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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/15/2010 3:33:34 PM EDT
Moved into the new ABNAK compound a few weeks ago and we're gonna put a metal roof on and be done with it for the rest of my life (45yo today ). At any rate, need a few questions answered if ya can:

1) What gauge would be optimal for keeping dents (like hail) out of it?

2) Should the existing shingles be removed?

3) (this may tie in to #3) Should it be set up with spacers to allow air circulation? If so, leave the old shingles in place?

4) Reasonable expectation of cost, i.e. per the sq/ft of house?

Will add that the pitch of the roof is "normal" (11 degrees?) so no steepness to increase the cost.

Link Posted: 9/15/2010 3:43:41 PM EDT
Originally Posted By ABNAK:
Moved into the new ABNAK compound a few weeks ago and we're gonna put a metal roof on and be done with it for the rest of my life (45yo today ). At any rate, need a few questions answered if ya can:

1) What gauge would be optimal for keeping dents (like hail) out of it? Metal usually comes in two guages: 26 & 29. Obviously 26 is "thicker" but 29 should be just fine for a long time.

2) Should the existing shingles be removed? Yes.

3) (this may tie in to #3) Should it be set up with spacers to allow air circulation? If so, leave the old shingles in place? You should use 1x firring strip or 2x as purlins underneath the metal.

4) Reasonable expectation of cost, i.e. per the sq/ft of house? In my area (Central NY), metal is running around $2.30-$2.50 a lineal foot. Most panels are going to be 38" wide (36" + 1" of overlap on each side. Get the distance from your peak to your eave and that will give you your panel length. Take the distance from gable end to gable end and divide by 3 which will give you the amount of panels you need on one side and then double that for the other side.

Will add that the pitch of the roof is "normal" (11 degrees?) so no steepness to increase the cost. "Steepness" doesnt add to the cost but panel length does. The higher your pitch, the longer the panel will need to be and thus the more expense you will incur.



Link Posted: 9/15/2010 3:48:06 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Adirondack47:
Originally Posted By ABNAK:
Moved into the new ABNAK compound a few weeks ago and we're gonna put a metal roof on and be done with it for the rest of my life (45yo today ). At any rate, need a few questions answered if ya can:

1) What gauge would be optimal for keeping dents (like hail) out of it? Metal usually comes in two guages: 26 & 29. Obviously 26 is "thicker" but 29 should be just fine for a long time.

2) Should the existing shingles be removed? Yes.

3) (this may tie in to #3) Should it be set up with spacers to allow air circulation? If so, leave the old shingles in place? You should use 1x firring strip or 2x as purlins underneath the metal.

4) Reasonable expectation of cost, i.e. per the sq/ft of house? In my area (Central NY), metal is running around $2.30-$2.50 a lineal foot. Most panels are going to be 38" wide (36" + 1" of overlap on each side. Get the distance from your peak to your eave and that will give you your panel length. Take the distance from gable end to gable end and divide by 3 which will give you the amount of panels you need on one side and then double that for the other side.

Will add that the pitch of the roof is "normal" (11 degrees?) so no steepness to increase the cost. "Steepness" doesnt add to the cost but panel length does. The higher your pitch, the longer the panel will need to be and thus the more expense you will incur.





Thanks. Not being a real "handyman" per se, what are firring strips and purlins? Is that in effect leaving a space between the roof and the metal roof for circulation?

Link Posted: 9/15/2010 4:59:43 PM EDT
Originally Posted By ABNAK:
Originally Posted By Adirondack47:
Originally Posted By ABNAK:
Moved into the new ABNAK compound a few weeks ago and we're gonna put a metal roof on and be done with it for the rest of my life (45yo today ). At any rate, need a few questions answered if ya can:

1) What gauge would be optimal for keeping dents (like hail) out of it? Metal usually comes in two guages: 26 & 29. Obviously 26 is "thicker" but 29 should be just fine for a long time.

2) Should the existing shingles be removed? Yes.

3) (this may tie in to #3) Should it be set up with spacers to allow air circulation? If so, leave the old shingles in place? You should use 1x firring strip or 2x as purlins underneath the metal.

4) Reasonable expectation of cost, i.e. per the sq/ft of house? In my area (Central NY), metal is running around $2.30-$2.50 a lineal foot. Most panels are going to be 38" wide (36" + 1" of overlap on each side. Get the distance from your peak to your eave and that will give you your panel length. Take the distance from gable end to gable end and divide by 3 which will give you the amount of panels you need on one side and then double that for the other side.

Will add that the pitch of the roof is "normal" (11 degrees?) so no steepness to increase the cost. "Steepness" doesnt add to the cost but panel length does. The higher your pitch, the longer the panel will need to be and thus the more expense you will incur.





Thanks. Not being a real "handyman" per se, what are firring strips and purlins? Is that in effect leaving a space between the roof and the metal roof for circulation?




Firring strips and just 1x3x length utility material used for all kinds of stuff. "purlins" are the 2' spaced courses run perpendicular to the metal that youll use to nail the metal into. Just like joists on a deck frame that run perpendicular to your deck boards.

Link Posted: 9/15/2010 5:55:47 PM EDT
Good info given so far, might I recommend putting down some "foil bubble" before your metal. I did on my place and it helps unbelievably with the radiant heat reflection as well as being a good moisture barrier. It's like regular bubble wrap with a layer of reflective foil inside that reflects heat. You can get it with the foil just on one side or both sides. It comes in 4' width in rolls 125' long and I installed mine with button cap nails - similar to a roofing nail with a large plastic washer (button) on it. I used the aluminum duct tape to seal the edges where the foil meets. I used 1x4 pine boards on my house and outbuildings on 2' spacing across my trusses to install my metal. Screws will cost you a good little bit - you'll need the regular screws with rubber washers to attach the metal to the wood strips and then you'll need stitch screws to do the seams where 2 panels of metal overlap - won't take near as many stitch screws as the regular ones. I also did the siding on my house and buildings with metal too - did the bubble wrap there as well and am really pleased with it after 4 years of heating/cooling. I used the 29 gauge painted galvalume metal for both the roof and walls and it's plenty heavy enough - have had several hail storms with no detectable dents yet. Have walked on the roof many times and I weigh about 240 lbs - no damages from that either.
Link Posted: 9/16/2010 5:10:29 AM EDT
Originally Posted By 22skip:
Good info given so far, might I recommend putting down some "foil bubble" before your metal. I did on my place and it helps unbelievably with the radiant heat reflection as well as being a good moisture barrier. It's like regular bubble wrap with a layer of reflective foil inside that reflects heat. You can get it with the foil just on one side or both sides. It comes in 4' width in rolls 125' long and I installed mine with button cap nails - similar to a roofing nail with a large plastic washer (button) on it. I used the aluminum duct tape to seal the edges where the foil meets. I used 1x4 pine boards on my house and outbuildings on 2' spacing across my trusses to install my metal. Screws will cost you a good little bit - you'll need the regular screws with rubber washers to attach the metal to the wood strips and then you'll need stitch screws to do the seams where 2 panels of metal overlap - won't take near as many stitch screws as the regular ones. I also did the siding on my house and buildings with metal too - did the bubble wrap there as well and am really pleased with it after 4 years of heating/cooling. I used the 29 gauge painted galvalume metal for both the roof and walls and it's plenty heavy enough - have had several hail storms with no detectable dents yet. Have walked on the roof many times and I weigh about 240 lbs - no damages from that either.


I plan on having it done by a roofer, not doing it myself. I'm gathering info to throw out there when getting estimates. A contractor who did some improvements on our old house in July gave me a ballpark estimate (based just on a "normal" pitch roof and the approximate sq/ft of the new house only, no visual) of ~$8,000 give or take.

Obviously whatever each individual roofer does is going to be the "best way" as he peddles his wares. For instance, one guy I talked to said he'd leave the old shingles on; maybe too cheap/lazy to remove them? Consensus here (above and via PM) says hell yes you remove the old shingles. Spacing of the metal above the surface of the roof also seems to have a majority vote. How to fasten them together varies.

Nonetheless, I'd like to be somewhat informed with the various opinions of folks in the know as to what works best, i.e. a variety of opinions and input.

Link Posted: 9/16/2010 5:21:20 AM EDT
Send a pm to JCKnife he works for Classic Metal Roofing.
Link Posted: 9/16/2010 5:34:49 AM EDT
Most of the metal roots I have seen put up keep the existing shingles in place.

Not saying it is right though.
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