Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
BCM
Member Login

Site Notices
Posted: 4/26/2014 10:09:59 AM EDT
Lithium batteries are better, but do any of you know how nickel metal hydride does in comparison?
Link Posted: 4/26/2014 10:14:31 AM EDT
ALL battery technologies suffer from temperature effects.



Cold conditions always reduce the available power as it reduces the rate at which the chemical reactions in the battery can proceed.





The word is LOSE, not LOOSE.




Link Posted: 4/26/2014 10:17:47 AM EDT
What are you using these batteries in? How cold? There are a tom Of variables and zero information given. Lithium is usually a good bet for cold weather.
Link Posted: 4/26/2014 3:42:24 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By cmjohnson:
ALL battery technologies suffer from temperature effects.

Cold conditions always reduce the available power as it reduces the rate at which the chemical reactions in the battery can proceed.


The word is LOSE, not LOOSE.

View Quote


Yep!
Link Posted: 4/26/2014 3:43:29 PM EDT
Batteries loosing power?  They'd better keep those electrons tied up, then.  
Link Posted: 4/26/2014 4:10:24 PM EDT
...in a flashlight.
Link Posted: 4/26/2014 4:14:26 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/27/2014 10:14:15 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By GraniteStateMike:
Energizer lithiums
View Quote


Yep.

If you're worried about hot, or cold, get some Energizer Lithium Ultimates, or Advanced.

The shelf life is now up and over 20 years, they're half the weight and don't leak.

Nominal voltage is in the 1.8v range.

Chris
Link Posted: 4/27/2014 11:06:43 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/27/2014 11:07:18 AM EDT by Skibane]
Originally Posted By M4-AK:
Lithium batteries are better, but do any of you know how nickel metal hydride does in comparison?
View Quote


Compared to alkaline cells, Sanyo claims that their "Eneloop" Ni-MH batteries have superior low-temperature performance.

From their "Eneloop Battery Handbook":



This chart is with a 0.5 amp load on the battery - which is pretty substantial.

At lower loads, the Alkalines don't look quite as bad in comparison.
Link Posted: 4/27/2014 11:20:32 AM EDT
Link Posted: 4/27/2014 11:36:08 AM EDT
I tape mine in place. Have not lost one yet.
Link Posted: 4/27/2014 12:02:04 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Skibane:


Compared to alkaline cells, Sanyo claims that their "Eneloop" Ni-MH batteries have superior low-temperature performance.

From their "Eneloop Battery Handbook":

http://imageshack.com/a/img842/2267/6n7r.jpg

This chart is with a 0.5 amp load on the battery - which is pretty substantial.

At lower loads, the Alkalines don't look quite as bad in comparison.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Skibane:
Originally Posted By M4-AK:
Lithium batteries are better, but do any of you know how nickel metal hydride does in comparison?


Compared to alkaline cells, Sanyo claims that their "Eneloop" Ni-MH batteries have superior low-temperature performance.

From their "Eneloop Battery Handbook":

http://imageshack.com/a/img842/2267/6n7r.jpg

This chart is with a 0.5 amp load on the battery - which is pretty substantial.

At lower loads, the Alkalines don't look quite as bad in comparison.


NiMH generally perform better in cold temps and under high current draw - but then you have to deal with all their other detriments, such as cell memory (which is better now), energy density, and cell life cycle.

If you already have a bunch of lithium cells and chargers, I'm not sure it's worth investing in another cell chemistry.  But if your chargers will work with NiMH, couldn't hurt to buy a few cells and try them out.  Just make sure you don't charge them or the Lions incorrectly, as they have different per cell voltages (1.2V vs. 3.7V).


Link Posted: 4/27/2014 8:04:31 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By shaun315:
NiMH generally perform better in cold temps and under high current draw - but then you have to deal with all their other detriments, such as cell memory (which is better now), energy density, and cell life cycle.
View Quote


Sanyo claims their current-generation "eneloops" are good for up to 1500 charge-discharge cycles, and retain 75% percent of their original charge after 3 years in storage.

Some of the other conventional NiMH cells have very high self-discharge rates (i.e., completely dead after 1 month in storage), and thus aren't a very good choice for flashlights that aren't used and recharged frequently.
Link Posted: 4/27/2014 8:15:34 PM EDT
Energizer Lithium AA or CR123A are the best in cold weather. I think Li-Ion is better than NiMH or Alkalines.

Link Posted: 4/28/2014 9:39:52 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By ad_nauseam:
Energizer Lithium AA or CR123A are the best in cold weather. I think Li-Ion is better than NiMH or Alkalines.

View Quote


Anyone have troubles using Energizer Lithium in their LED lights?
Link Posted: 4/28/2014 10:13:45 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By ad_nauseam:
Energizer Lithium AA or CR123A are the best in cold weather. I think Li-Ion is better than NiMH or Alkalines.

View Quote


Nope, NiMH is generally better in cold. In the past, I always used NiMH batteries in my cameras in winter, because Li-Ion would get so weak that the camera wouldn't even power up unless the batteries were really fresh. But now I rarely even carry a camera, and just keep my cell phone (which is Li-Ion) in an inner pocket where it stays warm. My S4 takes damn good pics for a cell phone, and has decent battery life (much better than the S3 it replaced). But if you keep it in an outside pocket when it's sub-zero outside, it's probably not going to work when you need it.
Link Posted: 4/28/2014 10:18:32 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Skibane:


Compared to alkaline cells, Sanyo claims that their "Eneloop" Ni-MH batteries have superior low-temperature performance.

From their "Eneloop Battery Handbook":

http://imageshack.com/a/img842/2267/6n7r.jpg

This chart is with a 0.5 amp load on the battery - which is pretty substantial.

At lower loads, the Alkalines don't look quite as bad in comparison.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Skibane:
Originally Posted By M4-AK:
Lithium batteries are better, but do any of you know how nickel metal hydride does in comparison?


Compared to alkaline cells, Sanyo claims that their "Eneloop" Ni-MH batteries have superior low-temperature performance.

From their "Eneloop Battery Handbook":

http://imageshack.com/a/img842/2267/6n7r.jpg

This chart is with a 0.5 amp load on the battery - which is pretty substantial.

At lower loads, the Alkalines don't look quite as bad in comparison.


Sweet, that means that my Logitec G700s will work in the bitter cold! (it came with one Sanyo Eneloop battery )
Top Top