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Posted: 9/21/2013 12:21:29 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/21/2013 12:21:49 PM EST by NC_Preacher]
I read a lot... 2-3 books a week.

That said, I am running low on new stuff.

I am currently reading Lee Child's Jack Reacher series (17 books) and am on book 15. That should tell you a little about my deplorable taste in books.

I love Science Fiction and fantasy, I like military fiction and the occasional spy-thriller. I have read some horror, but it really isn't my genre. I like a good western and every once in a while, a whodunnit mystery.

I tend to find an author I like and read everything available.

Authors I have already read (And collected in hardback the best of):

Robert Heinlein (all)
David Weber (All)
David Drake (All)
Tom Clancy (Most)
Robert Ludlum (Most)
WEB Griffin (All)
Stephen King (Most)
Larry Bond (All)
Vince Flynn (All)
John Ringo (All)
David Hackworth (Some)
Stephen Hunter (All)
Louis L'Amour (All)
Arthur Hailey (Some)
Mercedes Lackey (All)
Anne McCaffery (All)
RA Salvatore (Some)
Arthur C Clarke (Some)
Eric Von Lustbader (Some)
Margaret Weis (All)
Tracey Hickman (All)
John Sanford (All)
Steve Perry (All)
Robin Cook (Most)
JRR Tolkien (All)
James Patterson (Most)
Zane Grey (Most)

So... with that list (not exhaustive, just those I could remember off the top of my head) is there an author or series that you would suggest?

Keep in mind that if I put (Some) chances are I didn't get in to the author much or I would have read more.

Help a bookaholic get his fix!!!
Link Posted: 9/21/2013 12:22:39 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/21/2013 12:26:17 PM EST by scully]
King's the Dark Tower series. Has everything in it you like.


ETA: It's a sci-fi western fantasy thriller.
Link Posted: 9/21/2013 12:25:26 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/21/2013 12:26:15 PM EST by substandard]
"A Higher Call" Adam Makos

True story about the life of a German fighter pilot, and the incident where he escorted a severely damaged B-17 back to the coast. Fascinating story, and extremely well written and researched.

ETA: just saw where you wanted series, however this book is worth the time to read.
Link Posted: 9/21/2013 12:29:33 PM EST
Isaac Asimov Foundation series.


Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 9/21/2013 12:31:24 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/21/2013 12:32:46 PM EST by Bones45]
Patrick O'brian's Master and Commander series, although the series doesn't truly get it's legs until the third book. That one is a masterpiece. In that book, he packs more in the first hundred pages than most authors do in an entire book.4


ETA there's like 20 books in the series so you won't run out soon, but you'll cry when you do because it's so good.
Link Posted: 9/21/2013 12:34:00 PM EST
Link Posted: 9/21/2013 12:34:37 PM EST
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Originally Posted By scully:
King's the Dark Tower series. Has everything in it you like.
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Originally Posted By scully:
King's the Dark Tower series. Has everything in it you like.


Read it, thanks!

Originally Posted By substandard:
"A Higher Call" Adam Makos
True story about the life of a German fighter pilot, and the incident where he escorted a severely damaged B-17 back to the coast. Fascinating story, and extremely well written and researched.


Not a big non-fiction fan since I read to take my mind off of reality, but I will check it out.

Originally Posted By Johnny_Rebo:
Isaac Asimov Foundation series.


I don't know how I skipped Asimov, but I was a huge fan of his as a kid, read almost everything he has written. Some of it more than once :) Don't have a lot of his books on hand though, not sure why.

Thanks for the tips guys, keep 'em coming!
Link Posted: 9/21/2013 12:35:46 PM EST
Link Posted: 9/21/2013 12:36:54 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Bones45:
Patrick O'brian's Master and Commander series, although the series doesn't truly get it's legs until the third book. That one is a masterpiece. In that book, he packs more in the first hundred pages than most authors do in an entire book.4
ETA there's like 20 books in the series so you won't run out soon, but you'll cry when you do because it's so good.
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Originally Posted By Bones45:
Patrick O'brian's Master and Commander series, although the series doesn't truly get it's legs until the third book. That one is a masterpiece. In that book, he packs more in the first hundred pages than most authors do in an entire book.4
ETA there's like 20 books in the series so you won't run out soon, but you'll cry when you do because it's so good.


Sounds good.. I'll take a look!



Hmmm.... I'll put that on the 'maybe' list, thanks!
Link Posted: 9/21/2013 12:37:40 PM EST
Hustler
Link Posted: 9/21/2013 12:39:06 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History


That sounds interesting, thanks!
Link Posted: 9/21/2013 12:39:45 PM EST
C.J Box......Joe Picket series
Craig Johnson.....Walt Longmire series
Link Posted: 9/21/2013 12:43:31 PM EST
Link Posted: 9/21/2013 12:43:32 PM EST
A few suggestions:

Alan Furst---excellent spy novels set in Europe in pre and inter WWII era. You'll love this guy if you are into history and especially if you've travelled much in Europe. Start with Night Soldiers and read the whole series.

Herman Wouk---best known for The Caine Mutiny---which is superb---- many of his other books are excellent as well, especially The Winds of War and War and Remembrance.

Nevil Shute---best known for his excellent 1950's doomsday novel On the Beach, many other books of his are good reads as well.

Cormac McCarthy---although I really don't care for his earlier work---YMMV---McCarthy is an absolute American literary treasure. Start with the 3 books of "The Border Trilogy"----everything from then onwards is excellent.
Link Posted: 9/21/2013 12:46:37 PM EST
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Originally Posted By code99:
A few suggestions:

Alan Furst---excellent spy novels set in Europe in pre and inter WWII era. You'll love this guy if you are into history and especially if you've travelled much in Europe. Start with Night Soldiers and read the whole series.

Herman Wouk---best known for The Caine Mutiny---which is superb---- many of his other books are excellent as well, especially The Winds of War and War and Remembrance.

Nevil Shute---best known for his excellent 1950's doomsday novel On the Beach, many other books of his are good reads as well.

Cormac McCarthy---although I really don't care for his earlier work---YMMV---McCarthy is an absolute American literary treasure. Start with the 3 books of "The Border Trilogy"----everything from then onwards is excellent.
View Quote


My suggestion as well. Read Blood Meridian.
Link Posted: 9/21/2013 12:49:53 PM EST
+1 on the Cryptonomicom and any Neal Stephenson book for that matter...

Heroic fantasy...Steven Erickson and Ian Esslemont's Malazan Book of the Fallen will keep you busy for quite a while.

Glen Cook- Black Company series and the Dread Empire series.
Link Posted: 9/21/2013 12:51:00 PM EST
Link Posted: 9/21/2013 12:56:14 PM EST
Walter W. Williams
Michael Z. Williamson
James Rollins
Matthew Reilly
Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child
Patrick Lee
Larry Correia
Link Posted: 9/21/2013 12:56:22 PM EST
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Originally Posted By diestone:
C.J Box......Joe Picket series
Craig Johnson.....Walt Longmire series
View Quote


Hadn't heard about the Picket series, but I have read the Longmire books.

On a related topic (the Longmire reminded me) does anyone else get really annoyed at stupid gun shit that authors and editors fuck up?


"There was an audible click as he disengaged the safety on his revolver."

"Scared? I'm not scared, you still have the safety on your Glock."
Link Posted: 9/21/2013 12:59:10 PM EST
How about Elmore Leonard? He wrote the books that inspired Justified on FX.
Link Posted: 9/21/2013 1:09:53 PM EST
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Originally Posted By code99:
Cormac McCarthy---although I really don't care for his earlier work---YMMV---McCarthy is an absolute American literary treasure. Start with the 3 books of "The Border Trilogy"----everything from then onwards is excellent.
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Originally Posted By code99:
Cormac McCarthy---although I really don't care for his earlier work---YMMV---McCarthy is an absolute American literary treasure. Start with the 3 books of "The Border Trilogy"----everything from then onwards is excellent.


That is the No Country for Old Men author, eh? Ok, got the Border Trilogy queued up, thanks!

Originally Posted By PNWRN:
+1 on the Cryptonomicom and any Neal Stephenson book for that matter...

Heroic fantasy...Steven Erickson and Ian Esslemont's Malazan Book of the Fallen will keep you busy for quite a while.

Glen Cook- Black Company series and the Dread Empire series.


Got the Glen Cook, like Black Company very much.

I will check out Malazan though, thanks!



I have read some of the Conan books, and they are fun, but I have to be honest and say I never really go into Lovecraft.
Link Posted: 9/21/2013 1:14:44 PM EST
The four books by Benedict Jacka - Taken, Cursed, Chosen, Fated
Link Posted: 9/21/2013 1:17:20 PM EST
You might take a look at Brent Weeks Night Angel Trilogy.

Also take a look at Preston and Child's Pendergast series.
Link Posted: 9/21/2013 1:18:47 PM EST
If you like the Reacher series you really need to check out Robert Crais. He does Elvis Cole and Joe Pike series. Cole is a PI in Los Angeles. Joe Pike is a badass and Cole's business partner. These are my favorite books.
Link Posted: 9/21/2013 1:25:22 PM EST
Link Posted: 9/21/2013 1:26:40 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/21/2013 1:30:14 PM EST by Lucifer_Sam]
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Originally Posted By Bones45:
Patrick O'brian's Master and Commander series, although the series doesn't truly get it's legs until the third book. That one is a masterpiece. In that book, he packs more in the first hundred pages than most authors do in an entire book.4


ETA there's like 20 books in the series so you won't run out soon, but you'll cry when you do because it's so good.
View Quote


O brian's Aubrey/Maturin books are some of the best books ever written



Some general recommendations--

Hard sci fi-- Greg Bear and Alistair Reynolds are great

Historic fiction: Robert Graves. Gates of Fire is Historic fiction also, its entertaining, but not very accurate

Sci fi: Frank Herbert and Vertnor Vinge

McCarthy was already mentioned. If you like McCarthy you might try Falkner, they actually remind me of each other.

Those George RR Martin books aren't bad. The tv series ones.




Link Posted: 9/21/2013 1:27:53 PM EST
IM me your address and I'll send you some of my dad's books, Michael McCollum. He was published through Del Ray. Most of the people who like science fiction like his books. His inspiration for writing is Robert Heinlein, Larry Niven and Isaac Asimov.
Link Posted: 9/21/2013 1:28:46 PM EST
John Grisham - I like him as much as Sandford, but he doesn't keep the same characters. Each book stands on its own.

Orson Scott Card (The Ender Quintet)

Link Posted: 9/21/2013 1:29:30 PM EST
Check out Charlie Huston. "Caught Stealing" was an awesome novel.
Link Posted: 9/21/2013 1:33:29 PM EST
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Originally Posted By NC_Preacher:


That sounds interesting, thanks!
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Originally Posted By NC_Preacher:


That sounds interesting, thanks!


I liked Snow Crash a whole lot better.
Did you have William Gibson on there? Neuromancer is a classic.

I'm a huge fan of both Tom McGuane (92 in the Shade, Cadence of Grass, The Sporting Club) and Jim Harrison (Dalva, True North). Those guys are genuine literature.
Link Posted: 9/21/2013 1:34:26 PM EST
I don't see any Michael Crichton in your list.

Highly recommended, right along the lines of what you have already been reading.

Also check out "The Descent" one of my favorite books. The chapter in the beginning with the tour guide in the Himalayas is.... amazing.
Link Posted: 9/21/2013 1:36:13 PM EST
Try some non-fiction such as Peter Capsticks African Library series.
Link Posted: 9/21/2013 1:36:22 PM EST
Also, if you have an e-reader of some flavor, you can hit up Project Gutenberg for free public-domain books in a variety of formats (Kindle, Nook, PDF, TXT, etc).
Link Posted: 9/21/2013 1:40:31 PM EST
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Originally Posted By texashomeserver:
The four books by Benedict Jacka - Taken, Cursed, Chosen, Fated
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Originally Posted By texashomeserver:
The four books by Benedict Jacka - Taken, Cursed, Chosen, Fated


Found the author page, read an excerpt and this sounds right up my alley! Awesome.

Originally Posted By Gismos:
You might take a look at Brent Weeks Night Angel Trilogy.

Also take a look at Preston and Child's Pendergast series.


Brent Weeks trilogy added to the list. I have the first couple of the Pendergast queued as well, sounds like it is worth a shot!
Link Posted: 9/21/2013 1:45:25 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Teamer:
How about Elmore Leonard? He wrote the books that inspired Justified on FX.
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Originally Posted By Teamer:
How about Elmore Leonard? He wrote the books that inspired Justified on FX.


Hmm... sounds good. I liked the first season of the show so it is worth a shot!

Originally Posted By 1fromtx:
This


I'll add it to the list, thanks!

Originally Posted By pdt2308:
If you like the Reacher series you really need to check out Robert Crais. He does Elvis Cole and Joe Pike series. Cole is a PI in Los Angeles. Joe Pike is a badass and Cole's business partner. These are my favorite books.


Sounds good! The Reacher series is... far-fetched, but it does read quickly and is fairly entertaining, so if these others are like them, they will fit my library just fine.
Link Posted: 9/21/2013 1:48:17 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Lucifer_Sam:

Some general recommendations--

Hard sci fi-- Greg Bear and Alistair Reynolds are great

Historic fiction: Robert Graves. Gates of Fire is Historic fiction also, its entertaining, but not very accurate

Sci fi: Frank Herbert and Vertnor Vinge

McCarthy was already mentioned. If you like McCarthy you might try Falkner, they actually remind me of each other.

Those George RR Martin books aren't bad. The tv series ones.
View Quote


I have read some of Greg Bear's stuff, and I 'think' I have read Reynolds, but I will have to go and check his bibliography. I have been reading 2-3 books a week since I was 8 (Shit... 40 years!!) so I have read a LOT of books and often find myself picking up a book that looks interesting and half a chapter in, I am like "Oh... yeah, read this."

I have read all of Frank Herbert's stuff, though Vertnor Vinge doesn't ring any bells. Same with George RR Martin, have just about all of his. I'll check out Vinge though.


Link Posted: 9/21/2013 1:52:50 PM EST
If you enjoy Urban SciFi/Fantasy novels, I really enjoy Larry Correia's books. He's a huge gun nut to boot!

Larry's Amazon Page
Larry's Blog
Link Posted: 9/21/2013 1:53:29 PM EST
If you end up enjoying the Aubrey/Maturin books by Patrick O'Brian, try the Sharpe books by Bernard Cornwell.

Both series take place during the Napoleonic War and are told from the British point of view. The Sharpe books are the infantry side of it, and the Aubrey/Maturin books the naval side. Both series are outstanding.
Link Posted: 9/21/2013 1:55:16 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Dunkelzahn:
IM me your address and I'll send you some of my dad's books, Michael McCollum. He was published through Del Ray. Most of the people who like science fiction like his books. His inspiration for writing is Robert Heinlein, Larry Niven and Isaac Asimov.
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Originally Posted By Dunkelzahn:
IM me your address and I'll send you some of my dad's books, Michael McCollum. He was published through Del Ray. Most of the people who like science fiction like his books. His inspiration for writing is Robert Heinlein, Larry Niven and Isaac Asimov.


Cool! IM sent

Originally Posted By wcontratto:
John Grisham - I like him as much as Sandford, but he doesn't keep the same characters. Each book stands on its own.
Orson Scott Card (The Ender Quintet)


Yes to both, and have read everything I can get my hands on of both!

Originally Posted By ArmaNotSoLite:
Check out Charlie Huston. "Caught Stealing" was an awesome novel.


Doesn't ring any bells, so I will check it out!
Link Posted: 9/21/2013 1:56:31 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/21/2013 2:04:49 PM EST by WayneD]
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Originally Posted By NC_Preacher:


Hadn't heard about the Picket series, but I have read the Longmire books.

On a related topic (the Longmire reminded me) does anyone else get really annoyed at stupid gun shit that authors and editors fuck up?


"There was an audible click as he disengaged the safety on his revolver."

"Scared? I'm not scared, you still have the safety on your Glock."
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Originally Posted By NC_Preacher:
Originally Posted By diestone:
C.J Box......Joe Picket series
Craig Johnson.....Walt Longmire series


Hadn't heard about the Picket series, but I have read the Longmire books.

On a related topic (the Longmire reminded me) does anyone else get really annoyed at stupid gun shit that authors and editors fuck up?


"There was an audible click as he disengaged the safety on his revolver."

"Scared? I'm not scared, you still have the safety on your Glock."


I did notice that as the Longmire books progressed the gun derp went down. In some of the latter books he described Walt's .45 as being cocked and locked and none of him continuously cocking and uncocking it. So, maybe Johnson is paying attention and trying to do better.

You mentioned Vince Flynn, if you like him you'll probably like Brad Thor.
Link Posted: 9/21/2013 1:56:39 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/21/2013 1:57:42 PM EST by FarmerPatriot]
Anything by George Pelecanos- very gritty DC crime novels. Think "The Wire"

Neal Stephenson

Caleb Carr- The Alienist and subsequent works

Ed Abbey- Fool's Progress

Cormac McCarthy- Blood Meridian (possibly the best book ever)

ETA: Forgot Charles deLint's works of urban fantasy. Check him out...awesome
Link Posted: 9/21/2013 1:57:52 PM EST
Michael Crichton, Dan Brown, Hugh Howey,
Link Posted: 9/21/2013 1:59:14 PM EST
"Leadership Secrets of Atilla the Hun" Weiss Roberts.
Very short read, but interesting for anyone desiring to be a leader, or just live their life. You can actually download it online for free.
Link Posted: 9/21/2013 1:59:30 PM EST
Originally Posted By NC_Preacher:
I read a lot... 2-3 books a week.

That said, I am running low on new stuff.

I am currently reading Lee Child's Jack Reacher series (17 books) and am on book 15. That should tell you a little about my deplorable taste in books.

I love Science Fiction and fantasy, I like military fiction and the occasional spy-thriller. I have read some horror, but it really isn't my genre. I like a good western and every once in a while, a whodunnit mystery.

I tend to find an author I like and read everything available.

Authors I have already read (And collected in hardback the best of):

Robert Heinlein (all)
David Weber (All)
David Drake (All)
Tom Clancy (Most)
Robert Ludlum (Most)
WEB Griffin (All)
Stephen King (Most)
Larry Bond (All)
Vince Flynn (All)
John Ringo (All)
David Hackworth (Some)
Stephen Hunter (All)
Louis L'Amour (All)
Arthur Hailey (Some)
Mercedes Lackey (All)
Anne McCaffery (All)
RA Salvatore (Some)
Arthur C Clarke (Some)
Eric Von Lustbader (Some)
Margaret Weis (All)
Tracey Hickman (All)
John Sanford (All)
Steve Perry (All)
Robin Cook (Most)
JRR Tolkien (All)
James Patterson (Most)
Zane Grey (Most)

So... with that list (not exhaustive, just those I could remember off the top of my head) is there an author or series that you would suggest?

Keep in mind that if I put (Some) chances are I didn't get in to the author much or I would have read more.

Help a bookaholic get his fix!!!
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There are some writers on ARFCOM. Give Larry Correria (sorry if not spelled correctly ) Monster Hunters International.
Link Posted: 9/21/2013 1:59:33 PM EST
Link Posted: 9/21/2013 2:01:00 PM EST
Eric Flint's 1632 series.
Matthew Bracken's Enemies Foreign and Domestic.
Link Posted: 9/21/2013 2:01:04 PM EST
Lonesome Dove by Larry McMurtry
Link Posted: 9/21/2013 2:02:18 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Renmek:
Eric Flint's 1632 series.
Matthew Bracken's Enemies Foreign and Domestic.
View Quote

This
Link Posted: 9/21/2013 2:03:02 PM EST
Here's what I do.

Every day I check here. I download whatever looks good. Hell, they're free.

You don't need a Kindle, you can get an app for your phone.

Link Posted: 9/21/2013 2:03:08 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/21/2013 2:05:45 PM EST by Lucifer_Sam]
Originally Posted By NC_Preacher:

I have read some of Greg Bear's stuff, and I 'think' I have read Reynolds, but I will have to go and check his bibliography. I have been reading 2-3 books a week since I was 8 (Shit... 40 years!!) so I have read a LOT of books and often find myself picking up a book that looks interesting and half a chapter in, I am like "Oh... yeah, read this."

I have read all of Frank Herbert's stuff, though Vertnor Vinge doesn't ring any bells. Same with George RR Martin, have just about all of his. I'll check out Vinge though.


View Quote



Bear is hit or miss. His good stuff is really good, his bad stuff is crap. Hardfought and Anvil of stars are some of the best sci fi books I've read. Vitals was terrible.

Reynolds is pretty new. His characters are lacking in his earlier books, but his sci fiction is incredible. Some of the most clever, imaginative stuff I've read, but still generally based on known science and not fantasy science.

I'm actually about to get some Greg Egan books. Hes supposed to be really, really good.
Link Posted: 9/21/2013 2:03:30 PM EST
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Originally Posted By w12x40:

I liked Snow Crash a whole lot better.
Did you have William Gibson on there? Neuromancer is a classic.

I'm a huge fan of both Tom McGuane (92 in the Shade, Cadence of Grass, The Sporting Club) and Jim Harrison (Dalva, True North). Those guys are genuine literature.
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Originally Posted By w12x40:

I liked Snow Crash a whole lot better.
Did you have William Gibson on there? Neuromancer is a classic.

I'm a huge fan of both Tom McGuane (92 in the Shade, Cadence of Grass, The Sporting Club) and Jim Harrison (Dalva, True North). Those guys are genuine literature.


I have read Gibson's stuff, cool, but he gets weird is some spots if I remember correctly. Haven't heard of the other two so I will check them out!

Originally Posted By JustaGunNut:
I don't see any Michael Crichton in your list.
Highly recommended, right along the lines of what you have already been reading.


You know, I have read a couple of his and I remember liking one, hating the other. I'm willing to give Descent a shot though, since you recomend it.

Originally Posted By PrivateJoker1341:
If you enjoy Urban SciFi/Fantasy novels, I really enjoy Larry Correia's books. He's a huge gun nut to boot!

Larry's Amazon Page
Larry's Blog


Checked out his blog and he sounds interesting!

Originally Posted By Jarhead_22:
, try the Sharpe books by Bernard Cornwell.
Both series take place during the Napoleonic War and are told from the British point of view. The Sharpe books are the infantry side of it, and the Aubrey/Maturin books the naval side. Both series are outstanding.


Huh... why don't I know about these? I have his Warlord trilogy and his Grail Quest trilogy plus a couple of others. I will definitely check the Sharpe books out!
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