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Posted: 4/30/2011 1:03:08 PM EDT
Looking at books. Thinking about getting Death Troopers after the recent Star Wars thread. I've read literally everything by Crichton and nearly everything by King (I read a lot, and quickly). I also like Robin Cook all right, along with Koontz and Conn Iggulden.

I guess my favorite authors are H.P. Lovecraft (already read everything by him), Stephen King, and Michael Crichton. There are a lot of others in there too, though.

I like pretty much everything but comedy.

Got any recommendations for me?
Link Posted: 4/30/2011 1:13:45 PM EDT
Have you ever read anything by Neal Stephenson? I highly recommend Cryptonomicon.

Link Posted: 4/30/2011 1:14:41 PM EDT
Originally Posted By raven:
Have you ever read anything by Neal Stephenson? I highly recommend Cryptonomicon.



What's it like?
Link Posted: 4/30/2011 1:17:22 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/30/2011 1:19:11 PM EDT by raven]

Originally Posted By ScramasaxDurango:
Originally Posted By raven:
Have you ever read anything by Neal Stephenson? I highly recommend Cryptonomicon.



What's it like?

It's a huge book that takes place both during WWII and the 1990's. It's just a brilliant book. I like King and Crichton and Lovecraft too, so I think we have similar literary tastes.

Cryptonomicon zooms all over the world, careening conspiratorially back and forth between two time periods––World War II and the present. Our 1940s heroes are the brilliant mathematician Lawrence Waterhouse, cryptanalyst extraordinaire, and gung ho, morphine-addicted marine Bobby Shaftoe. They're part of Detachment 2702, an Allied group trying to break Axis communication codes while simultaneously preventing the enemy from figuring out that their codes have been broken. Their job boils down to layer upon layer of deception. Dr. Alan Turing is also a member of 2702, and he explains the unit's strange workings to Waterhouse. "When we want to sink a convoy, we send out an observation plane first.... Of course, to observe is not its real duty––we already know exactly where the convoy is. Its real duty is to be observed.... Then, when we come round and sink them, the Germans will not find it suspicious."

All of this secrecy resonates in the present-day story line, in which the grandchildren of the WWII heroes––inimitable programming geek Randy Waterhouse and the lovely and powerful Amy Shaftoe––team up to help create an offshore data haven in Southeast Asia and maybe uncover some gold once destined for Nazi coffers. To top off the paranoiac tone of the book, the mysterious Enoch Root, key member of Detachment 2702 and the Societas Eruditorum, pops up with an unbreakable encryption scheme left over from WWII to befuddle the 1990s protagonists with conspiratorial ties.

Cryptonomicon is vintage Stephenson from start to finish: short on plot, but long on detail so precise it's exhausting. Every page has a math problem, a quotable in-joke, an amazing idea, or a bit of sharp prose. Cryptonomicon is also packed with truly weird characters, funky tech, and crypto––all the crypto you'll ever need, in fact, not to mention all the computer jargon of the moment. A word to the wise: if you read this book in one sitting, you may die of information overload (and starvation). ––Therese Littleton ––This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


Link Posted: 4/30/2011 1:17:47 PM EDT
I work at amazon, entertainment is seeing the really weird shit they sell on the shelves. some of it I would NEVER have thought of.
and couldn't post about without a ban hammer here.
Link Posted: 4/30/2011 1:19:44 PM EDT
Len Deighton
Link Posted: 4/30/2011 1:21:53 PM EDT
Now is an excellent time to get into George R.R. Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire series, starting with A Game of Thrones. I think its a great series. Also, if you haven't read Patrick O'Brian's Aubrey/Maturin series or Bernard Cornwell's Sharpe series, I recommend those as well.

Link Posted: 4/30/2011 1:22:00 PM EDT
Bookmarking a book thread
Link Posted: 4/30/2011 1:23:40 PM EDT
Originally Posted By raven:

Originally Posted By ScramasaxDurango:
Originally Posted By raven:
Have you ever read anything by Neal Stephenson? I highly recommend Cryptonomicon.



What's it like?

It's a huge book that takes place both during WWII and the 1990's. It's just a brilliant book. I like King and Crichton and Lovecraft too, so I think we have similar literary tastes.

Cryptonomicon zooms all over the world, careening conspiratorially back and forth between two time periods––World War II and the present. Our 1940s heroes are the brilliant mathematician Lawrence Waterhouse, cryptanalyst extraordinaire, and gung ho, morphine-addicted marine Bobby Shaftoe. They're part of Detachment 2702, an Allied group trying to break Axis communication codes while simultaneously preventing the enemy from figuring out that their codes have been broken. Their job boils down to layer upon layer of deception. Dr. Alan Turing is also a member of 2702, and he explains the unit's strange workings to Waterhouse. "When we want to sink a convoy, we send out an observation plane first.... Of course, to observe is not its real duty––we already know exactly where the convoy is. Its real duty is to be observed.... Then, when we come round and sink them, the Germans will not find it suspicious."

All of this secrecy resonates in the present-day story line, in which the grandchildren of the WWII heroes––inimitable programming geek Randy Waterhouse and the lovely and powerful Amy Shaftoe––team up to help create an offshore data haven in Southeast Asia and maybe uncover some gold once destined for Nazi coffers. To top off the paranoiac tone of the book, the mysterious Enoch Root, key member of Detachment 2702 and the Societas Eruditorum, pops up with an unbreakable encryption scheme left over from WWII to befuddle the 1990s protagonists with conspiratorial ties.

Cryptonomicon is vintage Stephenson from start to finish: short on plot, but long on detail so precise it's exhausting. Every page has a math problem, a quotable in-joke, an amazing idea, or a bit of sharp prose. Cryptonomicon is also packed with truly weird characters, funky tech, and crypto––all the crypto you'll ever need, in fact, not to mention all the computer jargon of the moment. A word to the wise: if you read this book in one sitting, you may die of information overload (and starvation). ––Therese Littleton ––This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.




haha I'm writing a book right now about a group of people who go after some Nazi gold post-WWII
Link Posted: 4/30/2011 2:04:52 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ScramasaxDurango:
Originally Posted By raven:

Originally Posted By ScramasaxDurango:
Originally Posted By raven:
Have you ever read anything by Neal Stephenson? I highly recommend Cryptonomicon.



What's it like?

It's a huge book that takes place both during WWII and the 1990's. It's just a brilliant book. I like King and Crichton and Lovecraft too, so I think we have similar literary tastes.

Cryptonomicon zooms all over the world, careening conspiratorially back and forth between two time periods––World War II and the present. Our 1940s heroes are the brilliant mathematician Lawrence Waterhouse, cryptanalyst extraordinaire, and gung ho, morphine-addicted marine Bobby Shaftoe. They're part of Detachment 2702, an Allied group trying to break Axis communication codes while simultaneously preventing the enemy from figuring out that their codes have been broken. Their job boils down to layer upon layer of deception. Dr. Alan Turing is also a member of 2702, and he explains the unit's strange workings to Waterhouse. "When we want to sink a convoy, we send out an observation plane first.... Of course, to observe is not its real duty––we already know exactly where the convoy is. Its real duty is to be observed.... Then, when we come round and sink them, the Germans will not find it suspicious."

All of this secrecy resonates in the present-day story line, in which the grandchildren of the WWII heroes––inimitable programming geek Randy Waterhouse and the lovely and powerful Amy Shaftoe––team up to help create an offshore data haven in Southeast Asia and maybe uncover some gold once destined for Nazi coffers. To top off the paranoiac tone of the book, the mysterious Enoch Root, key member of Detachment 2702 and the Societas Eruditorum, pops up with an unbreakable encryption scheme left over from WWII to befuddle the 1990s protagonists with conspiratorial ties.

Cryptonomicon is vintage Stephenson from start to finish: short on plot, but long on detail so precise it's exhausting. Every page has a math problem, a quotable in-joke, an amazing idea, or a bit of sharp prose. Cryptonomicon is also packed with truly weird characters, funky tech, and crypto––all the crypto you'll ever need, in fact, not to mention all the computer jargon of the moment. A word to the wise: if you read this book in one sitting, you may die of information overload (and starvation). ––Therese Littleton ––This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.




haha I'm writing a book right now about a group of people who go after some Nazi gold post-WWII

As long as it's not in the Philippines, you're not treading over covered ground.

Link Posted: 4/30/2011 2:58:41 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/30/2011 4:05:58 PM EDT by ScramasaxDurango]
Originally Posted By raven:

Originally Posted By ScramasaxDurango:
Originally Posted By raven:

Originally Posted By ScramasaxDurango:
Originally Posted By raven:
Have you ever read anything by Neal Stephenson? I highly recommend Cryptonomicon.



What's it like?

It's a huge book that takes place both during WWII and the 1990's. It's just a brilliant book. I like King and Crichton and Lovecraft too, so I think we have similar literary tastes.

Cryptonomicon zooms all over the world, careening conspiratorially back and forth between two time periods––World War II and the present. Our 1940s heroes are the brilliant mathematician Lawrence Waterhouse, cryptanalyst extraordinaire, and gung ho, morphine-addicted marine Bobby Shaftoe. They're part of Detachment 2702, an Allied group trying to break Axis communication codes while simultaneously preventing the enemy from figuring out that their codes have been broken. Their job boils down to layer upon layer of deception. Dr. Alan Turing is also a member of 2702, and he explains the unit's strange workings to Waterhouse. "When we want to sink a convoy, we send out an observation plane first.... Of course, to observe is not its real duty––we already know exactly where the convoy is. Its real duty is to be observed.... Then, when we come round and sink them, the Germans will not find it suspicious."

All of this secrecy resonates in the present-day story line, in which the grandchildren of the WWII heroes––inimitable programming geek Randy Waterhouse and the lovely and powerful Amy Shaftoe––team up to help create an offshore data haven in Southeast Asia and maybe uncover some gold once destined for Nazi coffers. To top off the paranoiac tone of the book, the mysterious Enoch Root, key member of Detachment 2702 and the Societas Eruditorum, pops up with an unbreakable encryption scheme left over from WWII to befuddle the 1990s protagonists with conspiratorial ties.

Cryptonomicon is vintage Stephenson from start to finish: short on plot, but long on detail so precise it's exhausting. Every page has a math problem, a quotable in-joke, an amazing idea, or a bit of sharp prose. Cryptonomicon is also packed with truly weird characters, funky tech, and crypto––all the crypto you'll ever need, in fact, not to mention all the computer jargon of the moment. A word to the wise: if you read this book in one sitting, you may die of information overload (and starvation). ––Therese Littleton ––This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.




haha I'm writing a book right now about a group of people who go after some Nazi gold post-WWII

As long as it's not in the Philippines, you're not treading over covered ground.



haha all right, sweet, I'm good. It's in South Texas, btw (my book).
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