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Posted: 9/1/2005 1:24:13 PM EDT
Posted at my company's website so far:

A Special Operations MC-130 aircraft from Hurlburt Field, Fla., flew into New Orleans International Airport Wednesday night with a team working to reopen this critical air transport hub. The 621st Contingency Response Wing personnel sent from McGuire Air Force Base, N.J., arrived at New Orleans and have begun the task of establishing bare base airfield operations.

• The 615th CRW from Travis Air Force Base, Calif., has deployed forward personnel to Lafayette Regional Airport, to help reopen the airfield as a potential staging area for incoming cargo and personnel. Follow-on strategic airlift aircraft, including C-5s, will be delivering much-needed relief supplies.

• Eleven C-130 aircraft with various special mission capabilities, including helicopter refueling, were flown in from Moody Air Force Base, Ga., in support of rescue operations.

• A U-2 took off Thursday morning from Beale Air Force Base, Calif., to capture high-resolution photographs of the Gulf Coast area. These photos will be provided to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to assist with disaster relief efforts.

Within the last 48 hours the Air Force has flown nine airlift missions in support of Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) hurricane relief operations. Seven of those flights carried much needed food, water and supplies for local residents.

There were also two 433rd Airlift Wing medical evacuation flights carrying sick and injured from the area. On Thursday there are at least 12 Air Force airlift relief missions in coordination to carry a mix of relief supplies and emergency response equipment to communities along the Gulf Coast. Additional aeromedical evacuation flights out of New Orleans International Airport are also in the planning stages.

The Air Force has moved more than 190 tons of relief supplies and support equipment along with 181 passengers and 54 medical patients. Currently there is a 105-member Red Horse team from Hurlburt Field, Fla., assisting relief operations in the gulf region. This is a heavy civil engineering construction unit which is self-contained and specializes in disaster recovery of facilities and infrastructure.


Feel free to post more positive news here, thanks.
Link Posted: 9/1/2005 1:26:12 PM EDT
The Air Force can't really do a lot of stuff until they get an airfield open that's near enough to the shit. Ground transportation is a bitch.

I say send in the C-130's and air drop in the supplies.
Link Posted: 9/1/2005 1:26:20 PM EDT
Post it over on DU??.........................I'm a bad boy!!!
Link Posted: 9/1/2005 1:27:28 PM EDT
Are the gunships on the way? They might need the sensors, close air support in urban terrain, and at night.

Link Posted: 9/1/2005 1:27:40 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/1/2005 1:28:18 PM EDT by www-glock19-com]
Sounds like they are sending the wrong type of 130
damn beat me to it
Link Posted: 9/1/2005 1:29:06 PM EDT

Originally Posted By KA3B:
The Air Force can't really do a lot of stuff until they get an airfield open that's near enough to the shit. Ground transportation is a bitch.

I say send in the C-130's and air drop in the supplies.



Gulfport Airport and Keesler's airstrips are open, we (AFRC) have birds there as I type this. This will help with the Gulfport/Biloxi area.
Link Posted: 9/1/2005 1:29:09 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/1/2005 1:30:23 PM EDT by leungken]
Air drop where, can't really drop cargo into wetlands.

Come on guys, more positive news instead of all the doom and gloom, where are the best of us Americans.
Link Posted: 9/1/2005 1:41:14 PM EDT

Originally Posted By KlubMarcus:
Are the gunships on the way? They might need the sensors, close air support in urban terrain, and at night.

chronicle.augusta.com/iraq/graphics/weapons_ac130_gunship.gif



That will take care of the piece of shit looters
Link Posted: 9/1/2005 1:48:49 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Crzy_One:
That will take care of the piece of shit looters

Yep, and if an AC-130 is too big a footprint then maybe the NOPD can deputize Blackwater commandos. The anti-gun left will p00p a brick sideways if "private military contractors" were patrolling 'Nawlins with door gunners.
Link Posted: 9/1/2005 2:25:05 PM EDT
C-130 Loadmasters can hit dry land with no problems.


Originally Posted By leungken:
Air drop where, can't really drop cargo into wetlands.

Come on guys, more positive news instead of all the doom and gloom, where are the best of us Americans.

Link Posted: 9/1/2005 2:27:31 PM EDT
You can air drop supplies but when you do there will be a riot on the ground...Do you drop anyway?
Link Posted: 9/1/2005 4:14:37 PM EDT
No different than tossing pesos off of the Shit River bridge to the local kids....


Originally Posted By Retched_Rick:
You can air drop supplies but when you do there will be a riot on the ground...Do you drop anyway?

Link Posted: 9/1/2005 4:21:43 PM EDT

Originally Posted By KA3B:
No different than tossing pesos off of the Shit River bridge to the local kids....


Originally Posted By Retched_Rick:
You can air drop supplies but when you do there will be a riot on the ground...Do you drop anyway?




Link Posted: 9/1/2005 4:21:50 PM EDT
RELEASE -- Secretary of the Air Force, Office of Public Affairs

Release No. 070905
September 1, 2005

OC-135 "Open Skies" aircraft to take and deliver pictures of the Gulf Coast

WRIGHT PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Ohio -- An OC-135B Air Force aircraft, similar to the Boeing 707, based at Offutt Air Force Base, Neb., will take and deliver film of pictures taken of the damage left in the wake of hurricane Katrina, to be developed at Wright-Patterson AFB.

The media processing facility at Wright-Patterson AFB is the only U.S. Government Facility dedicated to the processing and duplication of imagery from this aircraft. It is one of only a handful of governmental facilities that still exists and can process long-roll imagery.

Film rolls are 1000 feet long by 5 inches wide, which makes processing at local outlets impossible.



Air Force Snaps Photos Of Devastation For Government Relief Efforts

POSTED: 4:33 pm CDT September 1, 2005
UPDATED: 4:49 pm CDT September 1, 2005

OFFUTT AIR FORCE BASE, Neb. -- KETV NewsWatch 7 went flying Thursday with a team from Offutt Air Force Base, as it surveyed the damage on the Gulf Coast.

The Air Force crew from Offutt is mapping the area around Hurricane Katrina’s destruction path to give experts a better idea of what needs to be done. The crew is flying the OC 135 -- also known as the Open Skies aircraft. It usually flies over foreign lands taking photos to verify treaties.

"We're very, very proud to be part of this effort," said Brig. Gen. John Koziol. "We have the individuals and professionals who know how to do this mission, and it's all about helping our folks in Georgia, Mississippi and Alabama who are really, really hurting right now."

Koziol’s crew spent Thursday taking high-resolution photographs of the Gulf Coast.

"The key thing here, is just to work the issue, get the imagery get the imagery processed and get it down to the folks who need it so they can do hurricane relief support," he said.

Vietnam War era cameras in the belly of the plane will film the areas ravaged by the hurricane. The imagery will help government relief agencies decide where supply lines should be -- and where the first construction crews should go.

Master Sgt. Jim Majors is part of the mission. He has a sister in Louisiana, but he set emotions aside to fly the mission.

"There's a lot of damage and it's a national emergency for us. We're here to give all the support we can," Majors said.

The crew from the Fightin' 55th left Thursday morning and is expected back at Offutt Thursday evening. KETV NewsWatch 7 photojournalist Peter Soby was on the jet.

Link Posted: 9/1/2005 4:25:24 PM EDT
I started a thread about air-dropping in supplies and people went ape-shit. I wish my thread was more like this one, all I wanted was a civil discussion and an answer why we couldnt air drop in supplies.
Link Posted: 9/1/2005 4:29:30 PM EDT

Originally Posted By eodtech2000:

Originally Posted By KA3B:
The Air Force can't really do a lot of stuff until they get an airfield open that's near enough to the shit. Ground transportation is a bitch.

I say send in the C-130's and air drop in the supplies.



Gulfport Airport and Keesler's airstrips are open, we (AFRC) have birds there as I type this. This will help with the Gulfport/Biloxi area.


Just saw pictures of C-130s on the strip in NOLA.
Link Posted: 9/1/2005 4:30:50 PM EDT

Originally Posted By MrScaramanga:
I started a thread about air-dropping in supplies and people went ape-shit. I wish my thread was more like this one, all I wanted was a civil discussion and an answer why we couldnt air drop in supplies.


This isn't about air dropping supplies. If you'll notice the smart ass smiley, I'm sure it was meant to make fun of people like you.
Link Posted: 9/1/2005 4:34:02 PM EDT

Film rolls are 1000 feet long by 5 inches wide, which makes processing at local outlets impossible.


From the "no fucking shit, Sherlock" file.



Can you just see an AF tech walking into Wal-Mart with a 1000 foot film canister and asking the lady behind the counter if she can get this done in an hour?



Yeah and I'm sure the chemistry used for processing grandma's Kodacolor Gold 200 is the same one for the AF film too.
Link Posted: 9/1/2005 4:40:41 PM EDT

Originally Posted By MrScaramanga:
I started a thread about air-dropping in supplies and people went ape-shit. I wish my thread was more like this one, all I wanted was a civil discussion and an answer why we couldnt air drop in supplies.



<sigh>
PLENTY of people gave you good info, you fixed upon the responses you didn't like and then there it went.

As was posted in your thread and this one, there is NO PLACE for the air dropped supplies to safely land.

Air drop pallets come out of the back of a C-130/-17/-141/-5 at about 130+ knots.

The chutes open up and slow the cargo down, HOWEVER, since the military does not want the air dropped cargo hanging out in the wind (large target, off target) they are moving at the ground at around 30 knots or so.

It's not some big puffy slow decent.

They use up to 12 inches of compressable cardboard under the cargo to absorb the impact.

There are no DEPLOYED laser guided air drop pallets, if the Loadmaster can get within a few hundred yards of the drop zone (depending on the winds, altitude and air speed) they are doing good.

The military can't do a low altitude release because there is not enough room for the pallets to deaccelerate, plus the safety factor.

Helos are not being used to ferry supplies in great numbers because they are still out there rescueing people and shuttling rescuers and rescue supplies around.

The big helos are on their way from the Navy/Marines and the Air Force.

So now will you get off of it and quit whining.
Link Posted: 9/1/2005 4:43:41 PM EDT

Originally Posted By KA3B:


Film rolls are 1000 feet long by 5 inches wide, which makes processing at local outlets impossible.






wow.
Link Posted: 9/1/2005 5:06:39 PM EDT
the 283rd Combat Comm is sending satellite communications support to get the emergency communications infrastructure back up
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