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Posted: 4/15/2006 2:41:21 PM EST
I was just thinking how fun and challenging it'd be to learn how to use the English longbow accurately at ranges of like 150-200 yards. Not for hunting or anything, just target-shooting. Anyone do anything like that?
Link Posted: 4/15/2006 6:16:58 PM EST
Link Posted: 4/15/2006 6:19:28 PM EST
I found this place, sells simple long bows for $75

www.desertdogarchery.com/products.php?cat=1
Link Posted: 4/15/2006 6:28:44 PM EST
Shot a long bow growing up. It was a lot of fun. I have a son now that is 12yrs old and can out shoot most adults. He has a compound though. I say go for it!!
Link Posted: 4/15/2006 6:32:23 PM EST

Watch out for your inner forearm. My first time out with a bow I ended up with a gigantic bruise for letting the string ride my left arm all the way down. That was with a relatively weak bow - maybe a 35lbs draw. A lesson I only needed to be taught once.

Link Posted: 4/15/2006 6:40:35 PM EST
If you have the time and tools - build your own...
archive.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=1&f=5&t=415315

It's great fun!
Link Posted: 4/15/2006 6:48:11 PM EST
[Last Edit: 4/15/2006 6:48:48 PM EST by Cahill]
You guys that are interested, here's how to get your feet wet.

Read the book 'Hunting With The Bow and Arrow' by Saxton Pope (Pope & Young)

It's a great read and is considered one of the books of the Archer's Bible.
Saxton Pope, one of the fore-fathers of modern achery, takes you on a journey of archery back in the early 20th century. This is a very informative and captivating read. Anybody with an interest in archery will find this book hard to lay down.
Pope begins with the story of the last Yana indian, Ishi, which he became close friends with. He speaks of Ishi's equipment and his methods, and their adventures together. Fasinating!!!

He then explains how to make and use the archery equipment which he and his comrades, Art Young and Will Compton, used on their many excursions.

These excursions are then written about in detail in a manner which carries you back into the early 1900's!! Many of these adventures, such as lion and bear hunting, had never before been undertaken by modern bowhunters, and an air of uncertanity existed. In one story a charging grizzly is stopped just a few steps away!!! Awsome!!! You'll have to read it to find out more!!!
Link Posted: 4/15/2006 6:50:21 PM EST
My son is an NAA archer and just finished a shoot . He's ranked 49th in the country . maxx
Link Posted: 4/15/2006 6:51:24 PM EST
Not into hunting. Just into the skill and the heritage and history aspect.
Link Posted: 4/15/2006 6:52:51 PM EST
Yeah, I shoot a stick bow (although I haven't tried any real long range.)

I don't need no stinking training wheels on my bows!



Yeah, I finished it with a pair of rattlesnake skins. The picture really doesn't do it justice.
Link Posted: 4/15/2006 6:53:06 PM EST
Get the Traditional Bowyers Bible vol 1. Has an entire chapter on how to build an ELB. Want to build one myself but a stave of Yew is over $100. Shows a guy in there with a 100+ lb draw ELB. I can hear my ligaments breaking already if I drew that thing!
Link Posted: 4/15/2006 6:54:00 PM EST
Sounds like fun.
Link Posted: 4/15/2006 6:54:45 PM EST

Originally Posted By John Parker:
Get the Traditional Bowyers Bible vol 1. Has an entire chapter on how to build an ELB. Want to build one myself but a stave of Yew is over $100. Shows a guy in there with a 100+ lb draw ELB. I can hear my ligaments breaking already if I drew that thing!



Link , contact?
Link Posted: 4/15/2006 6:55:59 PM EST

Originally Posted By Cahill:
You guys that are interested, here's how to get your feet wet.

Read the book 'Hunting With The Bow and Arrow' by Saxton Pope (Pope & Young)

It's a great read and is considered one of the books of the Archer's Bible.
Saxton Pope, one of the fore-fathers of modern achery, takes you on a journey of archery back in the early 20th century. This is a very informative and captivating read. Anybody with an interest in archery will find this book hard to lay down.
Pope begins with the story of the last Yana indian, Ishi, which he became close friends with. He speaks of Ishi's equipment and his methods, and their adventures together. Fasinating!!!

He then explains how to make and use the archery equipment which he and his comrades, Art Young and Will Compton, used on their many excursions.

These excursions are then written about in detail in a manner which carries you back into the early 1900's!! Many of these adventures, such as lion and bear hunting, had never before been undertaken by modern bowhunters, and an air of uncertanity existed. In one story a charging grizzly is stopped just a few steps away!!! Awsome!!! You'll have to read it to find out more!!!



Thanks, great lead/resource to pursue.
Link Posted: 4/15/2006 6:58:35 PM EST
[Last Edit: 4/15/2006 7:05:23 PM EST by StealthyBlagga]
Shooting an English Longbow at 150-200yds closely replicates its application on the pre-gunpowder battlefields of Europe (Crecy, Agincourt etc.). In England there is a sport called Clout Shooting where a flag is placed out in the 100yd+ range and the archers shoot up into the air, trying to drop their arrow as close as possible to the flag.

I used to shoot a lot of field/3D archery in England, but I always shot a compound. I have no idea if Clout Shooting is available in the US. Maybe try Google ?
Link Posted: 4/15/2006 6:59:43 PM EST
When you get good, don't forget to buy a pair of green tights!
Link Posted: 4/15/2006 7:01:19 PM EST
[Last Edit: 4/15/2006 7:03:57 PM EST by raven]

Originally Posted By StealthyBlagga:
Shooting an English Longbow at 150-200yds closely replicates its application on the pre-gunpowder battlefields of Europe (Crecy, Agincourt etc.). In England there is a sport called Clout Shooting where a flag is placed out in the 100yd+ range and the archers shoot jup into the air, trying to drop their arrow as close as possible to the flag.



Hahaha yes, that's the prime mover of my interest. I want to be as good as those guys, to see what it took to do what they did, and be so effective for England in war.
Link Posted: 4/15/2006 7:06:06 PM EST
Traditional archery is every bit as bad as black rifle disease, one thing about TAD is that I can practice it every day in my back yard, in town.

Now, the 150-200 yard thing is a bit much to bite off, but it's neat watching your arrow zoom off into the distance. Realistically, you're looking at under 40 yds for any decent accuracy, and that'll have to be worked on.

Have fun with it, here's a couple of links:

Tradgang.com

The Leatherwall
Link Posted: 4/15/2006 7:08:59 PM EST
[Last Edit: 4/15/2006 7:09:44 PM EST by raven]
I'm not interested in hunting, I'm not interested in close-range accuracy.

I am interested in hitting man-sized targets at long range with English long bows.
Link Posted: 4/15/2006 7:12:24 PM EST
[Last Edit: 4/15/2006 7:20:06 PM EST by S30V]

Originally Posted By raven:
I was just thinking how fun and challenging it'd be to learn how to use the English longbow accurately at ranges of like 150-200 yards. Not for hunting or anything, just target-shooting. Anyone do anything like that?



200 yards? I really like your posts, but this is a funny one.

ETA: Skills with a bow at reasonable ranges is one thing (See the legend of Robin Hood), but you're talking of distances where the accuracy that I think you seek simply does not exist. Sure they used bows at long ranges in battles of yore, but that always involved massed groups of archers. With those kinds of numbers, as long as you can get the range, you only need to be accurate within a few meters, plus one or two more, as the sheer number of arrows was the key to victory with this strategy.
Link Posted: 4/15/2006 7:14:29 PM EST
[Last Edit: 4/15/2006 7:22:45 PM EST by raven]

Originally Posted By S30V:

Originally Posted By raven:
I was just thinking how fun and challenging it'd be to learn how to use the English longbow accurately at ranges of like 150-200 yards. Not for hunting or anything, just target-shooting. Anyone do anything like that?



200 yards? I really like your posts, but this is a funny one.



Unrealistic? I am not into shooting arrows, more into guns.

I dont know anything really abou archery, 200 yards doesn't seem too far for me as a shooter.
Link Posted: 4/15/2006 7:20:29 PM EST
[Last Edit: 4/15/2006 7:23:50 PM EST by DanR]

Originally Posted By raven:
I'm not interested in hunting, I'm not interested in close-range accuracy.

I am interested in hitting man-sized targets at long range with English long bows.



Well with practice, I suppose anything can be done. But bear in mind, in those days it was a bazillion arrows shot from a whole bunch of archers that got the job done, no one guy really aimed for another at those ranges. It's still a blast to fling them a long ways, you should try straight up.
Link Posted: 4/15/2006 7:27:54 PM EST

Originally Posted By raven:

Originally Posted By S30V:

Originally Posted By raven:
I was just thinking how fun and challenging it'd be to learn how to use the English longbow accurately at ranges of like 150-200 yards. Not for hunting or anything, just target-shooting. Anyone do anything like that?



200 yards? I really like your posts, but this is a funny one.



Unrealistic? I am not into shooting arrows, more into guns.

I dont know anything really abou archery, 200 yards does seem too far for me as a shooter.



Well, just a tad so, no worries. If you are truly interested, you should try compounds just once to get a feel for the best possible accuracy you can hope to achieve with non-mechanical bows today. Maybe a local archery range/club has trial sessions or something? The English long was as effective as it was because of its tremendous range (in relative terms), not because of superior accuracy, although, it was fairly accurate at close ranges and could punch through any plate armor available at the time with good arrows.
Link Posted: 4/15/2006 7:31:59 PM EST
[Last Edit: 4/15/2006 7:33:01 PM EST by raven]

Originally Posted By S30V:

Originally Posted By raven:

Originally Posted By S30V:

Originally Posted By raven:
I was just thinking how fun and challenging it'd be to learn how to use the English longbow accurately at ranges of like 150-200 yards. Not for hunting or anything, just target-shooting. Anyone do anything like that?



200 yards? I really like your posts, but this is a funny one.



Unrealistic? I am not into shooting arrows, more into guns.

I dont know anything really abou archery, 200 yards does seem too far for me as a shooter.



Well, just a tad so, no worries. If you are truly interested, you should try compounds just once to get a feel for the best possible accuracy you can hope to achieve with non-mechanical bows today. Maybe a local archery range/club has trial sessions or something? The English long was as effective as it was because of its tremendous range (in relative terms), not because of superior accuracy, although, it was fairly accurate at close ranges and could punch through any plate armor available at the time with good arrows.



Modern improved bows defeats the whole point of my interest. I want to see what the long bow is all about, by first hand. I have read about it, but since I have a nice park next door, I want to try it out.
Link Posted: 4/15/2006 7:33:11 PM EST

Originally Posted By DanR:

Originally Posted By raven:
I'm not interested in hunting, I'm not interested in close-range accuracy.

I am interested in hitting man-sized targets at long range with English long bows.



Well with practice, I suppose anything can be done.



Sorry, not even the best archers with the finest longs made today can consistently nail a man-sized target at 200 yards. Yes, they are reasonably accurate for bows, especially considering the range, but that's about it. There is a good reason why muskets overtook bows, despite the fact that these bows could be fired much more quickly than the muskets. Volleyed musket fire, while still not accurate by any means, was even fiercer than hail of arrows, and soon the range and accuracy well surpassed that of the bows.
Link Posted: 4/15/2006 7:36:28 PM EST

Originally Posted By raven:

Originally Posted By S30V:

Originally Posted By raven:

Originally Posted By S30V:

Originally Posted By raven:
I was just thinking how fun and challenging it'd be to learn how to use the English longbow accurately at ranges of like 150-200 yards. Not for hunting or anything, just target-shooting. Anyone do anything like that?



200 yards? I really like your posts, but this is a funny one.



Unrealistic? I am not into shooting arrows, more into guns.

I dont know anything really abou archery, 200 yards does seem too far for me as a shooter.



Well, just a tad so, no worries. If you are truly interested, you should try compounds just once to get a feel for the best possible accuracy you can hope to achieve with non-mechanical bows today. Maybe a local archery range/club has trial sessions or something? The English long was as effective as it was because of its tremendous range (in relative terms), not because of superior accuracy, although, it was fairly accurate at close ranges and could punch through any plate armor available at the time with good arrows.



Modern improved bows defeats the whole point of my interest. I want to see what the long bow is all about, by first hand. I have read about it, but since I have a nice park next door, I want to try it out.



I only meant that as a simple test of what the best possible accuracy you can get is, because then you could see how a somewhat more inaccurate bow, like the English long, would do. And this would be at normal bow accuracy distances, so also factor in however many more yards you want and you will get a good guess at what the best possible scenario would be. Hate to break it to you, really, but you aren't going to be shooting scarescrows at 200 yards. Trust me, I wish it were possible. It can be done now and then but not consistenly and the margin of error is just too great anyway.
Link Posted: 4/15/2006 7:38:14 PM EST
Ben Franklin advocated armring the Continental Army with bows and arrows. Did you know that?
Link Posted: 4/15/2006 7:42:48 PM EST

Originally Posted By S30V:

Originally Posted By raven:

Originally Posted By S30V:

Originally Posted By raven:

Originally Posted By S30V:

Originally Posted By raven:
I was just thinking how fun and challenging it'd be to learn how to use the English longbow accurately at ranges of like 150-200 yards. Not for hunting or anything, just target-shooting. Anyone do anything like that?



200 yards? I really like your posts, but this is a funny one.



Unrealistic? I am not into shooting arrows, more into guns.

I dont know anything really abou archery, 200 yards does seem too far for me as a shooter.



Well, just a tad so, no worries. If you are truly interested, you should try compounds just once to get a feel for the best possible accuracy you can hope to achieve with non-mechanical bows today. Maybe a local archery range/club has trial sessions or something? The English long was as effective as it was because of its tremendous range (in relative terms), not because of superior accuracy, although, it was fairly accurate at close ranges and could punch through any plate armor available at the time with good arrows.



Modern improved bows defeats the whole point of my interest. I want to see what the long bow is all about, by first hand. I have read about it, but since I have a nice park next door, I want to try it out.



I only meant that as a simple test of what the best possible accuracy you can get is, because then you could see how a somewhat more inaccurate bow, like the English long, would do. And this would be at normal bow accuracy distances, so also factor in however many more yards you want and you will get a good guess at what the best possible scenario would be. Hate to break it to you, really, but you aren't going to be shooting scarescrows at 200 yards. Trust me, I wish it were possible. It can be done now and then but not consistenly and the margin of error is just too great anyway.



Hmm. Thanks for wising me up.

Still going to buy the bow though.
Link Posted: 4/16/2006 3:45:37 AM EST
[Last Edit: 4/16/2006 3:45:54 AM EST by recoiljunky]
1 name:

Byron Ferguson. Google him. This guy hits single baloons from ranges exceeding 100 yards. Of course, he also shoots aspirin out of the air too.
Link Posted: 4/16/2006 5:00:14 PM EST
Yea, Byron can really shoot - a very good example of "with practice, anything can be done", current topic at hand of course. He does live shows often, you could probably get a chance to see him, and he is more than willing to talk.

I know guys who can hit a 3D deer target out to 75-100 yds pretty regular, and I still stand by my statement that 150 - 200 could be done. It would be similar to shooting rifles 1000 yds or even a mile, most of us can't do it, but that doesn't mean it can't be done.

There is a real bad lack of energy at those ranges, your arrows hardly stick in the foam, but it is still damn impressive.
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