

Dad mined in the 70s&80s. I did mine inspection for a while in college. Around here you can start making about $20 an hour from one of the good companies. You can make more if you operate equipment.
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 5:22:52 PM EDT
Damn I'm slow tonight
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 5:26:13 PM EDT
Down in Florida you would be doing what, phosphates? Some of that is pretty cool, mostly above ground too.
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 5:27:20 PM EDT
I'd be up in the WV/OH/PA area if I decide to go this route
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 5:32:15 PM EDT
Starting out you may have to work in a shithole and get a year or two experience, before getting hired on somewhere better. Having other certifications, like being an EMT, can help your odds of getting hired on.
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 5:32:45 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Lead-slinger:
MSHA climbing up your ass all the time.


This is true. MSHA was created to help protect miners, but has become more interested in handing out fines.
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 5:34:39 PM EDT
Originally Posted By aknoob:
Originally Posted By Lead-slinger:
MSHA climbing up your ass all the time.


This is true. MSHA was created to help protect miners, but has become more interested in handing out fines.


Especially with the current administration. It is one of the reasons I left MSHA, they have really lost track of their roots.
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 5:34:43 PM EDT
I work in an underground coal mine in WV, and I actually enjoy my work. If you work at a mine that takes safety seriously and takes the steps to make sure that things are done the correct way then it is not as dangerous as most people would lead you to believe. However, if you work at a mine where the goal is to load as much coal as possible no matter what then there is a better chance that you will get hurt or killed.

At most mines you will make between $25 and $30 an hour and you will more than likely work a lot of overtime so you will probably make between $75,000 and $90,000 a year in my experience.
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 5:39:37 PM EDT
Most of the older males in my family were miners. Never heard any of them complain about the work. If you go underground get in a mine you can stand up in. Working in a 28 inch seam of coal is hard on a person. The Pittsburgh seam runs about 8 feet in height and there's a lot of mines in it.

One of my B-I-Ls told me a few months back that they were having a hard time finding workers.
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 5:47:49 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Lowemac:
I work in an underground coal mine in WV, and I actually enjoy my work. If you work at a mine that takes safety seriously and takes the steps to make sure that things are done the correct way then it is not as dangerous as most people would lead you to believe. However, if you work at a mine where the goal is to load as much coal as possible no matter what then there is a better chance that you will get hurt or killed.

At most mines you will make between $25 and $30 an hour and you will more than likely work a lot of overtime so you will probably make between $75,000 and $90,000 a year in my experience.


Coming from a coal mining family this has been my experience as well. Find the right mines and you'll get bonus's and a few more perks.
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 5:55:13 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/7/2010 5:55:59 PM EDT by jnk556]
I have some great uncles and a grandpa that were miners.

I know that SlipShot762 work in a coal mine in KY

Actually a great line a work giving the chance I'd go to the mines in a heart beat.
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 6:00:51 PM EDT
Originally Posted By maddmatt:
Originally Posted By aknoob:
Originally Posted By Lead-slinger:
MSHA climbing up your ass all the time.


This is true. MSHA was created to help protect miners, but has become more interested in handing out fines.


Especially with the current administration. It is one of the reasons I left MSHA, they have really lost track of their roots.


MSHA is a real PITA that is for sure. Love working around heavy equipment.
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 6:03:08 PM EDT

Yep. UMR class of '84.

Link Posted: 9/7/2010 6:05:37 PM EDT

Link Posted: 9/7/2010 6:13:33 PM EDT
My grandfather was a coal miner in KY, he was luck enough to retire from it. Thankfully my dad joined the Air Force and got the hell out of there, and was stationed in TX where he met my mom. I had a cousin that worked in the coal mines. He was killed in one.

Him and a few other guys were taking their lunch break, one older guy left his hammer or something where they were working and he was going to get up to walk over and pick it up. My cousin said that he'd get it for him. He walked over to where it was, bent over to pick it up and a slab of rock fell from the ceiling and hit him in the head killing him.
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 6:53:42 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Mech2007:

Yep. UMR class of '84.



UMR Class of '03, '05, '10....though technically it's MS&T '10 and I wont complete a Mining degree until next year.
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 8:12:16 PM EDT
In the Luzerne County (PA) Historical Society, I found an obituary for my great-great-grandfather (direct male line) in microfilm of the local paper. Cross-referencing the Report of the Department of Mines from 1906, I found he was fatally injured on March 19, 1906 when he was "squeezed between car and prop on slope." His son, my great-grandfather, also died in the same mine. On July 12, 1912, he was "killed by being struck by piece of coal that fell down the shaft."
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 8:19:05 PM EDT
Originally Posted By von_landstuhl:
In the Luzerne County (PA) Historical Society, I found an obituary for my great-great-grandfather (direct male line) in microfilm of the local paper. Cross-referencing the Report of the Department of Mines from 1906, I found he was fatally injured on March 19, 1906 when he was "squeezed between car and prop on slope." His son, my great-grandfather, also died in the same mine. On July 12, 1912, he was "killed by being struck by piece of coal that fell down the shaft."


Great grandfather also killed in those mines. Did you happen to find which one?
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 9:25:57 PM EDT
My great grandfather and his brother were killed in a copper mine in Morenci AZ 1900, electrocuted. My grandfather, father, 5 uncles, brother worked underground mining. I have a nephew who is currently a welder working for a mining outfit here in AZ. He made $98,000 last year. Most copper mines run operations on the gold and other precious metals extracted with copper ore.

When I graduated from high school, my old man asked if I wanted to work in the mine, I passed.
As far back as I could remember as a child, someone would get hurt or killed about every 2 years.
My old man was crushed, broke his leg, was laid up for 9 months. 2 uncles got blasted in premature
detonations, 1 injured bad enough to not be allowed to do heavy work, the other was peppered real bad, but went back underground with no serious injuries. 1 lost his toes when a battery from an electric train, fell off the rig while rounding a corner. Brother almost crushed by slab of rock bigger than him.

Dangerous
Link Posted: 9/8/2010 1:46:03 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/8/2010 2:01:25 PM EDT by von_landstuhl]

Originally Posted By Bob243:
Originally Posted By von_landstuhl:
In the Luzerne County (PA) Historical Society, I found an obituary for my great-great-grandfather (direct male line) in microfilm of the local paper. Cross-referencing the Report of the Department of Mines from 1906, I found he was fatally injured on March 19, 1906 when he was "squeezed between car and prop on slope." His son, my great-grandfather, also died in the same mine. On July 12, 1912, he was "killed by being struck by piece of coal that fell down the shaft."


Great grandfather also killed in those mines. Did you happen to find which one?

From memory, I'm pretty sure it was the Dorrance Mine (I'm in Georgia and my records are in Ohio). If you have a relative killed in Pennsylvania mines, it's very likely their name has been recorded in the Report of the Department of Mines.

Here's and example I found from the report of 1920:


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