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Posted: 1/18/2015 1:06:58 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/18/2015 1:53:57 PM EST by DetrhoytMAK]
Short background: We live in an older suburban neighborhood that appears to be on the decline. Many of the houses in the neighborhood are becoming rental units, and the condo/apartment complex next to our neighborhod is slowly becoming Sec. 8 housing.
I would probably have to put quite a bit of work into the house to get it where we could either sell it for profit or turn it into a rental unit. Our current mortgage is far less than what we could get in rent for the place, but again, I'd have to spend the cash or put in the work to bring the house up to rentable condition. We are confident we could get at least what we owe if we sell it as is, but it would likely be a long, drawn out affair as I doubt it would sell quickly.

That said, my credit is awesome and we make a pretty decent income as far as working stiffs go. We could easily purchase another home out in the country, where we've always wanted to be, and still continue to make the payment on our current home. Of course, I'd rather not go through the hassle of owning two homes and/or becoming a landlord.

I'd like to hear from those of you who have walked away from their home in order to move to another home. What was it like, and would you do it again if you had it to do over?
Link Posted: 1/18/2015 1:08:45 PM EST
Damn the contract you signed.
Link Posted: 1/18/2015 1:11:05 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By skierbri10:
Damn the contract you signed.
View Quote

does losing the house fit in that contract ?


technically they are living up to the contract .. no ?
Link Posted: 1/18/2015 1:13:18 PM EST
Originally Posted By DetrhoytMAK:
That said, my credit is awesome ........
View Quote
It is right now but ........

Originally Posted By DetrhoytMAK:
I'd like to hear from those of you who have walked away from their home in order to move to another home. What was it like, and would you do it again if you had it to do over?
View Quote

You credit will go down the tubes if you just walk away.

What about doing a short sale ..... talk to your lender.
MAYBE .... and I have no idea if this will work.
Talk to a lender ..... do a short sale on the old home, roll the loss over into the new mortgage. ( assuming there is enough value up front )

Good luck in whatever you do ...... but I think buying a new home, walking away from the old is a bad idea.



.


Link Posted: 1/18/2015 1:13:29 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By refarmed1900mhz:

does losing the house fit in that contract ?


technically they are living up to the contract .. no ?
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Originally Posted By refarmed1900mhz:
Originally Posted By skierbri10:
Damn the contract you signed.

does losing the house fit in that contract ?


technically they are living up to the contract .. no ?


They are up until they walk away from it.


Link Posted: 1/18/2015 1:14:37 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Bud:


They are up until they walk away from it.


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Originally Posted By Bud:
Originally Posted By refarmed1900mhz:
Originally Posted By skierbri10:
Damn the contract you signed.

does losing the house fit in that contract ?


technically they are living up to the contract .. no ?


They are up until they walk away from it.





doesnt the contract say you dont pay we take the house back?

its a secured loan after all




Link Posted: 1/18/2015 1:14:45 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By refarmed1900mhz:

does losing the house fit in that contract ?


technically they are living up to the contract .. no ?
View Quote View All Quotes
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By refarmed1900mhz:
Originally Posted By skierbri10:
Damn the contract you signed.

does losing the house fit in that contract ?


technically they are living up to the contract .. no ?

No, they're suffering the penalty for not living up to the contract
Link Posted: 1/18/2015 1:17:53 PM EST
Doesn't sound like you're at that point yet. Sounds like you'd be better off selling, even if it's below market value. Price it so it will sell.
Link Posted: 1/18/2015 1:18:26 PM EST
This thread wil not go well for Teh OP.
Link Posted: 1/18/2015 1:26:58 PM EST
Why would you walk away when you could sell it for what you owe on it. Sometimes the right thing to do is not the easiest.
Link Posted: 1/18/2015 1:28:22 PM EST
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Originally Posted By sel366:
This thread wil not go well for Teh OP.
View Quote


Eh, whatever, this is GD. Chances are half the ones that might begrudge the act of walking away from a home have never owned a home.

As someone aready mentioned, the contract I signed says if I don't make the payments, they take the house back. That's how a secured loan works. I'm not worried about the bank, if anything I'm worried about the neighbors we'd leave behind having an empty foreclosed house on the block.

There is an extremely low chance of this happening, but nonetheless I thought I'd get some advice and thoughts based on experience from those who have made a similar move. That's all.
Link Posted: 1/18/2015 1:28:36 PM EST
I would just sell. Why burn the credit if you dont have to? Just in case...
Link Posted: 1/18/2015 1:30:26 PM EST
Know anyone who likes to play with fire?
Link Posted: 1/18/2015 1:39:22 PM EST
If you don't have a need to buy a car or any other loans for the next 7-10 years, are ok with your "excellent credit" dropping into the 300-400 range, go for it.

Oh, and be ready when the IRS knocks on your door looking for the taxable value of the home you walked away from .
Link Posted: 1/18/2015 1:42:38 PM EST
Why would you walk away from a house you could sell for what you owe or more?

I lived in a neighborhood that was literally turning Section 8 all around me, but I owed more than what the house was worth. I ended up doing a short sale to get away from the area. Was completely worth it. Very little out of pocket expenses, and my credit was barely affected. I was able to get a car loan a year later.
Link Posted: 1/18/2015 1:49:46 PM EST
If you can afford to carry both mortgages just rent the old one out unless the house is really kicked to shit you could probably rent it as is with some fresh carpet and paint
Link Posted: 1/18/2015 1:53:02 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Tweek218:
Why would you walk away from a house you could sell for what you owe or more?

I lived in a neighborhood that was literally turning Section 8 all around me, but I owed more than what the house was worth. I ended up doing a short sale to get away from the area. Was completely worth it. Very little out of pocket expenses, and my credit was barely affected. I was able to get a car loan a year later.
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Like I said, I'm thinking it would be a while before it sold. If we're gonna move, I'd like it to be in time to get the kids enrolled before the next school year and not during the next school year. Believe me, I totally see what you're saying here and simply walking away would be highly unlikely, but again, I want to get the info just to be prepared for worst case scenario.

Would you mind giving me a quick summary on how a short sale works?
Link Posted: 1/18/2015 1:54:55 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By cancer-stix:
If you don't have a need to buy a car or any other loans for the next 7-10 years, are ok with your "excellent credit" dropping into the 300-400 range, go for it.

Oh, and be ready when the IRS knocks on your door looking for the taxable value of the home you walked away from .
View Quote



This, And walking away is a selfish plan. They need to bring back debtors prison. If you find you have no way what so ever to pay back money owed that is one thing . But to stick someone just because you can and don't want to pay deserves jail.
Link Posted: 1/18/2015 1:58:30 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Flyer5:



This, And walking away is a selfish plan. They need to bring back debtors prison. If you find you have no way what so ever to pay back money owed that is one thing . But to stick someone just because you can and don't want to pay deserves jail.
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Originally Posted By Flyer5:
Originally Posted By cancer-stix:
If you don't have a need to buy a car or any other loans for the next 7-10 years, are ok with your "excellent credit" dropping into the 300-400 range, go for it.

Oh, and be ready when the IRS knocks on your door looking for the taxable value of the home you walked away from .



This, And walking away is a selfish plan. They need to bring back debtors prison. If you find you have no way what so ever to pay back money owed that is one thing . But to stick someone just because you can and don't want to pay deserves jail.


Secured loan, look into it.

The bank would still be paid, in the form of the house they get back as collateral. Not a difficult concept. The penalty on my end would be a huge hit to my credit. That's how it works.
Link Posted: 1/18/2015 2:05:39 PM EST
Originally Posted By DetrhoytMAK:
Short background: We live in an older suburban neighborhood that appears to be on the decline. Many of the houses in the neighborhood are becoming rental units, and the condo/apartment complex next to our neighborhod is slowly becoming Sec. 8 housing.
I would probably have to put quite a bit of work into the house to get it where we could either sell it for profit or turn it into a rental unit. Our current mortgage is far less than what we could get in rent for the place, but again, I'd have to spend the cash or put in the work to bring the house up to rentable condition. We are confident we could get at least what we owe if we sell it as is, but it would likely be a long, drawn out affair as I doubt it would sell quickly.

That said, my credit is awesome and we make a pretty decent income as far as working stiffs go. We could easily purchase another home out in the country, where we've always wanted to be, and still continue to make the payment on our current home. Of course, I'd rather not go through the hassle of owning two homes and/or becoming a landlord.

I'd like to hear from those of you who have walked away from their home in order to move to another home. What was it like, and would you do it again if you had it to do over?
View Quote



Whoever holds your mortgage isn't going to let you just walk away. Your credit will be destroyed, you will end up paying what you owe plus attorney fees and court costs.

Link Posted: 1/18/2015 2:09:23 PM EST
That's not how it works. There is a lot more to it then the bank simply taking the house back and you being dinged on credit.

What do you owe compared to what it is worth? Short sale may not even be an option. And if ut is, the IRS will tax you as extra income on the difference.
Link Posted: 1/18/2015 2:11:49 PM EST
Quit looking at real estate as some structure built by somebodies with a "General Contractor" who only tells you his name is "Bill"

Location is EVERYTHING.

Yesterdays slum is the model community of TODAY.
Link Posted: 1/18/2015 2:11:56 PM EST
You own and live in a house that isn't rentable?
Link Posted: 1/18/2015 2:14:26 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/18/2015 2:23:00 PM EST by Boom_Stick]
I'm in your position except we are a tad upside down. I'm currently making improvments; built an attic, epoxied garage floor and built work bench with shelves/storage and new electric and plugs. Building a new fence, installing a stone patio and upgrading the floors to wood. It'll take about a year but should be able to sell for what its worth, get out from under it and re-use my GI loan for a new place.
Walking away or short selling would ruin your credit.
Link Posted: 1/18/2015 2:14:38 PM EST
OP is the reason why people now have to pay thousands of dollars in mortgage insurance when buying something.

You could, I don't know, man up and sell your house and than buy what you wanted elsewhere?

Just a thought.
Link Posted: 1/18/2015 2:16:42 PM EST
Good luck on getting the mortgage for the second house at any kind of a decent interest rate. You don't think the banks are onto the kind of scheme you're dreaming of? Better yet, you think you're the first to try?
Link Posted: 1/18/2015 2:16:51 PM EST
A friend did this about 2 years ago.
He said his PMI covered pretty much everything, that wasn't covered by the short sale. He said he wouldn't have done it if he didn't have pmi.
Link Posted: 1/18/2015 2:21:15 PM EST
instead of guessing at the value of the house have an appraiser come out and take a look at it.


you can also do a lease management company where you pay them X for them to collect rent and maintain the property. so maybe you make $40/month off the place but you don't take a beating.
Link Posted: 1/18/2015 2:21:45 PM EST
The bank will sell the house for way less than the balance of the mortgage then sue you for the difference plus fees. And they'll win.
Link Posted: 1/18/2015 2:23:35 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Linkon:



Whoever holds your mortgage isn't going to let you just walk away. Your credit will be destroyed, you will end up paying what you owe plus attorney fees and court costs.

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Originally Posted By Linkon:
Originally Posted By DetrhoytMAK:
Short background: We live in an older suburban neighborhood that appears to be on the decline. Many of the houses in the neighborhood are becoming rental units, and the condo/apartment complex next to our neighborhod is slowly becoming Sec. 8 housing.
I would probably have to put quite a bit of work into the house to get it where we could either sell it for profit or turn it into a rental unit. Our current mortgage is far less than what we could get in rent for the place, but again, I'd have to spend the cash or put in the work to bring the house up to rentable condition. We are confident we could get at least what we owe if we sell it as is, but it would likely be a long, drawn out affair as I doubt it would sell quickly.

That said, my credit is awesome and we make a pretty decent income as far as working stiffs go. We could easily purchase another home out in the country, where we've always wanted to be, and still continue to make the payment on our current home. Of course, I'd rather not go through the hassle of owning two homes and/or becoming a landlord.

I'd like to hear from those of you who have walked away from their home in order to move to another home. What was it like, and would you do it again if you had it to do over?



Whoever holds your mortgage isn't going to let you just walk away. Your credit will be destroyed, you will end up paying what you owe plus attorney fees and court costs.

That's why you hire an attorney that deals in Short Sales. A good friend and co-worker of mine sold his 4 2 1/2 this way. It was just him and his daughter in it for many years. Once she moved out after high school, he could no longer justify the payments for a single person. S. Florida was hit especially hard during the housing bubble and his home was no different than the rest. The loss in value was enormous.

He hired a reputable firm to handle his short sale and his home was gone in no time. Stress free transaction and a credit score back to 790 in less than 12 months.
Link Posted: 1/18/2015 2:33:22 PM EST
I busted my ass and carried a $2000/month house for 5 years, just so I wouldn't have to do that.

Thought about jingle mailing the keys many times, and also hoped it would burn down accidentally.

In the end, I sold it for a slight profit, and it was one of the happiest days of my life.

Despite the world we live in going to shit, you have to be true to your ideals.


Having morals might actually be a negative characteristic in todays environment. If you have none, then bail out and don't look back. Cleaning up your shit is hard to do and time consuming. Better to get others to do it for you.
Link Posted: 1/18/2015 2:48:12 PM EST
don't be a dirtbag... sell it for what you can get for it, rent it for what you can get for it, or stay there..
Link Posted: 1/18/2015 2:50:06 PM EST
OP, your thinking is fucked.

Why would you walk away from an asset?

Fix it up, and outsource the landlord shit to a property management company. Rent it out for enough to cover the mortgage payment + PM fee, and have a small profit each month so you can recoup the repair costs in a year or so.

You end up with a property that continues to provide you with money every month, and don't wreck your credit in the process.
Link Posted: 1/18/2015 2:52:47 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/18/2015 2:57:14 PM EST by gammaecho22]
I lived in a house in Florida I considered doing it with for a while as I simply didn't know if the market would ever come back. I didn't buy at the top, but the market was just going to the floor for a while and eventually bounced back. We were also worried that since a lot of people just left, that the area could slowly turn into Section 8 and/or low rent ghetto. I know how you feel about wishing for fire/hurricane/earthquake swallowing the house.

I ended up renting it, found a fantastic no hassles renter and am just going to either sell it to them or put it on the market when it hits my 'get the fuck out of this' price and then never speak of it again.

What you're considering is what a lot of people did before the housing bubble hit. When everyone was flipping houses or thinking their $150k house was worth $600k all of a sudden, some would get it appraised, pull the max out in cash on a home equity loan and then buy a new house somewhere else and just leave. They literally borrowed 5x what their house was worth, against the bubble equity in the house, and walked away. Only thing that happened would be horrible credit until it fell off, and if the mortgage company sold your home at auction the difference was still due from you, and if discharged/forgiven by them instead it was not taxable to you via the IRS. So if you could live with that....

Problem for you is, you simply want another mortgage which isn't guaranteed to not put you in the same situation. I'd just rent it or sell it and be done. The 8+ years of bullshit following a foreclosure for not doing minimal work to sell/rent isn't worth it.
Link Posted: 1/18/2015 2:54:57 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By DetrhoytMAK:


Secured loan, look into it.

The bank would still be paid, in the form of the house they get back as collateral. Not a difficult concept. The penalty on my end would be a huge hit to my credit. That's how it works.
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Originally Posted By DetrhoytMAK:
Originally Posted By Flyer5:
Originally Posted By cancer-stix:
If you don't have a need to buy a car or any other loans for the next 7-10 years, are ok with your "excellent credit" dropping into the 300-400 range, go for it.

Oh, and be ready when the IRS knocks on your door looking for the taxable value of the home you walked away from .



This, And walking away is a selfish plan. They need to bring back debtors prison. If you find you have no way what so ever to pay back money owed that is one thing . But to stick someone just because you can and don't want to pay deserves jail.


Secured loan, look into it.

The bank would still be paid, in the form of the house they get back as collateral. Not a difficult concept. The penalty on my end would be a huge hit to my credit. That's how it works.

If you were in fact living up to the terms of your agreement, why would that be a hit to your credit? There's a clue here somewhere...
Link Posted: 1/18/2015 2:59:37 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/18/2015 3:01:35 PM EST by Huffskies]
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Originally Posted By Hacker:
The bank will sell the house for way less than the balance of the mortgage then sue you for the difference plus fees. And they'll win.
View Quote


I hope they do.

ETA: enjoy the lien on your new home.
Link Posted: 1/18/2015 3:00:18 PM EST
There are plenty of people who buy homes just like your so they can fix them and rent them out, no reason to lose the money and your credit. Just walking away would be the height of lazy and stupid imo.
Link Posted: 1/18/2015 3:07:34 PM EST
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Originally Posted By FredMan:

No, they're suffering the penalty for not living up to the contract
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Originally Posted By FredMan:
Originally Posted By refarmed1900mhz:
Originally Posted By skierbri10:
Damn the contract you signed.

does losing the house fit in that contract ?


technically they are living up to the contract .. no ?

No, they're suffering the penalty for not living up to the contract


don't be ridiculous--a "penalty" is merely an additional fee. in the marketplace, right and wrong are a matter of fees.

forfeiture of collateral isn't a punishment, because a private firm is not authorized to punish you. seizing collateral is merely the creditor recouping borrowed but un-remitted wealth. claiming the collateral cancels the debt. and if the value of the collateral exceeds the debt, the creditor has actually profited. a party that profits from a transaction can hardly be said to be 'aggrieved'.

that said, i think it's foolish to simply abandon an asset. strikes me as laziness that the homeowner will come to regret later.
Link Posted: 1/18/2015 3:09:50 PM EST
i tried to get my stepbrother to.

he bought during the bubble in FL.

like 2 years later the house across the st came up for half what he owed and was bigger and nicer, i said go buy it and then send your bank the old keys, fuck your credit for a few years but you would save so much money.
Link Posted: 1/18/2015 3:14:28 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/18/2015 3:16:40 PM EST by Dino]
its called a strategic default and its common.

Do what makes financial sense to you; don't worry about what the GiDiots think of your decision.

You'd be better off asking a financial counselor rather than GD.


Link Posted: 1/18/2015 3:19:18 PM EST
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Originally Posted By DetrhoytMAK:


Like I said, I'm thinking it would be a while before it sold. If we're gonna move, I'd like it to be in time to get the kids enrolled before the next school year and not during the next school year. Believe me, I totally see what you're saying here and simply walking away would be highly unlikely, but again, I want to get the info just to be prepared for worst case scenario.

Would you mind giving me a quick summary on how a short sale works?
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Originally Posted By DetrhoytMAK:
Originally Posted By Tweek218:
Why would you walk away from a house you could sell for what you owe or more?

I lived in a neighborhood that was literally turning Section 8 all around me, but I owed more than what the house was worth. I ended up doing a short sale to get away from the area. Was completely worth it. Very little out of pocket expenses, and my credit was barely affected. I was able to get a car loan a year later.


Like I said, I'm thinking it would be a while before it sold. If we're gonna move, I'd like it to be in time to get the kids enrolled before the next school year and not during the next school year. Believe me, I totally see what you're saying here and simply walking away would be highly unlikely, but again, I want to get the info just to be prepared for worst case scenario.

Would you mind giving me a quick summary on how a short sale works?


From what you said, it sounds like you let the house go into disrepair. Man up, fix it so it will sell and sell it for what you owe on it. I hope you dont do the same with your new home.
Link Posted: 1/18/2015 3:19:52 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/18/2015 3:21:38 PM EST by rfm05]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By DetrhoytMAK:


Secured loan, look into it.

The bank would still be paid, in the form of the house they get back as collateral. Not a difficult concept. The penalty on my end would be a huge hit to my credit. That's how it works.
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Originally Posted By DetrhoytMAK:
Originally Posted By Flyer5:



Secured loan, look into it.

The bank would still be paid, in the form of the house they get back as collateral. Not a difficult concept. The penalty on my end would be a huge hit to my credit. That's how it works.
Ever heard of a deficiency Judgement? The bank will come after you via lawsuit for a deficiency should the home sell at auction for less than is owed on the mortgage. That's actually how it works, bro. So your credit will be trashed, and you'll probably still owe the bank some money, or you will owe the IRS if the bank doesn't sue you for the deficiency.
Link Posted: 1/18/2015 3:20:47 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/18/2015 3:21:11 PM EST by dmfl54]
I would just sell and get what you can, just do the minimum work to the place.
The new owner might not care about any work you would or wouldn't do.
Link Posted: 1/18/2015 3:21:10 PM EST

You wouldn't be the first Arfcommer to do it.
Link Posted: 1/18/2015 3:23:43 PM EST
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Originally Posted By sel366:
This thread wil not go well for Teh OP.
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It may or may not.

You'd be shocked at how many people around here have zero integrity.
Link Posted: 1/18/2015 3:24:42 PM EST
Get a property management company. House needn't be perfect. Don't trash your credit and get garnished over it.
Link Posted: 1/18/2015 3:25:50 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/18/2015 3:26:20 PM EST by bassackwards]
The bank will foreclose on you then auction it for whatever they can get and come after you for the deficit.

They can do that.
Link Posted: 1/18/2015 3:28:05 PM EST
I've often thought of doing the same thing.

For the "you signed the contract crowd":
The contract I signed did not include a future of criminals being financed to move into the neighborhood. Maybe the bank (who now owns many of the houses) should not be letting all those houses they now own to deteriorate.

Maybe they shouldn't have loaned money that contributed to the decline of once nice, safe, and previously neighborhoods.

I blame the bank and don't give 2 fucks about what others think about my "contract"

I haven't done it yet but it's always on the back of my mind as an option.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 1/18/2015 3:39:40 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Tweek218:
Why would you walk away from a house you could sell for what you owe or more?

I lived in a neighborhood that was literally turning Section 8 all around me, but I owed more than what the house was worth. I ended up doing a short sale to get away from the area. Was completely worth it. Very little out of pocket expenses, and my credit was barely affected. I was able to get a car loan a year later.
View Quote

Houses aren't selling. Nobody wants to buy houses in a declining area. Kids are renting out houses left by deceased parents because nobody wants to buy them.

Why would somebody knowingly obligate themselves to live in a declining area. Especially when there are freshly built homes they are trying to sell.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 1/18/2015 3:44:02 PM EST


MUH integrity!

MUH morals!

Be a man!

OP is what's wrong with 'merica!

Fuckin reatrds.
Link Posted: 1/18/2015 3:48:58 PM EST
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Originally Posted By phb1gt:


MUH integrity!

MUH morals!

Be a man!

OP is what's wrong with 'merica!

Fuckin reatrds.
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Your extra chromosone is showing.
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