Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
BCM
Member Login

Site Notices
Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 5
Posted: 9/9/2013 10:05:18 AM EDT
Planning a new home with pier and beam construction.  Would like some help on site prep., soil loading, and foundation design.
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 10:08:32 AM EDT
You're going to have to provide a little more info. Proposed size, is this over water at all, type of soil, etc.
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 10:11:37 AM EDT
Step One: Get soil analysis of your home site.
Step Two: Report back here
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 10:12:16 AM EDT
Go hire a real engineer because the advice you get online will be worth what you paid for it.
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 10:12:20 AM EDT
People normally pay good money for that info but meh
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 10:14:33 AM EDT
Yeah, I agree with the consensus. Hire professionals to survey the property and design a suitable foundation to handle the loads based on the soils. Otherwise you're going to have GD help you piss in the wind.
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 10:14:53 AM EDT
Even just a general location would be better than what you've given us so far.
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 10:23:07 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Step One: Get soil analysis of your home site.
Step Two: Report back here this information to your design professional.
View Quote


Seriously. If what you're building is outside the scope of the prescriptive sections of the International Residential Code, then you need a licensed design professional.
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 11:32:33 AM EDT
Quoted:
Planning a new home with pier and beam construction.  Would like some help on site prep., soil loading, and foundation design.
View Quote



As has been said.  Find a local PE to get this done.  If the "cry once" approach applies to anything it would be foundation design and construction.
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 11:34:30 AM EDT

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
As has been said.  Find a local PE to get this done.  If the "cry once" approach applies to anything it would be foundation design and construction.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:



Quoted:

Planning a new home with pier and beam construction.  Would like some help on site prep., soil loading, and foundation design.






As has been said.  Find a local PE to get this done.  If the "cry once" approach applies to anything it would be foundation design and construction.
Hire a geotech too....

 
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 11:35:14 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:



As has been said.  Find a local PE to get this done.  If the "cry once" approach applies to anything it would be foundation design and construction.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Planning a new home with pier and beam construction.  Would like some help on site prep., soil loading, and foundation design.



As has been said.  Find a local PE to get this done.  If the "cry once" approach applies to anything it would be foundation design and construction.


This.  It's a lot cheaper to pay a PE now than to pay a PE later to fix your eff-up.
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 11:35:29 AM EDT
Thanks guys.  Soil is black clay (inorganic), which is greasy when wet and cracks open wide when dry.  I have dug 3 foot deep holes on the site, and it's clay all the way down.  Frost line is not an issue (Texas).

Land is flat with a gentle slope toward a creek about 350 feet away.  The site is above all the flood planes.

I figure I need to build the site up a foot or two.  I could use more black clay from the property (cheapest) or haul in some other material.

I'm thinking piers set in a 12' by 12' grid.  Also guestimating 3' square footings.

My main questions, at this point are:  what is a conservative soil loading (thinking 2000 PSF), and how deep do I need to go with the footings to keep the foundations stable over the year?
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 11:44:37 AM EDT
Recently licensed civil engineer, I'm going to agree with the hive that any advice you get here will not be worth hanging your home on.  You really do need to spend the money and get it professionally surveyed and designed, ESPECIALLY since from the sound of your 2nd post you are building on highly expansive black clay.  This is not something you want to hang on guesstimates or Internet experts, if you do then you will likely be repairing the foundations within 10 years and again every drought / wet cycle after that.
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 11:48:33 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 11:55:47 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Go hire a real engineer because the advice you get online will be worth what you paid for it.
View Quote



I'm a structural engineer

I have designed bridges with 12 foot tall curved steel plate girders.

I have run 100 million dollar projects

even other engineers say that I'm an annoying prick big brain


the last time somebody asked engineering advice on this forum, the advice he got was offered by somebody professing to be a civil engineer

and the advice was flat wrong to the point of being potentially deadly


don't be a fool, get the design done properly by a local engineer


Link Posted: 9/9/2013 12:02:47 PM EDT
This is not something you'd want someone's free opinion on from an internet message forum. There's way too many variables. You need soil borings and a survey and a bunch of other stuff just to figure out how to do your site prep (compaction, remove, fill, grade etc). That doens't even inlucde how deep you really need piers to go, concrete mixes etc. etc etc.
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 12:04:50 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Step One: Get soil analysis of your home site.
Step Two: Report back here
View Quote


I was gonna recommend they light the Bat-signal for you, but I didn't know if you could translate soils reports from (I think) TX.....
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 12:05:12 PM EDT
i work on very big civil project for a living and built homes for many years

you must get a licensed pe for what you are talking about

screwing around with a house is how you get killed or injured when it collapses

very bad juju in guessing

pay the cost up front is worth thousands in the backend

Link Posted: 9/9/2013 12:10:17 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Thanks guys.  Soil is black clay (inorganic), which is greasy when wet and cracks open wide when dry.  I have dug 3 foot deep holes on the site, and it's clay all the way down.  Frost line is not an issue (Texas).

Land is flat with a gentle slope toward a creek about 350 feet away.  The site is above all the flood planes.

I figure I need to build the site up a foot or two.  I could use more black clay from the property (cheapest) or haul in some other material.

I'm thinking piers set in a 12' by 12' grid.  Also guestimating 3' square footings.

My main questions, at this point are:  what is a conservative soil loading (thinking 2000 PSF), and how deep do I need to go with the footings to keep the foundations stable over the year?
View Quote


No architect or engineer worth his salt is going to tell you over the Internet how to do this. If one does, run, don't walk away.

There is way too much liability in this to offer advice unseen and over a public forum to do this.

You have to go hire someone and pay them to do it, period! Find someone local that is not only familiar with your area but also the building and local codes,that will govern the construction of,your home.

Would you want someone over this, or any other forum for that matter, to tell you how to perform heart surgery over the Internet? I doubt it.

Don't be penny wise and dollar foolish........
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 12:15:21 PM EDT
Lol at people who want professional opinions/advice for free,  and on the Internet.   Double lol.
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 12:16:47 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Go hire a real engineer because the advice you get online will be worth what you paid for it.
View Quote

and no competent engineer is going to risk his license by "stamping" some plans for you over arfcom.
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 12:20:53 PM EDT
Just ask a carpenter.
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 12:22:21 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Just ask a carpenter.
View Quote



LOL -- this.

Most states, IIRC, don't have PE requirement for designing a private home.  Commercial buildings, or multiple unit buildings yes -- but a single-family home - no.

Link Posted: 9/9/2013 12:25:44 PM EDT
Related question.  I want to remove/relocate some support beams in my attic.  What sort of professional do I look for to hire to tell me which/where to move them?  I am already on board with hiring somebody.  I just don't know if I need an architect, a structure engineer, or what.  I don't want to go with either total overkill, or someone who is just guessing.  Who is the right professional?

Thanks.   :)
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 12:27:26 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Related question.  I want to remove/relocate some support beams in my attic.  What sort of professional do I look for to hire to tell me which/where to move them?  I am already on board with hiring somebody.  I just don't know if I need an architect, a structure engineer, or what.  I don't want to go with either total overkill, or someone who is just guessing.  Who is the right professional?

Thanks.   :)
View Quote



Civil or Structural.
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 12:28:00 PM EDT
Structural engineer to give the assembly requirements and an architect to make it look good.

OP, I am happy to answer any questions offline if you would like.
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 12:31:59 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Related question.  I want to remove/relocate some support beams in my attic.  What sort of professional do I look for to hire to tell me which/where to move them?  I am already on board with hiring somebody.  I just don't know if I need an architect, a structure engineer, or what.  I don't want to go with either total overkill, or someone who is just guessing.  Who is the right professional?

Thanks.   :)
View Quote

You can hire an architect or an engineer, but the architect will probably hire an engineer. We can do the math easily enough though so you might hire an architect with an engineer on staff who will do the work, but generally architects like to avoid the liability.

So, engineer.
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 12:33:02 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:



I'm a structural engineer

I have designed bridges with 12 foot tall curved steel plate girders.

I have run 100 million dollar projects

even other engineers say that I'm an annoying prick big brain


the last time somebody asked engineering advice on this forum, the advice he got was offered by somebody professing to be a civil engineer

and the advice was flat wrong to the point of being potentially deadly


don't be a fool, get the design done properly by a local engineer


View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Go hire a real engineer because the advice you get online will be worth what you paid for it.



I'm a structural engineer

I have designed bridges with 12 foot tall curved steel plate girders.

I have run 100 million dollar projects

even other engineers say that I'm an annoying prick big brain


the last time somebody asked engineering advice on this forum, the advice he got was offered by somebody professing to be a civil engineer

and the advice was flat wrong to the point of being potentially deadly


don't be a fool, get the design done properly by a local engineer




Heh....I remember that thread.

Most everyone's answers here are correct. Hire a PE.
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 12:34:14 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


Heh....I remember that thread.

Most everyone's answers here are correct. Hire a PE.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
Go hire a real engineer because the advice you get online will be worth what you paid for it.



I'm a structural engineer

I have designed bridges with 12 foot tall curved steel plate girders.

I have run 100 million dollar projects

even other engineers say that I'm an annoying prick big brain


the last time somebody asked engineering advice on this forum, the advice he got was offered by somebody professing to be a civil engineer

and the advice was flat wrong to the point of being potentially deadly


don't be a fool, get the design done properly by a local engineer




Heh....I remember that thread.

Most everyone's answers here are correct. Hire a PE.



Can someone link that thread for me?

Thanks in advance.
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 12:34:21 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Related question.  I want to remove/relocate some support beams in my attic.  What sort of professional do I look for to hire to tell me which/where to move them?  I am already on board with hiring somebody.  I just don't know if I need an architect, a structure engineer, or what.  I don't want to go with either total overkill, or someone who is just guessing.  Who is the right professional?

Thanks.   :)
View Quote


I would hire a reputable general contractor who does that kind of work.    Engineer is overkill.  They probably wouldn't know what they're doing anyway.

Link Posted: 9/9/2013 12:37:03 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


I would hire a reputable general contractor who does that kind of work.    Engineer is overkill.  They probably wouldn't know what they're doing anyway.

View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Related question.  I want to remove/relocate some support beams in my attic.  What sort of professional do I look for to hire to tell me which/where to move them?  I am already on board with hiring somebody.  I just don't know if I need an architect, a structure engineer, or what.  I don't want to go with either total overkill, or someone who is just guessing.  Who is the right professional?

Thanks.   :)


I would hire a reputable general contractor who does that kind of work.    Engineer is overkill.  They probably wouldn't know what they're doing anyway.








Or, just ask a carpenter.
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 12:38:16 PM EDT
Thanks, guys.  OP, sorry to thread-jack you.    All yours again.  (I do believe in hiring a guy to do the thinking on stuff like that, even if you are going to be swinging the hammer)
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 12:38:57 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:



Can someone link that thread for me?

Thanks in advance.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
Go hire a real engineer because the advice you get online will be worth what you paid for it.



I'm a structural engineer

I have designed bridges with 12 foot tall curved steel plate girders.

I have run 100 million dollar projects

even other engineers say that I'm an annoying prick big brain


the last time somebody asked engineering advice on this forum, the advice he got was offered by somebody professing to be a civil engineer

and the advice was flat wrong to the point of being potentially deadly


don't be a fool, get the design done properly by a local engineer




Heh....I remember that thread.

Most everyone's answers here are correct. Hire a PE.



Can someone link that thread for me?

Thanks in advance.


I believe this is the one...

http://www.ar15.com/forums/t_1_5/1376658__ARCHIVED_THREAD____Need_load_capacity_of_6x6_steel_I_beam.html&page=1
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 12:39:43 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Related question.  I want to remove/relocate some support beams in my attic.  What sort of professional do I look for to hire to tell me which/where to move them?  I am already on board with hiring somebody.  I just don't know if I need an architect, a structure engineer, or what.  I don't want to go with either total overkill, or someone who is just guessing.  Who is the right professional?

Thanks.   :)
View Quote



an architect is required to seal drawings for any plans where they are building something for human habitation

a structural engineer knows how buildings work

architects generally don't know anything at all about structural engineering except for rules of thumb

to the degree that it is hilarious



get the phone book, look up professional engineers, or structural engineers

there's going to be an assortment of semi-retired old roosters that do engineering for the local remodeling architects

or call an architect and ask who he uses for his structural engineer


all you'll need is the PE for this kind of work

Link Posted: 9/9/2013 12:40:48 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


I would hire a reputable general contractor who does that kind of work.    Engineer is overkill.  They probably wouldn't know what they're doing anyway.

View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Related question.  I want to remove/relocate some support beams in my attic.  What sort of professional do I look for to hire to tell me which/where to move them?  I am already on board with hiring somebody.  I just don't know if I need an architect, a structure engineer, or what.  I don't want to go with either total overkill, or someone who is just guessing.  Who is the right professional?

Thanks.   :)


I would hire a reputable general contractor who does that kind of work.    Engineer is overkill.  They probably wouldn't know what they're doing anyway.




LOL

the contractor hires a PE

durrrr

or he aint getting a permit


math and science are your friend


ETA -

HOLY SHIT IT'S YOU AGAIN

Link Posted: 9/9/2013 12:41:57 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
and the advice was flat wrong to the point of being potentially deadly

View Quote


Wasn't that the thread where somebody tried to size a beam based on deflection only?
Because shear, moment, bending stress, etc was for suckers?
Got all pissy when called on it, then admitted they were really wastewater eng?
I remember that thread...  

ETA: asked and answered, doh!
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 12:41:58 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:

LOL

the contractor hires a PE

durrrr

or he aint getting a permit



math and science are your friend
View Quote



If he even bothers to apply.
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 12:42:00 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:



an architect is required to seal drawings for any plans where they are building something for human habitation

a structural engineer knows how buildings work

architects generally don't know anything at all about structural engineering except for rules of thumb

to the degree that it is hilarious



get the phone book, look up professional engineers, or structural engineers

there's going to be an assortment of semi-retired old roosters that do engineering for the local remodeling architects

or call an architect and ask who he uses for his structural engineer




View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Related question.  I want to remove/relocate some support beams in my attic.  What sort of professional do I look for to hire to tell me which/where to move them?  I am already on board with hiring somebody.  I just don't know if I need an architect, a structure engineer, or what.  I don't want to go with either total overkill, or someone who is just guessing.  Who is the right professional?

Thanks.   :)



an architect is required to seal drawings for any plans where they are building something for human habitation

a structural engineer knows how buildings work

architects generally don't know anything at all about structural engineering except for rules of thumb

to the degree that it is hilarious



get the phone book, look up professional engineers, or structural engineers

there's going to be an assortment of semi-retired old roosters that do engineering for the local remodeling architects

or call an architect and ask who he uses for his structural engineer






Great advice.

There's a ton of guys (at least in my area) who take on small jobs like this now and then for a very reasonable fee.
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 12:42:56 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


Wasn't that the thread where somebody tried to size a beam based on deflection only?
Because shear, moment, bending stress, etc was for suckers?
Got all pissy when called on it, then admitted they were really wastewater eng?
I remember that thread...  
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
and the advice was flat wrong to the point of being potentially deadly



Wasn't that the thread where somebody tried to size a beam based on deflection only?
Because shear, moment, bending stress, etc was for suckers?
Got all pissy when called on it, then admitted they were really wastewater eng?
I remember that thread...  



Yes, and he's already thrown his brilliance into the mix. Guess which comment was his.
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 12:48:32 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:



LOL

the contractor hires a PE

durrrr

or he aint getting a permit


math and science are your friend


HOLY SHIT IT'S YOU AGAIN

View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
Related question.  I want to remove/relocate some support beams in my attic.  What sort of professional do I look for to hire to tell me which/where to move them?  I am already on board with hiring somebody.  I just don't know if I need an architect, a structure engineer, or what.  I don't want to go with either total overkill, or someone who is just guessing.  Who is the right professional?

Thanks.   :)


I would hire a reputable general contractor who does that kind of work.    Engineer is overkill.  They probably wouldn't know what they're doing anyway.




LOL

the contractor hires a PE

durrrr

or he aint getting a permit


math and science are your friend


HOLY SHIT IT'S YOU AGAIN


Sometimes I wonder if you're really an engineer or pretend to be one here.

Nobody hires a PE to design houses unless it's some kind of extravagant design that requires a unique structure.   It's not required by law to have a PE seal a single family house design.  Only "real property" requires a PE seal on the plans.


Link Posted: 9/9/2013 12:49:33 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


Wasn't that the thread where somebody tried to size a beam based on deflection only?
Because shear, moment, bending stress, etc was for suckers?
Got all pissy when called on it, then admitted they were really wastewater eng?
I remember that thread...  

ETA: asked and answered, doh!
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
and the advice was flat wrong to the point of being potentially deadly



Wasn't that the thread where somebody tried to size a beam based on deflection only?
Because shear, moment, bending stress, etc was for suckers?
Got all pissy when called on it, then admitted they were really wastewater eng?
I remember that thread...  

ETA: asked and answered, doh!


My answer wasn't wrong.  

Not my fault you all don't know what's going on.

Basically, all the help OP got here was a bunch of people piping in to say they're an engineer, followed by a fancy explanation to cover the fact that they haven't a clue how to even approach OP's problem.
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 12:51:38 PM EDT
I'm a Civil PE and, if I were building my home there, I would not use the the clay material you have discribed as subgrade for any type of footing whatsoever certainly not one designed for a 2000PSF bearing. You need the advise of a local engineer or use a local EXPERIENCED contractor to build youor home that will guarantee his work long term.
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 12:53:20 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:

Sometimes I wonder if you're really an engineer or pretend to be one here.

Nobody hires a PE to design houses unless it's some kind of extravagant design that requires a unique structure.   It's not required by law to have a PE seal a single family house design.  Only "real property" requires a PE seal on the plans.


View Quote



You are wrong.

Actually, any design outside the prescriptive standards of the building codes requires the services and siganture/seal of a Registered Design Professional.

Ask me how I know.
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 12:53:34 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Nobody hires a PE to design houses unless it's some kind of extravagant design that requires a unique structure.  
View Quote


I see you're from VA? Please tell me you don't seal anything structures-related along the Gulf Coast.

No, really.

Please, I'm raising a family here.
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 12:55:05 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:



You are wrong.

Actually, any design outside the prescriptive standards of the building coded require the services and siganture/seal of a Registered Design Professional.

Ask me how I know.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:

Sometimes I wonder if you're really an engineer or pretend to be one here.

Nobody hires a PE to design houses unless it's some kind of extravagant design that requires a unique structure.   It's not required by law to have a PE seal a single family house design.  Only "real property" requires a PE seal on the plans.





You are wrong.

Actually, any design outside the prescriptive standards of the building coded require the services and siganture/seal of a Registered Design Professional.

Ask me how I know.


I highlighted what is the same so you can better understand what I said.  Also, real property is a specific legal term that describes what is required to be sealed by a PE.
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 12:55:47 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


I see you're from VA? Please tell me you don't seal anything structures-related along the Gulf Coast.

No, really.

Please, I'm raising a family here.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Nobody hires a PE to design houses unless it's some kind of extravagant design that requires a unique structure.  


I see you're from VA? Please tell me you don't seal anything structures-related along the Gulf Coast.

No, really.

Please, I'm raising a family here.


Don't worry, you're safe from me.

Link Posted: 9/9/2013 12:56:53 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:

Basically, all the help OP got here was a bunch of people piping in to say they're an engineer, followed by a fancy explanation to cover the fact that they haven't a clue how to even approach OP's problem.
View Quote


Hmmm.  That's one interpretation.

Or the rest of us were professional enough to either recommend licensed design guidance or just plain STFU and laugh at the shenanigans.

Link Posted: 9/9/2013 12:56:57 PM EDT


Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:



Quoted:



Quoted:



Quoted:



Quoted:

Go hire a real engineer because the advice you get online will be worth what you paid for it.






I'm a structural engineer



I have designed bridges with 12 foot tall curved steel plate girders.



I have run 100 million dollar projects



even other engineers say that I'm an annoying prick big brain





the last time somebody asked engineering advice on this forum, the advice he got was offered by somebody professing to be a civil engineer



and the advice was flat wrong to the point of being potentially deadly





don't be a fool, get the design done properly by a local engineer









Heh....I remember that thread.



Most everyone's answers here are correct. Hire a PE.







Can someone link that thread for me?



Thanks in advance.




I believe this is the one...



http://www.ar15.com/forums/t_1_5/1376658__ARCHIVED_THREAD____Need_load_capacity_of_6x6_steel_I_beam.html&page=1



Well that escalated quickly lol.
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 1:02:11 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


I highlighted what is the same so you can better understand what I said.  Also, real property is a specific legal term that describes what is required to be sealed by a PE.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:

Sometimes I wonder if you're really an engineer or pretend to be one here.

Nobody hires a PE to design houses unless it's some kind of extravagant design that requires a unique structure.   It's not required by law to have a PE seal a single family house design.  Only "real property" requires a PE seal on the plans.





You are wrong.

Actually, any design outside the prescriptive standards of the building coded require the services and siganture/seal of a Registered Design Professional.

Ask me how I know.


I highlighted what is the same so you can better understand what I said.  Also, real property is a specific legal term that describes what is required to be sealed by a PE.



Must be philosophical, because I don't consider seismic design, wind design, etc., to be "extravagances".

BTW, I've been paid for structural design services for hundreds of single family residences, from 600sf cabins, to tract homes, to massive luxury homes.

You are very dangerous.
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 1:03:39 PM EDT
Best to weed out the crap advice early on things like this. Expansive soils (if that's what the OP has), can cause very costly problems down the road.
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 1:05:06 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:

Sometimes I wonder if you're really an engineer or pretend to be one here.

Nobody hires a PE to design houses unless it's some kind of extravagant design that requires a unique structure.   It's not required by law to have a PE seal a single family house design.  Only "real property" requires a PE seal on the plans.


View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
Related question.  I want to remove/relocate some support beams in my attic.  What sort of professional do I look for to hire to tell me which/where to move them?  I am already on board with hiring somebody.  I just don't know if I need an architect, a structure engineer, or what.  I don't want to go with either total overkill, or someone who is just guessing.  Who is the right professional?

Thanks.   :)


I would hire a reputable general contractor who does that kind of work.    Engineer is overkill.  They probably wouldn't know what they're doing anyway.




LOL

the contractor hires a PE

durrrr

or he aint getting a permit


math and science are your friend


HOLY SHIT IT'S YOU AGAIN


Sometimes I wonder if you're really an engineer or pretend to be one here.

Nobody hires a PE to design houses unless it's some kind of extravagant design that requires a unique structure.   It's not required by law to have a PE seal a single family house design.  Only "real property" requires a PE seal on the plans.





LOL

who the fuck would pretend to be a structural engineer on the internet?  wouldn't that be kind of weird?
 

I have a master's degree in engineering and 25 years of experience designing large structures, mostly bridges.  

you can ask me any question at all about bridge design, no matter how obscure, I can tell you not only the theory, but the practical method of design and the history of how the design process evolved


I never do any residential work, except for my own use.


regarding a PE seal requirement on the plans: that depends on who is issuing the permit

some townships will make you get a PE seal on a 2 foot high garden wall










Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 5
Top Top