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Posted: 1/31/2011 8:56:41 PM EDT


I'm in the final semester of a philosophy degree, and have become fascinated by my 'philosophy of water' course.  I'm not exactly sure why hydrology interests me so much, but I just can't stop studying––it's actually interfering with my other coursework.  I had originally intended to pursue post-grad work in counseling psychology or law, but since those markets are so oversaturated, I've been looking at other options.  I think I might have found it––the subject is fascinating, and from what I understand, the market is actually growing.  So I'm considering adding a second bachelor's and pursuing this as a profession.



I've requested information from Tarleton State and UT Austin regarding a BS in hydrology, and Texas A&M about their water management MS.  Here's my problem––since I'm coming out of a BA program, I would need a fair amount of math/science remediation, which is going to wind up costing a lot of money when combined with the coursework towards a degree.



So my question is: are there any viable options in the field for a BA, or is a BS or MS going to be necessary?  Part of the draw is the idea of doing a fair amount of work outdoors and on-site, and that seems to call for geoscience/engineering training.  But is this the only option?



All insight and advice would be appreciated.





Link Posted: 1/31/2011 9:06:08 PM EDT
[#1]
I've done some work for these guys...they have an interesting patented product and have a lot of work right now. I'm not sure if this helps you in any way...





http://www.stormchambers.com

 
Link Posted: 1/31/2011 9:19:09 PM EDT
[#2]
I'm a Civil Engineering student, specializing in water/wastewater management and geotechnical engineering.  Don't waste your time with a 'hydrology' degree.  Get a Civil Engineering degree or an Environmental Engineering degree.  The best you can maybe do with a hydrology degree is run a small municipal water or wastewater treatmen plant, and there are plenty of guys getting the various certificates needed to do that.  For the bigger municipalities, its an engineering degree minimum.

Edit:  The math isn't that hard for an engineering degree anyway.  For a Civil, its Calculus 1,2,3, Differential Equations, and a few basic Statistics courses.  Most engineering students finish off those courses in the first 2 years of school.
Link Posted: 1/31/2011 9:34:45 PM EDT
[#3]
Go for the Civil Engineering degree and choose Water Resources courses for electives.  You will open up more options that way and allows you to become licensed.  Being licensed will allow yourself to sign off on construction projects and will increase your value.  Even if you want to be specific to hydrology, someone still needs to sign the studies.   If you can stand staying in school, a Masters in Water Resources is fairly common in the field, so that further increases your odds of getting a job.
Link Posted: 1/31/2011 9:40:26 PM EDT
[#4]



Quoted:


I'm a Civil Engineering student, specializing in water/wastewater
management and geotechnical engineering.  Don't waste your time with a
'hydrology' degree.  Get a Civil Engineering degree or an Environmental
Engineering degree.  The best you can maybe
do with a hydrology degree is run a small municipal water or wastewater
treatmen plant, and there are plenty of guys getting the various
certificates needed to do that.  For the bigger municipalities, its an
engineering degree minimum.



Edit:
 The math isn't that hard for an engineering degree anyway.  For a
Civil, its Calculus 1,2,3, Differential Equations, and a few basic
Statistics courses.  Most engineering students finish off those courses
in the first 2 years of school.
This is a start. A BS in Civil Engineering with a water focus will open more doors than any hydrology degree





To answer your question, not a lot will transfer between a BA in philosophy and hydrology, so you'll essentially be starting over. I would suggest, if you like the subject so much and don't mind a few extra years, to get a BSCE with elective course work in both water and construction (to get you outside, on site). Coastal engineering and environmental engineering with a water focus are also both viable alternatives to get you working with water and outside at the same time.



Me personally, I'm a year from graduating with a BSCE, taking a balanced course load but a few extra courses in water and construction (sound familiar?) to hopefully end up doing project management or field engineering on coastal or water based projects. So I know the feeling.



Don't get stuck doing something you don't love. Don't get stuck doing something that you wake up and dread doing every day. If you wanna do something with hydrology, find the best route that suits you, plan ahead, and go for it.



Just my 2 cents. Good luck!



 
Link Posted: 1/31/2011 9:59:15 PM EDT
[#5]
Yeah, the differences between a philo and a civil degree mean that little more than your gen ed requirements will transfer, so be prepared for that.  Besides the math I mentioned, the basics for a civil degree (not including your emphases) are statics, dynamics, mechanics of materials, soil mechanics, intro to environmental engineering, contracts, traffic engineering, surveying, building systems (HVAC, elec, plumbing, etc) structural engineering, fluid mechanics, water resources (yeah, 2 basic water courses before you get to the interesting stuff), construction materials (steel, concrete, asphalt), steel or concrete as an emphasis, and probably several others that I'm forgetting because I've been in school a damn long time it seems.  Know what you're getting into.

And if you do go Civil or similar, make damn sure its an ABET accredited program, otherwise your wasting your money.
Link Posted: 1/31/2011 10:11:46 PM EDT
[#6]
Link Posted: 1/31/2011 10:22:05 PM EDT
[#7]
Or....


You can be like me. Right place at the right time.

I was a pipefitter/welder for ten years before I lost my mind and became a cop. Did lots of pipeline/refinery work, worked a couple nukes, but I was also one of the few union pipefitters willing to get in the ditch and install water/sewer mains. Worked some WTP/WWTP plants and got squared away with pumps, wells and controls.

Fast forward about 17 years worth of LE and ten surgeries, and I was just running my welding truck (again) when a small town needed a Public Works supervisor. Mostly admin, but a lot of hands-on stuff my crew had never done before as new infrastructure, only maintenance and operation. I learned what they knew about keeping a dying pump running and coaxing old lines to provide fireflows; I taught them how to install mains, thrust blocks, achieve compaction, manifold for controls and fab what can no longer be bought for replacement.

We're doing a $6M water system improvement bond right now; my guys had never seen a 125' tall water tower, never knew about pressure-reducing/maintaining valves, and can't believe we're gonna keep a 1MG direct-treatment, rapid-sand filter water plant running while it's expanded to 4MG.

Engineers pulling one way, politicians pulling the other. Every day is literally a new challenge.

I was pretty lucky to fall into this. It pays about $40K with decent bennies, and I have to plow snow when one of my crew is sick or off; rodding a stuck sewer main in a snowstorm is an experience.

I have a high school diploma from the 1970s and about 250 college units. I'll likely never have a degree. BFD. I'm licensed as a Water Distribution and Wastewater Collection System Operator, will have the level 1 plant certs for each here in a couple years. And I have dibs on all the pipe welding.

Don't pigeonhole yourself into one discipline or realm of expertise; there's no such thing as bad free training or experience. And don't be afraid to get your hands dirty.
Link Posted: 1/31/2011 11:17:03 PM EDT
[#8]
Before you go too far in any one direction, I'd suggest you try to get an idea of what kind of hydrology you want to do.

I'm a hydrogeologist with ~12 years at a major water utility.  I started as an intern while I was working on a bachelors degree in geology. I did a research project that was of interest to my employer and they funded my laboratory fees and field work for a masters thesis I Just completed last summer.

My current primary duties are in water resource development. Some of my time is devoted to identifying potential targets to drill for water production. This involves looking at both the structure in basins and the lithology (what is likely to yield water and what isn't). Sometimes I even get paid to hike (geologic mapping).

I also work with wells (well design, well drilling, well development, physical water level measurements, performance step tests, well rehabilitation)

A good portion of my time is spent driving a computer (Arc, some CAD, Surfer, and Just enough MODFLOW to know I don't want to be a modeler). I make maps, generate potentiometric surfaces and geologic cross sections.


I say all this to illustrate just a portion of the breadth of the discipline. The surface water side of things often involves things like channel design and whatnot - This almost exclusively requires an engineering degree and associated certifications also useful if you want to design water treatment and delivery systems. What I do is often accomplished with a geology (or sometimes earth science degree) Most of my coworkers only hold a B.S.

There is also the soul sucking environmental side of things (my wife does this- she has a CEM. I sometimes tease her and call her a groundwater janitor). Most of the consulting firms are effective youth grinders. Many people only work at these places for a few years and realize the work isn't for them, others thrive on it. If you go to work for a small but active firm you could easily find yourself doing any one of or all of the above.

Link Posted: 2/1/2011 10:44:35 AM EDT
[#9]




Quoted:

Before you go too far in any one direction, I'd suggest you try to get an idea of what kind of hydrology you want to do.



I'm a hydrogeologist with ~12 years at a major water utility. I started as an intern while I was working on a bachelors degree in geology. I did a research project that was of interest to my employer and they funded my laboratory fees and field work for a masters thesis I Just completed last summer.



My current primary duties are in water resource development. Some of my time is devoted to identifying potential targets to drill for water production. This involves looking at both the structure in basins and the lithology (what is likely to yield water and what isn't). Sometimes I even get paid to hike (geologic mapping).



I also work with wells (well design, well drilling, well development, physical water level measurements, performance step tests, well rehabilitation)



A good portion of my time is spent driving a computer (Arc, some CAD, Surfer, and Just enough MODFLOW to know I don't want to be a modeler). I make maps, generate potentiometric surfaces and geologic cross sections.





I say all this to illustrate just a portion of the breadth of the discipline. The surface water side of things often involves things like channel design and whatnot - This almost exclusively requires an engineering degree and associated certifications also useful if you want to design water treatment and delivery systems. What I do is often accomplished with a geology (or sometimes earth science degree) Most of my coworkers only hold a B.S.



There is also the soul sucking environmental side of things (my wife does this- she has a CEM. I sometimes tease her and call her a groundwater janitor). Most of the consulting firms are effective youth grinders. Many people only work at these places for a few years and realize the work isn't for them, others thrive on it. If you go to work for a small but active firm you could easily find yourself doing any one of or all of the above.







this is exactly the kind of information that i was looking for.  from what i've looked at so far, i'm leaning towards geosciences, economics, or (!) environmental.



why is the latter so soul-sucking?
Link Posted: 2/1/2011 10:56:29 AM EDT
[#10]



Quoted:



this is exactly the kind of information that i was looking for.  from what i've looked at so far, i'm leaning towards geosciences, economics, or (!) environmental.



why is the latter so soul-sucking?

I'll handle that one.


It's because no matter what you do or think, in the enviro consulting gig, you're working for the Bad Guy (tm).  You're either helping Big Oil hide their messes and make an immoral profit, you dirty mercenary you, or you're helping Big Gov oppress the innocent businessman who only wants to provide jobs, you liberal fascist you.







/I compromise by working for a firm that has Big Oil/Gold, Little Mom&Pop, *and* Big Gov as clients


//And then on weekends I go do geology on my own time



 
Link Posted: 2/1/2011 11:02:00 AM EDT
[#11]




Quoted:





Quoted:



this is exactly the kind of information that i was looking for. from what i've looked at so far, i'm leaning towards geosciences, economics, or (!) environmental.



why is the latter so soul-sucking?


I'll handle that one.





It's because no matter what you do or think, in the enviro consulting gig, you're working for the Bad Guy (tm). You're either helping Big Oil hide their messes and make an immoral profit, you dirty mercenary you, or you're helping Big Gov oppress the innocent businessman who only wants to provide jobs, you liberal fascist you.













/I compromise by working for a firm that has Big Oil/Gold, Little Mom&Pop, *and* Big Gov as clients





//And then on weekends I go do geology on my own time





that's quality stuff right there!





Link Posted: 2/1/2011 11:05:55 AM EDT
[#12]
I manage both a bulk spring water production plant, and a bottling plant. I deal with both hydro geologists and environmental engineers almost daily and I must say that every bit of advice you are getting is sound.

The environmental engineers who do our source monitoring seem to be happy to get out of the office once a week to go walk out in the woods and monitor our water levels. They also develop reports for my state and local compliance etc. Generally great people to work with. They are currently putting together my application for my NY bottling license. Good blend of science and mother nature in that field.

Process engineers have a pretty cool job designing systems as well. Might be worth looking into.
Link Posted: 2/1/2011 11:07:23 AM EDT
[#13]



Quoted:






that's quality stuff right there!








Hah, hope it helps.  Here's another bit of Official Geologist Advice: don't get too hung up on what degree you end up with, as long as it is a BS, not a BA.  We have a whole slew of different degrees running around here, but the one thing they have in common is they're all BS degrees, not a single BA to be seen.







All of my buddies with jobs and degrees have that in common as well, BA is great for working Libraries, Welfare Offices, and Burger King.  Want a real job?  Get a BS in *anything*.



 
Link Posted: 2/1/2011 11:07:58 AM EDT
[#14]




Quoted:





Quoted:

I'm a Civil Engineering student, specializing in water/wastewater management and geotechnical engineering. Don't waste your time with a 'hydrology' degree. Get a Civil Engineering degree or an Environmental Engineering degree. The best you can maybe do with a hydrology degree is run a small municipal water or wastewater treatmen plant, and there are plenty of guys getting the various certificates needed to do that. For the bigger municipalities, its an engineering degree minimum.



Edit: The math isn't that hard for an engineering degree anyway. For a Civil, its Calculus 1,2,3, Differential Equations, and a few basic Statistics courses. Most engineering students finish off those courses in the first 2 years of school.
This is a start. A BS in Civil Engineering with a water focus will open more doors than any hydrology degree



To answer your question, not a lot will transfer between a BA in philosophy and hydrology, so you'll essentially be starting over. I would suggest, if you like the subject so much and don't mind a few extra years, to get a BSCE with elective course work in both water and construction (to get you outside, on site). Coastal engineering and environmental engineering with a water focus are also both viable alternatives to get you working with water and outside at the same time.



Me personally, I'm a year from graduating with a BSCE, taking a balanced course load but a few extra courses in water and construction (sound familiar?) to hopefully end up doing project management or field engineering on coastal or water based projects. So I know the feeling.



Don't get stuck doing something you don't love. Don't get stuck doing something that you wake up and dread doing every day. If you wanna do something with hydrology, find the best route that suits you, plan ahead, and go for it.



Just my 2 cents. Good luck!





i'm still kicking the engineering idea around, but i have to admit that it just doesn't interest me as much as the geosciences and policy end of the spectrum.  i won't lie––the math load scares me.  my limited exposure to diffEQ left me scarred for life.  there's also a financial component to it––the engineering track would take me another year of full time, and i don't want to take out any student loans.



really though, my interests just lie elsewhere.
Link Posted: 2/1/2011 11:08:32 AM EDT
[#15]



Quoted:

 The environmental engineers who do our source monitoring seem to be happy to get out of the office once a week to go walk out in the woods and monitor our water levels.


Oh god so very this.  The longer I work here, the more I get promoted, the less I get to go outside.  Hence the doing geology on my own time.



 
Link Posted: 2/1/2011 11:11:42 AM EDT
[#16]




Quoted:





All of my buddies with jobs and degrees have that in common as well, BA is great for working Libraries, Welfare Offices, and Burger King. Want a real job? Get a BS in *anything*.







yeah––the BA in philosophy was intended to be a precursor to a PhD in psychology.



sadly, my school doesn't offer a BS in phil.  i guess it's assumed that all we do is BS anyway.



Link Posted: 2/1/2011 11:12:43 AM EDT
[#17]
I was an environmental resource manager (diversified land/water stuff) and had 18 years in the industries of water/wastewater consulting on small private facilities and contract operations. I also ran plants for municipalities.

The field is pretty open, the work is fascinating and interesting, you just can't talk about it at a dinner party.

Paid the bills for me for quite a few years and eventually sold my biz.
Link Posted: 2/1/2011 11:13:27 AM EDT
[#18]




Quoted:





Quoted:

The environmental engineers who do our source monitoring seem to be happy to get out of the office once a week to go walk out in the woods and monitor our water levels.


Oh god so very this. The longer I work here, the more I get promoted, the less I get to go outside. Hence the doing geology on my own time.



so the engineering side actually gets more fieldwork, even on non-construction stuff?

Link Posted: 2/1/2011 11:14:37 AM EDT
[#19]
Also worth noting, I was having a chat with the owner of the engineering firm we work with. He was at the plant talking about things and introduced me to his new employee that will be helping me prepare my NY bottling license. He told me they had a great year last year actually hired a couple new guys fresh out of school.
Link Posted: 2/1/2011 11:16:41 AM EDT
[#20]



Quoted:





Quoted:




Quoted:

The environmental engineers who do our source monitoring seem to be happy to get out of the office once a week to go walk out in the woods and monitor our water levels.


Oh god so very this. The longer I work here, the more I get promoted, the less I get to go outside. Hence the doing geology on my own time.



so the engineering side actually gets more fieldwork, even on non-construction stuff?


No, the noobs get all the field work, because that's the way the budgets work.  Senior guys only get to go out to get information to prepare bids/proposals, meet with big wigs, and double check noobs work.










 
Link Posted: 2/1/2011 11:19:24 AM EDT
[#21]
Quoted:

Quoted:

Quoted:

Quoted:
The environmental engineers who do our source monitoring seem to be happy to get out of the office once a week to go walk out in the woods and monitor our water levels.

Oh god so very this. The longer I work here, the more I get promoted, the less I get to go outside. Hence the doing geology on my own time.

so the engineering side actually gets more fieldwork, even on non-construction stuff?
No, the noobs get all the field work, because that's the way the budgets work.  Senior guys only get to go out to get information to prepare bids/proposals, meet with big wigs, and double check noobs work.





 


Ha ha, you are so right.

Hey siren, listen to this guy. He knows what he is talking about.
Link Posted: 2/1/2011 11:25:10 AM EDT
[#22]
Quoted:

Quoted:

this is exactly the kind of information that i was looking for.  from what i've looked at so far, i'm leaning towards geosciences, economics, or (!) environmental.

why is the latter so soul-sucking?
I'll handle that one.

It's because no matter what you do or think, in the enviro consulting gig, you're working for the Bad Guy (tm).  You're either helping Big Oil hide their messes and make an immoral profit, you dirty mercenary you, or you're helping Big Gov oppress the innocent businessman who only wants to provide jobs, you liberal fascist you.




/I compromise by working for a firm that has Big Oil/Gold, Little Mom&Pop, *and* Big Gov as clients

//And then on weekends I go do geology on my own time

 


You sir, have described exactly what I do as well and my basic feelings on it. Bravo.

Thats not to say I don't enjoy my job, I do, and I get to see some stuff  that's pretty cool but there is stuff that sucks as well.

Though sadly for me SE Texas is lacking on a lot of cool surface geology hardrock. My personal rock mining is fairly limited to what I get to do on vacations to the mountain states

And also, I have a BS in geology. I've been in the environmental field for four and a half years. I'm just now moving into some more of the regulatory/office work parts. It does cut down on your field time, which again is good and bad. Though on that side I've got pretty extensive field experience and the most experience behind a rig out of all the under management people in our Texas division(and more than many of the managers).  So I'm kinda ready to move on a bit. I'm also going to be taking my first crack at the FG this fall. I'm expecting to abuse myself fairly well to pass that in the next year or two.

Another point to OP, once you decide on a degree, get into a internship(s). There is no replacement for experience. Also if you end up in a geoscience, take the FG while you're still fresh out of school. Having to cram  years of unused geo stuff back into your head ain't the greatest.
Link Posted: 2/1/2011 11:29:28 AM EDT
[#23]
If you're interested in hydrology, be sure to see "Urinetown, The Musical"  
Link Posted: 2/1/2011 11:35:34 AM EDT
[#24]
Quoted:
Before you go too far in any one direction, I'd suggest you try to get an idea of what kind of hydrology you want to do.

I'm a hydrogeologist with ~12 years at a major water utility.  I started as an intern while I was working on a bachelors degree in geology. I did a research project that was of interest to my employer and they funded my laboratory fees and field work for a masters thesis I Just completed last summer.

My current primary duties are in water resource development. Some of my time is devoted to identifying potential targets to drill for water production. This involves looking at both the structure in basins and the lithology (what is likely to yield water and what isn't). Sometimes I even get paid to hike (geologic mapping).

I also work with wells (well design, well drilling, well development, physical water level measurements, performance step tests, well rehabilitation)

A good portion of my time is spent driving a computer (Arc, some CAD, Surfer, and Just enough MODFLOW to know I don't want to be a modeler). I make maps, generate potentiometric surfaces and geologic cross sections.


I say all this to illustrate just a portion of the breadth of the discipline. The surface water side of things often involves things like channel design and whatnot - This almost exclusively requires an engineering degree and associated certifications also useful if you want to design water treatment and delivery systems. What I do is often accomplished with a geology (or sometimes earth science degree) Most of my coworkers only hold a B.S.

There is also the soul sucking environmental side of things (my wife does this- she has a CEM. I sometimes tease her and call her a groundwater janitor). Most of the consulting firms are effective youth grinders. Many people only work at these places for a few years and realize the work isn't for them, others thrive on it. If you go to work for a small but active firm you could easily find yourself doing any one of or all of the above.




I was Staff Hydrogeologist for an environmental consulting firm in Florida for some years right out of college with a BS Environmental Sciences. This company was truly a soul sucking, youth grinding place. I was salaried but would work (bill out) around 45-50 hrs per week. One time I had a really long week and realized I got paid aroud $10 per hour that week......sucked.

I worked with Engineers and Geologist and lowly scientist like myself. Engineers made 1.5 to 2 time more than geologist. Geologist made 1.5 to 2 times more than scientists. ..... hell the technicians made more than me cause they got overtime. I never want to see another Soil Vapor Extraction or Air Sparge system again. We did contamination assessment and remediation for the retail petroleum industry and the state DEP and DOT.

GET A PE .... it will be worth it in the long run.

BTW.... I moved on to the Safety side of things and now have a great job doing Environmental Health and Safety (EHS). Little mix of all things
Link Posted: 2/1/2011 11:35:51 AM EDT
[#25]
Man, that sucks... to be so close to finishing your degree (to move towards your masters and doctorate) then realize you may have chosen the wrong field.

Consider something...

Finish your current degree and get a job using it. Sign on with a company that works in the field you're wanting to explore as an intern... see if you really like it.

Math is math. I suck at it but a good tutor helps.

Link Posted: 2/1/2011 11:54:03 AM EDT
[#26]



I work for a local government agency, and my duties include investigating environmental crimes such as water pollution, illegal dumping, fish kills, and the like. It's not a bad job, and I'm frequently in the field –– which sucks on cold days like today.





You can get a decent water-related job without having to go the engineering route, although that will likely pay you more. As others have pointed out, much of your coursework isn't going to directly translate over into real life.





If you're really interested in the geosciences field you need to tailor your program to include hydrology and groundwater courses, along with some environmental remediation and instrumentation courses.





And one thing I cannot emphasize enough is take plenty of CHEMISTRY, at least three years: One year of basic chem, one of organic chem, and one of analysis/sampling/instrumentation. If there's one thing most civil engineers don't know sh*t about, it's chemistry.





I don't know about the programs you mention, but a good BS in geology/hydrology with a strong minor in chemistry should get you the kind of job you're interested in. But, unfortunately, be prepared for at least 2-3 more years of school.



ETA:  Ironically, just a half hour after I posted this I got called out on a diesel spill.  And yes, it was cold as a m___r f____r.









 
Link Posted: 2/1/2011 11:55:42 AM EDT
[#27]
I took a hydrology course in college in relation to my Forest Management studies. Had a Chinese professor and I never understood 5 words he said all semester. Thank god he reused old test from past semesters.



I know a few people who specialized in that area and they do pretty well doing wetland delianation, but I couldn't go around fucking landowners like that.
Link Posted: 2/1/2011 12:18:07 PM EDT
[#28]




Quoted:

I took a hydrology course in college in relation to my Forest Management studies. Had a Chinese professor and I never understood 5 words he said all semester. Thank god he reused old test from past semesters.



I know a few people who specialized in that area and they do pretty well doing wetland delianation, but I couldn't go around fucking landowners like that.


did you go to tarleton state?  xixi wang?  that's one of the programs i'm considering.



thanks to everyone for the input.  this thread is a trove!
Link Posted: 2/1/2011 12:30:19 PM EDT
[#29]
I think Chinese professors are the norm in hydrology these days.

I had Ho for stats (undergrad) "First you draw a horontal line",   Yu for Advanced hydrology (focused on modeling), and Hu for geostats.

They were all good guys but sometime hard to understand.
Link Posted: 2/1/2011 12:38:55 PM EDT
[#30]




Quoted:

I think Chinese professors are the norm in hydrology these days.



I had Ho for stats (undergrad) "First you draw a horontal line", Yu for Advanced hydrology (focused on modeling), and Hu for geostats.



They were all good guys but sometime hard to understand.








i have liu for stats: "central tendency meayurement."



from day 1 of class:  "openly mocking teacher pronunciation of english words will have negative impact on grade."
Link Posted: 2/1/2011 12:45:23 PM EDT
[#31]

Enviro field arfcommers, PM me your contact info for work, including the company name.  



I'm kinda the marketing guy for my company (which is small) as well as the emergency response guy.  On occasion, we need locals to areas we're not local to.  I'll put you in my OMGWTFBBQ file of people who might be able to scramble for me.

Link Posted: 2/1/2011 12:57:16 PM EDT
[#32]



Quoted:



Enviro field arfcommers, PM me your contact info for work, including the company name.  




I'm kinda the marketing guy for my company (which is small) as well as the emergency response guy.  On occasion, we need locals to areas we're not local to.  I'll put you in my OMGWTFBBQ file of people who might be able to scramble for me.





Tag for when im in front of a computer.



 
Link Posted: 2/1/2011 1:20:16 PM EDT
[#33]
Link Posted: 2/1/2011 1:22:08 PM EDT
[#34]
Quoted:

Quoted:
I think Chinese professors are the norm in hydrology these days.

I had Ho for stats (undergrad) "First you draw a horontal line", Yu for Advanced hydrology (focused on modeling), and Hu for geostats.

They were all good guys but sometime hard to understand.




i have liu for stats: "central tendency meayurement."

from day 1 of class:  "openly mocking teacher pronunciation of english words will have negative impact on grade."


Ho was the funniest one, on the first day of class he said "If anyone is having a problem understanding me, please speak up now" the class was silent. "Nobody ever says anything on the first day, but after the midterm its always 'but I couldn't understand anything you said'"
Link Posted: 2/1/2011 1:27:00 PM EDT
[#35]
Hydrology and hydraulics can be a whole new sexual experience.

It can be very math and science intensive.  Just as much as structural engineering or electrical.

I went BS in Civil Engineering with Hydraulics/Hydrology/Water Resources emphasis.  Probably one of the more difficult aspects is articulating to a general audience what exactly is it you do.

Link Posted: 2/1/2011 1:30:49 PM EDT
[#36]



Quoted:

 Probably one of the more difficult aspects is articulating to a general audience what exactly is it you do.









Bullshit.  







"We go outside, hike around a bit, and then drink a lot of beer while we discuss hiking around."  Really, not that hard to articulate if you ask me.










 
Link Posted: 2/1/2011 3:15:17 PM EDT
[#37]
Quoted:

Quoted:
 Probably one of the more difficult aspects is articulating to a general audience what exactly is it you do.




Bullshit.  




"We go outside, hike around a bit, and then drink a lot of beer while we discuss hiking around."  Really, not that hard to articulate if you ask me.





 


Did someone say beer!?
Link Posted: 2/1/2011 4:04:50 PM EDT
[#38]

Quick update while we're on the topic.








Anyone looking for a high stress, low pay entry level position in this field?  Our Vacaville, CA office just got an opening, starting immediately.  PM me for details if you're interested.  Mostly field flunky work, with some office.  Full time with bennies.







/Bennies does not include living in CA, as that is not a bennie in my book.

Link Posted: 2/1/2011 4:50:43 PM EDT
[#39]
Quoted:

And one thing I cannot emphasize enough is take plenty of CHEMISTRY, at least three years: One year of basic chem, one of organic chem, and one of analysis/sampling/instrumentation. If there's one thing most civil engineers don't know sh*t about, it's chemistry.





No shit.  Klepped out of Chem 1 due to high school credits, then picked up Chem 2 (Chem 1 lab) my first semester, and I though I was done.  Few years later I'm taking EnvEng 312 Indoor Air Pollution and I'm going, "WTF? Stoichiometry, Avogadro's Number, moles?  I don't remember this crap!"  Yeah, class was rough for the first couple of weeks till I got back in the hang of it.
Link Posted: 2/1/2011 5:07:19 PM EDT
[#40]
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