Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/26/2005 2:14:18 AM EDT
$10 billion found on Robinson Crusoe island

600 barrels of loot found on Crusoe island

Jonathan Franklin in Santiago
Monday September 26, 2005
The Guardian

The archipelago is named after Robinson Crusoe, but perhaps it should have been called Treasure Island.

A long quest for booty from the Spanish colonial era appears to be culminating in Chile with the announcement by a group of adventurers that they have found an estimated 600 barrels of gold coins and Incan jewels on the remote Pacific island.

"The biggest treasure in history has been located," said Fernando Uribe-Etxeverria, a lawyer for Wagner, the Chilean company leading the search. Mr Uribe-Etxeverria estimated the value of the buried treasure at US$10bn (£5.6bn).

Article continues
The announcement set off ownership claims. The treasure hunters claimed half the loot was theirs and said they would donate it to non-profit-making organisations. The government said that they had no share to donate.

It also prompted speculation about the contents of what is considered to be one of the great lost treasures from the Spanish looting of South America. Chilean newspapers were filled with reports that the stash includes 10 papal rings and original gold statues from the Incan empire.

The hoard is supposedly buried 15 metres (50ft) deep on Robinson Crusoe island, also known as the Juan Fernández island, home to Scottish sailor Alexander Selkirk, the adventurer immortalised by Daniel Defoe as Robinson Crusoe. Selkirk was dumped on the island and lived alone for four years before being rescued. His exploits brought worldwide attention to the islands.

For centuries treasure hunters have scoured the island in search of booty which was reportedly buried there in 1715 by Spanish sailor Juan Esteban Ubilla y Echeverria. Using everything from old Spanish ship manifests to teams of islanders with shovels and picks, foreigners have made so many claims of discovering the lost treasure that islanders are usually sceptical of the proclamations.

This most recent announcement, however, deserves greater credence because of the equipment used by the treasure hunters: a mini robot that can scan 50 metres deep into the earth. The robot, dubbed "Arturito", was invented by Chileans and over the past year has grabbed headlines by breaking some of the country's biggest criminal mysteries.

First, the robot detected the buried arsenal of a rightwing sect known as Colonia Dignidad. The guns and rocket launchers were buried at some 10 metres and while the authorities had searched for years, the robot found the buried weapons almost instantly. Then, in the case of missing businessman Jose Yuraszeck, Arturito was able to analyse the soil and identify the molecular composition of human bones, allowing investigators to dig straight to the body of the murder victim.

Link Posted: 9/26/2005 3:06:26 AM EDT
See, this is why I could never get into treasure hunting. After spending a lifetime searching for billions in treasure, somebody else makes a claim to it and you get the shaft.

I've looked all over the place on Treasure Island. All I could find was section 8 housing and dirty SF city busses. That place went to hell when the base closed.
Link Posted: 9/26/2005 3:30:32 AM EDT
I grew up on Treasure Island.
Link Posted: 9/26/2005 3:33:49 AM EDT
Nice how the government fucks the guys who found it in the ass. Typical.

This is why, when you find something valuable, you KEEP YOUR FRIGGIN' MOUTH SHUT ABOUT IT!
Link Posted: 9/26/2005 3:42:54 AM EDT

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:
See, this is why I could never get into treasure hunting. After spending a lifetime searching for billions in treasure, somebody else makes a claim to it and you get the shaft.

I've looked all over the place on Treasure Island. All I could find was section 8 housing and dirty SF city busses. That place went to hell when the base closed.



I spent some time there too!
Link Posted: 9/26/2005 3:43:58 AM EDT
Why would they announce finding the treasure before it is dug up?

I wouldn't announce anything until everything was in my hands.
Link Posted: 9/26/2005 3:44:23 AM EDT
As a little FYI, "Arturito" is what we Spaniards call R2D2, as "artowdeetwo" sounds pretty similar to it.

"artworeetwo" would be spot on the money to pronounce "Arturito"
Link Posted: 9/26/2005 3:44:36 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Swindle1984:
Nice how the government fucks the guys who found it in the ass. Typical.

This is why, when you find something valuable, you KEEP YOUR FRIGGIN' MOUTH SHUT ABOUT IT!



I was just going to say the same thing - SHUT THE FUCK UP about it, launder the money, and live off the interest for the rest of your life. Jeez.
Link Posted: 9/26/2005 3:46:05 AM EDT
I wonder of that Robot can find all the guns lost in boating accidents over the years?
Link Posted: 9/26/2005 3:56:52 AM EDT
Agrrrr, get your mits off me treasure!
Link Posted: 9/26/2005 4:08:55 AM EDT
If the .gov had seized his treasure find, that would have royally screwed up the plot of The Count of Monte Cristo.

Whatever happened to finders-keepers? Is the rightful owner going to pop out of a grave to claim it?
Link Posted: 9/26/2005 4:24:53 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/26/2005 4:25:14 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Greywolf2112:

Originally Posted By Swindle1984:
Nice how the government fucks the guys who found it in the ass. Typical.

This is why, when you find something valuable, you KEEP YOUR FRIGGIN' MOUTH SHUT ABOUT IT!



I was just going to say the same thing - SHUT THE FUCK UP about it, launder the money, and live off the interest for the rest of your life. Jeez.



The problem is that much of the modern dollar value of lost treasure is not in the spot price of silver & gold but the antiquity, historic and archaeological significance that collectors, museums, etc. (mostly private collectors) are willing to pay $$$ for. Unfortunately, to command the premium dollar amount that a collector is willing to pay for your "treasure", you must be able to support your find with provedance. Provedance places a specific artifact in a specific place at a specific time and the provedance must remain unbroken in order to maintain the added value. As an example, a gold 2 Escudo coin with good provedance from the wreck of the 1715 fleet may fetch $3000 or $4000 -vs- some guy at a flea market who claims his coins came from the 1715 fleet (with no provedance) that may sell for $300 to $400.

For this guy to loot the buried treasure and start trying to convert it into cash without the provedance (including a valid proof of claim to the find, independant archaeolgy, field documentation, and line item object recovery record with notation from find# to first point of retail sale) all he has is the spot value of silver & gold which may not be enough to even cover the cost of recovery.
Link Posted: 9/26/2005 4:27:50 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Makarov:

Originally Posted By Greywolf2112:

Originally Posted By Swindle1984:
Nice how the government fucks the guys who found it in the ass. Typical.

This is why, when you find something valuable, you KEEP YOUR FRIGGIN' MOUTH SHUT ABOUT IT!



I was just going to say the same thing - SHUT THE FUCK UP about it, launder the money, and live off the interest for the rest of your life. Jeez.



The problem is that much of the modern dollar value of lost treasure is not in the spot price of silver & gold but the antiquity, historic and archaeological significance that collectors, museums, etc. (mostly private collectors) are willing to pay $$$ for. Unfortunately, to command the premium dollar amount that a collector is willing to pay for your "treasure", you must be able to support your find with provedance. Provedance places a specific artifact in a specific place at a specific time and the provedance must remain unbroken in order to maintain the added value. As an example, a gold 2 Escudo coin with good provedance from the wreck of the 1715 fleet may fetch $3000 or $4000 -vs- some guy at a flea market who claims his coins came from the 1715 fleet (with no provedance) that may sell for $300 to $400.

For this guy to loot the buried treasure and start trying to convert it into cash without the provedance (including a valid proof of claim to the find, independant archaeolgy, field documentation, and line item object recovery record with notation from find# to first point of retail sale) all he has is the spot value of silver & gold which may not be enough to even cover the cost of recovery.



I'm thinkin spot price alone would cover costs on 600 BARRELS of gold coins.
Link Posted: 9/26/2005 4:28:34 AM EDT
Did they actually lay eyes on it or are they making the claim based upon sensing images?
Link Posted: 9/26/2005 4:33:59 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Specop_007:

Originally Posted By Makarov:

Originally Posted By Greywolf2112:

Originally Posted By Swindle1984:
Nice how the government fucks the guys who found it in the ass. Typical.

This is why, when you find something valuable, you KEEP YOUR FRIGGIN' MOUTH SHUT ABOUT IT!



I was just going to say the same thing - SHUT THE FUCK UP about it, launder the money, and live off the interest for the rest of your life. Jeez.



The problem is that much of the modern dollar value of lost treasure is not in the spot price of silver & gold but the antiquity, historic and archaeological significance that collectors, museums, etc. (mostly private collectors) are willing to pay $$$ for. Unfortunately, to command the premium dollar amount that a collector is willing to pay for your "treasure", you must be able to support your find with provedance. Provedance places a specific artifact in a specific place at a specific time and the provedance must remain unbroken in order to maintain the added value. As an example, a gold 2 Escudo coin with good provedance from the wreck of the 1715 fleet may fetch $3000 or $4000 -vs- some guy at a flea market who claims his coins came from the 1715 fleet (with no provedance) that may sell for $300 to $400.

For this guy to loot the buried treasure and start trying to convert it into cash without the provedance (including a valid proof of claim to the find, independant archaeolgy, field documentation, and line item object recovery record with notation from find# to first point of retail sale) all he has is the spot value of silver & gold which may not be enough to even cover the cost of recovery.



I'm thinkin spot price alone would cover costs on 600 BARRELS of gold coins.



Maybe, but from personal experience I know treasure hunts can get pretty expensive.
Link Posted: 9/26/2005 10:36:39 AM EDT
melt it down and take Spot Price
Link Posted: 9/26/2005 10:40:42 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/26/2005 10:44:36 AM EDT
holy crap, i want that robot!
Link Posted: 9/26/2005 10:46:29 AM EDT
any of you fellows up for a field trip?
Link Posted: 9/26/2005 10:47:11 AM EDT
I dont see how even a barrel of gold COULDNT be worth alot of money ? Gold is Gold -

If they had just not said anything and slowly took a couple barrels every so often and sold it for melt down or something - what kinda money you think they would get ? (not that i think they should do that- just curious)

I say we take an arsenal and become "pirates" and take their loot : )
Link Posted: 9/26/2005 10:51:51 AM EDT
This reminds me of that hiker in Utah who supposedly found quite a treasure (I think it was this past summer) and wanted some of it as a finder's fee. But when he went to the .gov, they said they weren't going to give him any. So he said "screw you" and didn't tell them where the treasure was. I don't blame him. I'd have loaded it up and took it home and kept it in my basement. Even if I couldn't convert it to cash, at least the .gov or some other hiker wouldn't get the booty. I think that lots of the stuff this hiker found was in civil war era notes or something. Can't remember...
Link Posted: 9/26/2005 11:00:20 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Greywolf2112:

Originally Posted By Swindle1984:
Nice how the government fucks the guys who found it in the ass. Typical.

This is why, when you find something valuable, you KEEP YOUR FRIGGIN' MOUTH SHUT ABOUT IT!



I was just going to say the same thing - SHUT THE FUCK UP about it, launder the money, and live off the interest for the rest of your life. Jeez.

10 billion in gold coins could slowly be laundered anywhere. Next time SSS.
Link Posted: 9/26/2005 11:03:13 AM EDT
ARRRRGGHH!!

Ye'll never get away with my swag ye sawbs!

Come about and reef yer top'sls ye landlubbers and listen up! Turn over me treasure or prepare for the BLACK SPOT!!!

Sure as Cap'n Billy Bones ghost I'll keelhaul yer arses if ye don't come about!
Link Posted: 9/26/2005 11:04:05 AM EDT
There ain't no keeping a stash like that quiet.

Can you imagine all the equipment you would need to dig a 50 foot deep hole?

First, you'd have to buy the land. What if it wasn't for sale? What if it was public property?
Then you have to move the equipment out there and start digging. What would you use as a cover for your activity? Don't you think some building inspector would be curious about what you are doing?

Then, who would you get to actually do the digging? Wouldn't they wonder why you were covering them with a rifle? What would you do to keep them from talking after they got to the treasure and saw what was coming up?

You can't keep something like that quiet.
Link Posted: 9/26/2005 11:36:52 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Makarov:
The problem is that much of the modern dollar value of lost treasure is not in the spot price of silver & gold but the antiquity, historic and archaeological significance that collectors, museums, etc. (mostly private collectors) are willing to pay $$$ for. Unfortunately, to command the premium dollar amount that a collector is willing to pay for your "treasure", you must be able to support your find with provedance. Provedance places a specific artifact in a specific place at a specific time and the provedance must remain unbroken in order to maintain the added value. As an example, a gold 2 Escudo coin with good provedance from the wreck of the 1715 fleet may fetch $3000 or $4000 -vs- some guy at a flea market who claims his coins came from the 1715 fleet (with no provedance) that may sell for $300 to $400.

For this guy to loot the buried treasure and start trying to convert it into cash without the provedance (including a valid proof of claim to the find, independant archaeolgy, field documentation, and line item object recovery record with notation from find# to first point of retail sale) all he has is the spot value of silver & gold which may not be enough to even cover the cost of recovery.



Good post...but (spelling police hat on) I believe the word is "provenance"...

But you hit the nail on the head...but in this case, if I found the stuff, well screw it, if it is a call between historical and archeological signifigance and $0 for me, or 1/3 to 1/2 the actual value in my pocket, that shits getting melted down.

Its to bad the damn govs reduce things to that choice. But almost every country including the US will f*ck you out of any signifcant treasure find if it gets out...look at all the battles Mel Fisher went through....
Top Top