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Posted: 9/24/2004 2:15:39 PM EST
I will be 44 in a few days. Is it too late. By the time I get good I'll be a geezer.
Whatcha think?
Link Posted: 9/24/2004 2:16:04 PM EST
No...never too old.
Link Posted: 9/24/2004 2:18:21 PM EST
There are people that can't even read that play guitar. How old were you when you learned how to use a computer?
Link Posted: 9/24/2004 2:24:11 PM EST
nope

never too old to learn anything, just too late
Link Posted: 9/24/2004 2:24:18 PM EST
I got my first acoustic when I was 5 years old. My first electric at age 14(it was a real POS too.) and my first Good electric when I was 16. I played up until I was in my late 30's then when nothing really happend as far as a band goes I sold it. A couple years later I discorved the Bass Guitar, I wish I'd have picked up one when I was younger because I really liked it. No leads to worry about, lots of low end thump and power, WOW. I played Bass for a couple years and then gave it up. After not playing for about 3 years I picked up another Bass and amp last year, I just couldn't get back into it, I"m 43 now and I don't think I'll play again. Guitar is something that you've got to live, day in and day out. I used to practice for 4 or 5 hours a day, 3 or 4 days a week, sometimes more. Same with the Bass, I loved to play it but once you're out it's hard to get back into it. I may pick up an acoustic Bass in the future just to mess around with but my serious days of playing are well behind me.
Link Posted: 9/24/2004 2:33:25 PM EST
If you're interested in learning other people's songs, tablature is your friend.

If you're interested in really understanding musical theory, you need to take lessons. Music theory is facinating to me now, but when I took classes & lessons when I was younger all I cared about was playing known songs. Music is like anything else, if you can get the theory you can do anything.
Link Posted: 9/24/2004 2:50:45 PM EST
Learn to barre cords when you do. It will make things a lot better. Take it from an old music teacher.
Link Posted: 9/24/2004 3:06:14 PM EST

Originally Posted By mushoot:
Learn to bar cords when you do. It will make things a lot better. Take it from an old music teacher.



Unless you're going for Rock Guitar then learn Power cords(easy and sounds good) and the Blues Scale for lead riffs.
Bar cords are sometimes hard to finger for a beginner, power cords are easy. I could show you how to play "Smoke on the Water" with power cords in about 1 miniutes.
Link Posted: 9/24/2004 3:06:45 PM EST
Unfortunately, yes...but you CAN download songs from the net!
Link Posted: 9/24/2004 3:28:21 PM EST
Link Posted: 9/24/2004 3:31:50 PM EST
I started learning at age 50 and I can play Hendrix Star Spangled Banner pretty well.
Link Posted: 9/24/2004 3:34:13 PM EST
Heck no, go for it!
Link Posted: 9/24/2004 3:38:40 PM EST
If you don't learn how to play, in a few years you'll still be a geezer. Might just as well learn.
Link Posted: 9/24/2004 3:39:48 PM EST
You really don't even need to learn to read music. They have "tab" short for tablature, to help guitarists all around the world learn to play songs faster!



Ya know, guitarists are known for being "smarter" than all the rest!


Well not really. We wouldn't need TAB if we were. I picked up an Epiphone a few years ago, then a Mexican Strat (you'll learn about the different weapons of mass entertainment!). Sold that to fund, of all things, A GUN PURCHASE

Thinkin about getting another. Leaning towards a Les Paul this time. We'll see.

The best ad for playing was "My wife never came home and complimented me on how good my drinking is coming along." No shit.


GO FOR IT!! good luck man!
Link Posted: 9/24/2004 3:45:32 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/24/2004 3:46:44 PM EST by TNFrank]

Originally Posted By nationwide:
You really don't even need to learn to read music. They have "tab" short for tablature, to help guitarists all around the world learn to play songs faster!



Ya know, guitarists are known for being "smarter" than all the rest!


Well not really. We wouldn't need TAB if we were. I picked up an Epiphone a few years ago, then a Mexican Strat (you'll learn about the different weapons of mass entertainment!). Sold that to fund, of all things, A GUN PURCHASE

Thinkin about getting another. Leaning towards a Les Paul this time. We'll see.

The best ad for playing was "My wife never came home and complimented me on how good my drinking is coming along." No shit.


GO FOR IT!! good luck man!



Damn, I did the same thing with my Bass set-up back in '99. As for the Les Paul, I got a copy of one made by Electra for my 16th birthday, a few years later I got a Strat copy and finally a Strat(Korean for me.) and loved the heck out of it. A Les Paul is a heavy guitar that has a "muddy" tone to it, at least to my ears it sounds muddy when you compare it to a good Strat. The things I really like about Strats are the light weight and the crisp sound, it's killer for lead guitar work. Oh well, keep it real dawg, LOL
Link Posted: 9/24/2004 3:52:43 PM EST

Originally Posted By mushoot:
Learn to barre cords when you do. It will make things a lot better. Take it from an old music teacher.



I learned barre chords out of a little back pocket book.
Link Posted: 9/24/2004 4:00:24 PM EST

Originally Posted By TNFrank:
A Les Paul is a heavy guitar that has a "muddy" tone to it, at least to my ears it sounds muddy when you compare it to a good Strat. The things I really like about Strats are the light weight and the crisp sound, it's killer for lead guitar work. Oh well, keep it real dawg, LOL




Yeah, man. The strat is definiately a higher pitched instrument. My old boss got me hooked on using "Boomer" strings, I like a 10 guage set.

That Strat could really wail, Jimmy Hendricks and Stevie Ray had nothing on me!

Except years of experience and expertise!! But who cares? It's about ENJOYING yourself, in a wholesome sort of way.

I like playing more along the lines of Uncle Teddy, and that Les Paul is kind of a middle ground (if there can be such a thing) between the Strat and the Gibson Byrdland (my buddy has an Epiphone Byrdland... yum! that things is a HOOT to play!!).
Link Posted: 9/24/2004 4:06:59 PM EST

Originally Posted By ALPHAGHOST:
nope

never too old to learn anything, just too late



That's what I meant to say.
Link Posted: 9/24/2004 4:08:41 PM EST
Never.
Link Posted: 9/24/2004 5:37:08 PM EST
You are going to die anyway in the end . Might as well have some fun while your liveing .
Link Posted: 9/24/2004 5:47:04 PM EST

Originally Posted By nationwide:

Originally Posted By TNFrank:
A Les Paul is a heavy guitar that has a "muddy" tone to it, at least to my ears it sounds muddy when you compare it to a good Strat. The things I really like about Strats are the light weight and the crisp sound, it's killer for lead guitar work. Oh well, keep it real dawg, LOL




Yeah, man. The strat is definiately a higher pitched instrument. My old boss got me hooked on using "Boomer" strings, I like a 10 guage set.

That Strat could really wail, Jimmy Hendricks and Stevie Ray had nothing on me!

Except years of experience and expertise!! But who cares? It's about ENJOYING yourself, in a wholesome sort of way.

I like playing more along the lines of Uncle Teddy, and that Les Paul is kind of a middle ground (if there can be such a thing) between the Strat and the Gibson Byrdland (my buddy has an Epiphone Byrdland... yum! that things is a HOOT to play!!).



The Byrdland was Uncle Ted's ol' standard until he started playing PRS more(at least I thing it was PRS) but for smooth tones a Les Paul will work great, I used to play alot of metal so that Strat was better in my book for that kind of rock. I used GHS Boomers too but I liked the 9's even if I did tend to break high E's quite a bit. SRV used 12's, from what I've read his action was on the stiff side too so to hear him play like he did really took some finger strength. He's on Freeview on Direct TV all this month every weekend, in fact my wife and I just watched him from his '85 concert in Montrose(sic?). Oh well, catch ya' later gator.
Link Posted: 9/24/2004 5:59:41 PM EST
You are never too old to try to learn; now whether you have enough talent to play is something entirely different.
Link Posted: 9/24/2004 6:05:01 PM EST
Link Posted: 9/24/2004 6:13:18 PM EST
I had the same thought about a year ago. I'm 41. Bought me a Daytona Dean acoustic guitar and some beginner DVDs and some Happy Traum Blues DVDs. I can play the guitar now.
Link Posted: 9/24/2004 6:22:04 PM EST
Of course you can learn...never too old...do it.
The only thing as rewarding as sub MOA groups at 100 yards, is coming home and cranking up the amp....and downing a few beers.
Link Posted: 9/24/2004 6:58:07 PM EST
Just do it, you will get old wether you play the guitar or not. I'm 41 and just started a few months ago. Read a lot, take a few lessons to prevent getting used to doing things the wrong way and have fun. I enjoy finding a simple song I like, getting the tabs for it and then completely screwing it up trying to play it .
My cheapo guitar:



Fritz
Link Posted: 9/24/2004 7:02:20 PM EST
I'm 52 and will be attempting to learn guitar for the second time. Last time I tried I was 27 but wasn't serious enough. Only could play 2 songs. My brother, GOD rest his soul, was a natural and a fine musician, so its in the blood. I did get fairly good on harmonica but only felt like playing when I was tanked. Got tanked alot back then. It is never too late to learn an art form. Takes dedication and some talent, but make sure you learn in a way that's enjoyable and be PATIENT, otherwise you'll get frustrated and quit. But you do have to be disciplined. I went into visual arts at 29 and progressed very well and fast due to the long hours of practice. Believe me, at a certain level and beyond the enjoyment is worth the time and work invested. GODSPEED.
Link Posted: 10/17/2004 5:56:47 PM EST
Hey MTUSA. Did you take the plunge?

I'm 41 and thinking about trying to learn. Wanted to see if you went for it and how it went.

Bob
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