Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login

Site Notices
9/16/2019 10:09:13 PM
Posted: 1/2/2012 5:36:22 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/2/2012 5:38:09 AM EDT by macro]
I have a routed strat body that needs paint.
I want a professional, quality finish.
Looking for a simple gloss black body...no graphics, nothing fancy...just a deep black body with a rich clear coat.

I'm good with carpentry and tools, but I know nothing about paint.
To have it professional painted by a luthier it's going to cost a few hundred bucks.
Alternatively, I could invest that money in supplies and a new sander and try it myself.
That said, I know nothing about painting, wet sanding, or buffing.

Is it worth it to try it myself? Am I better off just having a pro do the work?
I found gloss blank paint and clear coat from a luthier supply website in an aerosol can...thinking about getting a few cans of each and just trying it, but I don't want to spend $100 on paint and sand paper only to screw up the body and have to resand the whole thing, then give it to a pro to do it right.

I suppose my question is, how hard is it to paint? (and have it look like a real job like a guitar hanging in a shop)

Do you apply the clear coat over a glossy paint or do you sand the paint and leave it flat before the clear coat? If I read things correctly, after the clear coat, you wet sand and then buff to get it shiny again...is that right?

Mechanically, electrically, and carpentry wise, I know how to assemble, wire, and professionally set up an electric guitar...have put together dozens of my own and a few for other folks over a few decades. Paint...I have no idea.

Advice from those with experience would be really appreciated.
Thanks guys
Link Posted: 1/2/2012 5:38:56 AM EDT
Earl Scheib, $89.95.





Just kidding, I am interested in the answer as well.
Link Posted: 1/2/2012 5:45:18 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/2/2012 5:50:02 AM EDT by macro]
FYI, this is the product I am considering...

Link to Stewmac site

Also wondering what tools I should plan to have on hand...I'm figuring that a palm sander and detail sander would be handy, and it sounds like I would need a buffer. (or can I just buff by hand for a small job like this?)

Or...am I out of my league? As much as wasting money, I also don't want to waste time....I'm fine with investing 2 months of my time to get this guitar perfect....I'm going to be annoyed if I spend 2 months, screw it up, and then still need to send it out and have it done right.
Link Posted: 1/2/2012 5:48:12 AM EDT
Originally Posted By macro:
FYI, this is the product I am considering...

Link to Stewmac site



For less than $11, try it out on a smooth sanded block of wood. See how it looks.
Link Posted: 1/2/2012 5:51:31 AM EDT
Originally Posted By DV8:
Originally Posted By macro:
FYI, this is the product I am considering...

Link to Stewmac site



For less than $11, try it out on a smooth sanded block of wood. See how it looks.


Been considering getting a can of the black paint and a can of a clear and doing this...basic trial and error.
Might be the most simple way to answer the question.
Link Posted: 1/2/2012 6:19:21 AM EDT
Paint it like a car, using two stage automotive paint.
Sand the body with 220 grit paper, then apply a primer/sealer. Apply base coat, let dry and wet sand with 400-600. Apply several layers of clear over the wet sanded base coat and allow to dry. Wet sand with 1000-1500 grit then buff to a high gloss. Doing it yourself will probably cost more than having a pro do it if you dont already have the supplies. Might want to pop into a local automotive paint store and see if they do paint and how much they charge.

The key to painting is he initial surface prep and sealing. Make sure its perfect. Sand out any imperfections in each layer as they are applied. The painting environment needs to be as dust-free as possible.
Link Posted: 1/2/2012 6:38:29 AM EDT
Originally Posted By anjan9:
Paint it like a car, using two stage automotive paint.
Sand the body with 220 grit paper, then apply a primer/sealer. Apply base coat, let dry and wet sand with 400-600. Apply several layers of clear over the wet sanded base coat and allow to dry. Wet sand with 1000-1500 grit then buff to a high gloss. Doing it yourself will probably cost more than having a pro do it if you dont already have the supplies. Might want to pop into a local automotive paint store and see if they do paint and how much they charge.

The key to painting is he initial surface prep and sealing. Make sure its perfect. Sand out any imperfections in each layer as they are applied. The painting environment needs to be as dust-free as possible.


I've considered this, and have gone the route of using a body shop in the past.
I don't have a compressor or any spray tools whatsoever, and I wouldn't invest in them since I won't be using them regularly...so doing it myself with these products is out. Might entertain using a body shop again though....hmmm
Link Posted: 1/3/2012 7:31:28 PM EDT
I personally would go with a body shop. It's really not worth the expense to buy all you need to do the job right if your only doing it once. Not to mention it does take skill and practice. Your going to have to do a lot of work to get it right. Now if you had a buddy with a sprayer and stuff I would say try it out, but your going to spend more time and money than it's worth.
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 10:09:55 AM EDT
All the answers are here- ReRanch
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 4:15:03 PM EDT
Originally Posted By divkat9:
All the answers are here- ReRanch


Thanks, that actually did help confirm a few things I suspected.

At this point I am taking things in a little different direction. I found a local luthier who can do paint for me, and there is a chrome shop that is able to do a full chrome coating as well. Before I drop any real money on the project Im going to do a little stain work on the body and see if I can pop the grain a bit. A bottle of black stain was less than $10. If it looks good I'll get a few cans of aerosol clear and take a shot at doing a gloss nitro finish over the stain. Best case, it comes out well and I learn how to wet sand in the process. Worst case, I sand it back down and pay a pro to do the job right

Stay tuned
Top Top