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Posted: 8/25/2004 10:32:31 AM EST
What is the proper procedure for refueling a commercial aircraft?
Link Posted: 8/25/2004 10:35:18 AM EST
You're out of character.... Please rephrase, or you will be assumed to be an imposter!
Link Posted: 8/25/2004 10:36:43 AM EST
Sry, genav pilot here

I usually pull up to the ramp, get out, go talk to the guys in the FBO, they get the truck and they fillerup
Link Posted: 8/25/2004 10:37:15 AM EST
Call the FBO with the fuels contract.....


Originally Posted By The_Neutral_Observer:
What is the proper procedure for refueling a commercial aircraft?

Link Posted: 8/25/2004 10:38:33 AM EST
Its supposed to be supervised/checked by the pilot. Depending on the aircraft this may actually invlove dipping the tanks on some smaller commuters, not just looking at the guages.
At least I think thats right.
Link Posted: 8/25/2004 11:05:00 AM EST
I worked on F-4's and F/A-18's.

If we were running the birds throught he fuel pits, we would avoid the intakes, chock the tires, ground the bird, open the access panel, attach the fuel hose, open the valve in the hose, then turn on the pump and watch the counter click by at 5 gallons per second.

If we were using a fuel truck we would ground the truck, then proceed as above, but not worry about getting sucked down an intake.
Link Posted: 8/25/2004 11:14:05 AM EST

Originally Posted By DPeacher:
I worked on F-4's and F/A-18's.

If we were running the birds throught he fuel pits, we would avoid the intakes, chock the tires, ground the bird, open the access panel, attach the fuel hose, open the valve in the hose, then turn on the pump and watch the counter click by at 5 gallons per second.

If we were using a fuel truck we would ground the truck, then proceed as above, but not worry about getting sucked down an intake.



Ding Ding. Yup. and Commerical aircraft (and even business jets) have very accurate gauges and most would be impossible to visually or with a stick check tanks as they use single point refueling. These are usually located on the underside of the aircraft, towards the rear and plumbed to the tanks in the wings. Pilots order fuel by weight. 6 or 7 pounds a gallon, I can't remember which. Then they do the math and tell the lineman, ramp rat, fueler how many gallons to put on.
Link Posted: 8/25/2004 11:16:29 AM EST
Thanks a bunch guys.
Link Posted: 8/25/2004 11:20:45 AM EST
We have a company called Swissport that fuels our airplanes. They just pull up and hook up and let em rip. We have fuel panels on the wing or wing to body fairing that the fuelers read from. If a guage in the flight deck is broken(mel) a tech has to go out and verify how much fuel is on board.

The most accurate way to measure fuel is by weight, not gallons. Most small aircraft measure by gallons. I think almost all pax jets measure by weight.

Rob
Link Posted: 8/25/2004 11:45:33 AM EST
Link Posted: 8/25/2004 12:05:51 PM EST
Hey Sweep, ever do any refuel work at Nellis?
Link Posted: 8/26/2004 2:46:38 AM EST
Link Posted: 8/26/2004 3:14:53 AM EST
never done concurent re-fueling?
Link Posted: 8/26/2004 3:31:11 AM EST

Originally Posted By The_Neutral_Observer:
What is the proper procedure for refueling a commercial aircraft?



depends on company policy and iaw manufactures procedures which are usually model specific.

genericly speaking;

1. assure it's safe to fuel a/c
2. ground a/c
3. ground truck
4. power up a/c, as needed
5. configure a/c
6. load per fuel manifest and/or instructions
7. secure
8. verify
Link Posted: 8/26/2004 3:35:01 AM EST
Hi all,
When I was doing a lot of flying at the club level, we used to have to fuel the planes after each flight. Fueling a small Cessna or Piper is not too different from doing a car, except you use the ground wire and watch the fuel level in the tank. It is always embarassing to over fill and taxi back to the club with fuel streaming out the vent. You only do that once.

As always with a small aircraft, you check to color of the fuel to make sure the right type is in the tank, and also check the low points in the tanks and fuel system for water. In a humid climate with 1/4 full tanks, you can get a lot of condensation in a tank overnight. This is one reason tanks are usually left full.

Dez
Link Posted: 8/26/2004 3:37:50 AM EST
you yell out the window "fill er up!!!" and a guy in a jumpsuit runs out and puts fuel in, washes the windows and checks the oil.
Link Posted: 8/27/2004 3:33:11 PM EST

Originally Posted By Sweep:

Originally Posted By eaglebite:
Hey Sweep, ever do any refuel work at Nellis?



Nope, but had some friends that were stationed there. Most were at Tonapah though. When were you there?



I was there from January 99- June 02. I heard Tonapah sucks!
Link Posted: 8/27/2004 3:39:47 PM EST
The in exp of the Psywar1-0 he has observed that you land on the dirt strip and some guy in stained coveralls jumps out of the Hi lux and uses a hand pump to fill your bird out of the 55 gallon drums in the back.

YMMV due to change in Continent and Threat level
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