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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 10/24/2002 4:59:57 AM EDT
[url]www.dallasnews.com/dmn/news/stories/100902dnmettoyguns.632ea.html[/url] [size=6]Boy almost pays dearly for realism of trendy toy gun[/size=6] [b]'The possibilities are terrifying'[/b] 10/09/2002 [b]By SCOTT PARKS / The Dallas Morning News[/b] George Dunham didn't want to be a killjoy. So he bought his 11-year-old son the hot toy for boys. Everyone in the neighborhood, it seemed, owned an airsoft pistol or rifle – a realistic-looking replica that fires plastic projectiles about twice the size of traditional metal BBs. Now Mr. Dunham and other parents are counting their blessings and reconsidering the wisdom of letting their sons run around their Coppell neighborhood with real-looking toy guns. "We could have had a tragedy on our hands," said Mr. Dunham, who co-hosts a sports radio show. "The possibilities are terrifying." Here's what happened: Coppell police Officer Cayce Williams was on patrol near the intersection of Crane and Mockingbird at 2:30 p.m. Monday. It was a day off school for students; teachers were working. The boys were home, but the rainy weather didn't hold them inside the house. They donned their protective eyewear and went outside to play war games with their airsoft guns. Officer Williams noticed one of the boys walking down the street. As he drove by in his patrol car, it looked as if the boy was trying to conceal something in his left hand, Officer Williams would report later that afternoon. It looked like a handgun. Officer Williams turned around, and the boy ran onto Pelican Lane. It took him about 300 yards to catch up to the boy, he said. "The handgun was in his left hand and I drew my firearm and pointed at him as I exited my vehicle," Officer Williams wrote in his report. The boy, listed as age 12, dropped his pistol on the ground and put up his hands. Amid tears, he explained that his gun wasn't real and shot only soft pellets. Even up close, Officer Williams said, the pistol looked exactly like a Sig Sauer P228, a 9 mm handgun. A bright orange plastic tip on the end of the barrel – a legal requirement for replica firearms – was the only indication that it was a toy, he said. "The gun had a detachable magazine, working slide and hammer," he said in his report. "It appeared to be real." Other boys had run away when they spotted Officer Williams. They told their mothers what happened, and those moms rushed to the scene. Back-up police units, including a special-operations van, showed up. Mr. Dunham, a morning talk show host on KTCK-AM (1310), was at home when his son ran into the house to report his friend's encounter with Officer Williams. Mr. Dunham said the incident shook him up and made him think. He talked at length about it on his Tuesday morning radio program. "I'm really sorry and embarrassed," he said. "Police have enough on their hands. They don't need to be having to figure out what's a real gun and what's not." Police declined to identify the 12-year-old boy who had stared into the barrel of Officer Williams' very real pistol. They turned him and his airsoft pistol over to his mother and filed no charges against him. Mr. Dunham said he and other parents confiscated the guns from their sons. [b]'Going to be big'[/b] Sporting good stores and Internet retailers sell the airsoft replicas of real firearms. Many of them come from Europe and are sold under licensing agreements with firearms manufacturers that make the real thing. The guns, sold under a variety of brand names, range in price from a spring-operated pistol for $20 to gas-powered automatic machine guns that sell for $350 to $400. Lee Grubb Jr., a salesman for Academy Sports & Outdoors in Dallas, said the airsoft guns are gradually replacing traditional BB guns for two reasons: You can retrieve and reuse the brightly colored pellets, and customers think the plastic pellets are less likely to injure someone than metal BBs or pellets. "This Christmas, they are going to be big," Mr. Grubb said. Airsoft gun sellers say their products seem to appeal to the same people who engage in paintball war games. Paintball guns have unique designs that don't resemble real firearms. But realism is a major selling point for airsoft guns. Airsplat.com of Pasadena, Calif., touts its airsoft guns as "identical to their real counterparts," saying "they feel, look and act like the real thing." Ash Chan, a customer service representative for the company, said airsoft gun enthusiasts fall into two major categories: boys who like BB guns, and older guys who attend organized war games that require realistic military attire and authentic-looking replicas of pistols, assault rifles and machine guns. "I know parents have a tough time controlling their kids," Mr. Chan said. "But they should really discourage them from playing with these things out in public." Mr. Dunham agrees. "As popular as it is with your kids, [red]you have to take a stand against it[/red]," he said. [center][img]www.dallasnews.com/img/10-02/1009met_airsoft.gif[/img][/center] ---------------------------------------------- USPC40 [img]www.ar15.com/members/albums/USPC40/line.gif[/img] [url=www.nra.org][b][red]NRA[/red][/url] [url=www.nra.org][blue]Life Member[/blue][/url] [url=www.gunowners.org][b][red]GOA[/red] [/url] [url=www.gunowners.org][blue]Life Member[/blue][/url] [url=www.saf.org][red]SAF[/red][/url] [url=www.saf.org][blue]Supporter[/blue][/url] [url=sas-aim.org][red]SAS[/red][/url] [url=sas-aim.org][blue]Supporter[/blue][/b][/url] [img]www.ar15.com/members/albums/USPC40/alabamaflag.gif[/img]
Link Posted: 10/24/2002 5:08:15 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/24/2002 5:09:55 AM EDT by SeaDweller]
I think those guns used to be banned before, Tokyo Marui and such. Guess they'll be banned again. Get your preban airsoft! Hey I thought you typed in that, "the possibilities are terrifying" line. I followed the link and it's there![:O]
Link Posted: 10/24/2002 5:10:28 AM EDT
NEVER, NEVER point a gun at anything you do not intend to destroy. Toy guns just like real guns. That teaches the WRONG lesson about firearms. My children are not allowed to point any of their toys at another child or adult. Play with them yes. Any time they want. But never point them at ANYBODY. Paintball when they get to be older teens OK MAYBE. My boy is also eleven and he knows not to play those games. Dumbshit parents deserve a spanking.
Link Posted: 10/24/2002 5:58:24 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Arock: NEVER, NEVER point a gun at anything you do not intend to destroy.
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Are you referring to the cop? The article didn't say the kid pointed his toy at the cop.
Toy guns just like real guns. That teaches the WRONG lesson about firearms. My children are not allowed to point any of their toys at another child or adult. Play with them yes. Any time they want. But never point them at ANYBODY.
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It's kinda hard to hit someone with the airsoft pellet if you don't aim it at them. If the person you aim your airsoft gun at knows it's a toy and is playing with you, then I don't see a problem. However, it's not too smart to point one of those things at someone who doesn't know any better. USPC40 [img]www.ar15.com/members/albums/USPC40/line.gif[/img] [url=www.nra.org][b][red]NRA[/red][/url] [url=www.nra.org][blue]Life Member[/blue][/url] [url=www.gunowners.org][b][red]GOA[/red] [/url] [url=www.gunowners.org][blue]Life Member[/blue][/url] [url=www.saf.org][red]SAF[/red][/url] [url=www.saf.org][blue]Supporter[/blue][/url] [url=sas-aim.org][red]SAS[/red][/url] [url=sas-aim.org][blue]Supporter[/blue][/b][/url] [img]www.ar15.com/members/albums/USPC40/alabamaflag.gif[/img]
Link Posted: 10/24/2002 6:11:02 AM EDT
Ever since I first heard about airsoft a year or so ago, I have been afraid of something like this happening. You should have to be 18 in order to purchase, own, or operate (or be a minor with an adult supervising) an airsoft gun. Those things are cool as hell, I wouldn't mind getting one and playing... but they are just too damn real appearing for little kids to be running around with. When I was a kid all I had was a bright green plastic M16 that clicked when you pulled the trigger.. that was plenty fun for me [:D]
Link Posted: 10/24/2002 6:16:37 AM EDT
Originally Posted By USPC40:
Originally Posted By Arock: NEVER, NEVER point a gun at anything you do not intend to destroy.
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Are you referring to the cop? The article didn't say the kid pointed his toy at the cop.
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Of course not referring to the officer. It's the kids who were obviously engaged in a game of Cops & Robbers or maybe Patriots & Muslims. The problem is kids pointing any kind of firearm, even toys, at anyone. Just teaches the WRONG LESSON. And I'm NOT one of the zero-tolerance fools who can't understand what kids and play are.
Toy guns just like real guns. That teaches the WRONG lesson about firearms. My children are not allowed to point any of their toys at another child or adult. Play with them yes. Any time they want. But never point them at ANYBODY.
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It's kinda hard to hit someone with the airsoft pellet if you don't aim it at them. If the person you aim your airsoft gun at knows it's a toy and is playing with you, then I don't see a problem. However, it's not too smart to point one of those things at someone who doesn't know any better. USPC40
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Again, children should NOT be taught to point firearms at anything they do not intend to destroy. It teaches incorrect behavior and disrespect for firearms. I know the boy in question is only eleven. I have an eleven year-old son too. And I know what he gets into. On a daily basis. He "plays" with toy guns, an air rifle, a .22 Cricket and a .260 Remington hunting rifle. And he knows how to handle all of them. Correctly and responsibly. And reinforcing bad behavior patterns with toys is detrimental to responsible firearms training. Kids are gonna have fun. Try to make it productive.
Link Posted: 10/24/2002 6:20:01 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Arock: NEVER, NEVER point a gun at anything you do not intend to destroy. Toy guns just like real guns. That teaches the WRONG lesson about firearms. My children are not allowed to point any of their toys at another child or adult. Play with them yes. Any time they want. But never point them at ANYBODY. Paintball when they get to be older teens OK MAYBE. My boy is also eleven and he knows not to play those games. Dumbshit parents deserve a spanking.
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lighten up dude. are you telling me your children don't play cops and robbers or cowboys and indians? it's sad when a child can't play a game like this.
Link Posted: 10/24/2002 6:33:25 AM EDT
Arock.. I have to disagree. Teaching kids the difference between fantasy and reality is the way to do it. I grew up playing "guns" and pointing my toy guns at friends while they pointed theirs at me blazing away at each other. I've also played every ultra violent video game under the sun. My parents didn't shelter me from anything.. they just made sure I knew what was real, and what was fantasy... and that what I see in fantasy should not be done in the real world. Me and my brother have both turned out just fine. Both are very safe gun owners... even after years and years of playing with toy guns and pointing them at all sorts of people. We know are bushmasters are very real weapons, and learned how to handle them accordingly.
Link Posted: 10/24/2002 6:33:46 AM EDT
lighten up dude. are you telling me your children don't play cops and robbers or cowboys and indians? it's sad when a child can't play a game like this.
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Agreed!!! It's a sad thing if kids can't play war games anymore. 'Dumbshit parents' should think twice before they draw their own guns. When I was a kid we used to play war games all the time, toting our realistic looking toy guns around and no cops stopped us nor drew guns at us. Nowdays it's different, people see terrorists and Al Qaida members everywhere. Sometimes I wonder how easily one can get shot, take your wallet out in a wrong angle in a wrong place and some idiot puts 3 rounds thru your chest. Regards, Petri
Link Posted: 10/24/2002 6:34:57 AM EDT
Link Posted: 10/24/2002 6:37:12 AM EDT
Originally Posted By 308wood:
Originally Posted By Arock: NEVER, NEVER point a gun at anything you do not intend to destroy. Toy guns just like real guns. That teaches the WRONG lesson about firearms. My children are not allowed to point any of their toys at another child or adult. Play with them yes. Any time they want. But never point them at ANYBODY. Paintball when they get to be older teens OK MAYBE. My boy is also eleven and he knows not to play those games. Dumbshit parents deserve a spanking.
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lighten up dude. are you telling me your children don't play cops and robbers or cowboys and indians? it's sad when a child can't play a game like this.
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Put your reading glasses on and go back and read the messages. Nothing you can do will stop kids from playing those games. It's probably written in their genetic code. What you can do is use those games to reinforce positive firearm attitudes and discipline. I'm ambivalent to these new "airsoft" toys. When kids get older, say 13-15 and want to play paintball that's fine. They're old enough to learn with a more extensive behavior reference base. It's younger kids I worry about. Any tool that teaches a sub-10 year old to shoot other kids is a problem to me. Especially a toy gun that actually shoots a projectile. It's the behavior not the tool that's bad. I see a difference between a toy cap pistol or a Star Wars toy and a very realistic airsoft toy. I'm not sure kids can adequately differentiate between those things and the more realistic a toy is the more the tool imprints on a childs learning. It's all part of the learning process for a kid. I want my kids to learn the right lessons. I'm not going to just let them loose with any new technology that comes along.
Link Posted: 10/24/2002 6:37:37 AM EDT
Airsoft replicas are NOT sold as toys! they are replicas, used for novelty and movie props, and shoot projectiles, and parents should not be buying them for their kids, unless those kids are responsible enough to NOT put themselves in a dangerous situation. I have heard of kids playing laser tag, which the gun does not really look like a firearm, and a kid was shot and killed by a cop when the boy startled him thinking it was his laser tag buddy...
Link Posted: 10/24/2002 6:40:18 AM EDT
There was an article about this very topic in Cincinnati yesterday. I wonder if someone is running a negative press campaign... [url]http://www.channelcincinnati.com/news/1736887/detail.html[/url]
New Technology: Toy BB Gun, Real Risks Officers Concerned Over Similarities POSTED: 5:21 p.m. EDT October 23, 2002 UPDATED: 5:25 p.m. EDT October 23, 2002 CINCINNATI -- Concern about a new kind of gun danger is on the minds of local police, and it surrounds a new style of BB gun. WLWT Eyewitness News 5's Brian Hamrick reported Wednesday that the Air Soft technology is designed to shoot a plastic projectile. And while it's obviously not as potent as a typical handgun, police are having a hard time differentiating it from a handgun. Just last year, a man who was pointing such a gun at some people in Walnut Hills was shot to death by Cincinnati police. It turned out that the man had only a pellet gun. But because all styles of guns are all starting to look alike, officers are expressing concerns, Hamrick reported. "The legal standard that governs police conduct in these kinds of cases is a reasonable belief or fear of serious harm to an officer or citizen," Cincinnati police Capt. James Whalen said. "These types of weapons could certainly cause a reasonable fear." The new wave of weapon is becoming a hot item in cyberspace, Hamrick reported. Cincinnati police have nearly 1,000 of them just in their evidence room. The Air Soft technology is becoming commonplace for military-style games like Paint Ball, Hamrick reported. It's a low-velocity BB made of plastic, and they're easy to find, even locally. "It puts the officer in a very difficult situation, especially when things are moving rapidly," Whalen said. Once evidence technicians are finished checking the 961 guns in their custody, the weapons are then destroyed.
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Link Posted: 10/24/2002 6:52:57 AM EDT
Thanks for each of your replys. To keep from having to address each of you guys individually let me do a sort'a wrap-up. My point addresses the age-appropriateness of the airsoft things. My kids play the same games every other kid does at ten years. What gives me pause is the realism of the airsoft guns. I wouldn't allow my kids to enact with any of our real firearms as I'm sure none of you would either. I'm concerned Airsoft guns cross the line into more realistic behavior than a ten year-old is prepared to understand. It IS the fantasy versus reality issue. To me there's a difference between a toy gun that's readily identifiable to a child as a toy and something that may elicit another perception. I am also opposed to younger children engaging in behavior of shooting other children with toy guns that actually shoot a projectile. It's the age-appropriate tool thing again. They wanna make a gun with their hand or use a toy Lone Rnager gun that's OK by me. It's the same reason it's OK for them to shoot each other with a Super Squirter but not a realistic pistol. It's the perception level of which a ten year-old is capable that makes the difference.
Link Posted: 10/24/2002 7:45:28 AM EDT
Originally Posted By dskeet: You should have to be 18 in order to purchase, own, or operate (or be a minor with an adult supervising) an airsoft gun.
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well technically they are since its a BB gun just almost no one that a airsoft falls under the BB gun law if your state has one.
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