Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login

Site Notices
Posted: 2/2/2011 7:32:21 AM EDT
My neighbor came across several extension cords recently in a garage sale.
They were rigged up to provide 110 service from a 220 plug.
The male end had a 50 amp 220 plug, and the female terminated into two cords using one leg for a 110 box and the other leg for another 110 box.


Question, is this safe?
There were various opinions around the coffee shop.
Some said it was perfectly safe, while others thought a bad breaker could cause 220 to a 110 plug.

what says the hive?
Link Posted: 2/2/2011 7:33:46 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/2/2011 7:35:15 AM EDT by QwikKotaTx]
Plugs or connectors mean nothing. What gauge wire? I am using 8 gauge wire to hook up my welder which is 30amps 220 single phase but 10 gauge would be fine. If they are 12 gauge or smaller I would throw them away for 220.

I see you are using 110v, apologies. How is the insulation patched in the split to two different connectors? If they are cut and taped that may not be safe especially around water.
Link Posted: 2/2/2011 7:35:37 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/2/2011 7:38:07 AM EDT by rwilkins01]
not a good idea. no ground wire,only a neutral, sounds like. while it will w*rk in theory........

ETA: after looking at your avatar title, i'd ask if you could borrow it...profit!
Link Posted: 2/2/2011 7:36:55 AM EDT
Not no but FUCK NO.
Link Posted: 2/2/2011 7:37:51 AM EDT
A 50 amp plug would (if everything is correct) be plugged into a 50 amp circuit. Most 120 volt circuits are rated for a max of 20 amp (unless wired and configured otherwise).To answer your question, not a good idea, IMO.
Link Posted: 2/2/2011 10:46:32 AM EDT
I agree because of the circuit breaker amperage issue. Bad idea.

If you need to do this, change the whole 220VAC circuit back to 120VAC. Split out the 220VAC wall outlet to either two separate 120VAC feeds or use one and stub and wrap the other. (This is assuming you have a good ground wire back to the panel.) THEN replace the two-pole-single-throw 30A circuit breaker with a (or two) single pole 120VAC circuit breaker.

Aw heck, another electrician could figure out what I am trying to say...
Link Posted: 2/2/2011 10:55:36 AM EDT
Originally Posted By SuperJanitor:
A 50 amp plug would (if everything is correct) be plugged into a 50 amp circuit. Most 120 volt circuits are rated for a max of 20 amp (unless wired and configured otherwise).To answer your question, not a good idea, IMO.


Yep this, your gonna burn something up if you start pulling too many amps. Plugging in small things like lights, etc are dont see any problem. I wouldnt hook up a air compressor on one side and a space heater on the other side or you might have a fire on your hands.
Link Posted: 2/2/2011 11:04:23 AM EDT
Cut that contraption into a million pieces
Link Posted: 2/2/2011 11:09:29 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Sparky:
Cut that contraption into a million pieces


This. It's just a bad idea all the way around. You don't use a hammer to drive a screw... don't do this. There is a reason a 240 plug is different than a 120. It's just not meant for that purpose. As others have said 240 typically has much higher amperage breakers... too much draw and shit will burn.
Link Posted: 2/2/2011 11:13:11 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/2/2011 11:18:40 AM EDT by wicketsurplus]
it all depends on end use and how they are wired, it could be someones unsafe cob job. Or it could be a muti circuit patch cord, commonly used for temporary power at events or concerts. How many wires in the cord? 3 or 4? There are many types of 240V male plugs, is it a twist lock or straight blade? Is it a black SO or SJ cord?
ETA nevermind, reread and saw 50A Plug.
Not rated for 15 or 20A 120v receptacles at the other end.
Link Posted: 2/2/2011 11:18:02 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/2/2011 11:30:44 AM EDT by wicketsurplus]
Originally Posted By Thumbtack:
Originally Posted By Sparky:
Cut that contraption into a million pieces


This. It's just a bad idea all the way around. You don't use a hammer to drive a screw... don't do this. There is a reason a 240 plug is different than a 120. It's just not meant for that purpose. As others have said 240 typically has much higher amperage breakers... too much draw and shit will burn.


It is perfectly ok to split 240V into 2 120v circuits, what do you think happens in your panel, you must however have a neutral present, not just a ground, and also 240v breakers are not just for higher amperage, 240V breakers come in all different Amperage ratings, all depends on application.
ETA: not saying the application the OP stated is correct, it is not. It is unsafe.



Cut that contraption into a million pieces


No, either remove cobbed plug and recepts. and reuse cord for a proper application, or strip it and cash in the copper!
Link Posted: 2/2/2011 11:21:09 AM EDT
Will it work? Probably.

Is it a good idea? Probably not.

You could easily exceed the capacity of the cord before tripping the breaker. Melted cord and/or potential for fire and/or shock are likely.

If you used a 30-amp dryer plug instead of a 50-amp range plug, I'd be less concerned - but it's still not a good idea.
Link Posted: 2/2/2011 11:24:36 AM EDT
Originally Posted By yamatitan:
Originally Posted By SuperJanitor:
A 50 amp plug would (if everything is correct) be plugged into a 50 amp circuit. Most 120 volt circuits are rated for a max of 20 amp (unless wired and configured otherwise).To answer your question, not a good idea, IMO.


Yep this, your gonna burn something up if you start pulling too many amps. Plugging in small things like lights, etc are dont see any problem. I wouldnt hook up a air compressor on one side and a space heater on the other side or you might have a fire on your hands.


I think this is your answer.

Link Posted: 2/2/2011 2:06:53 PM EDT
Originally Posted By wicketsurplus:
Originally Posted By Thumbtack:
Originally Posted By Sparky:
Cut that contraption into a million pieces


This. It's just a bad idea all the way around. You don't use a hammer to drive a screw... don't do this. There is a reason a 240 plug is different than a 120. It's just not meant for that purpose. As others have said 240 typically has much higher amperage breakers... too much draw and shit will burn.


It is perfectly ok to split 240V into 2 120v circuits, what do you think happens in your panel, you must however have a neutral present, not just a ground, and also 240v breakers are not just for higher amperage, 240V breakers come in all different Amperage ratings, all depends on application.
ETA: not saying the application the OP stated is correct, it is not. It is unsafe.



Cut that contraption into a million pieces


No, either remove cobbed plug and recepts. and reuse cord for a proper application, or strip it and cash in the copper!


It is not acceptable to plug that contraption into a 240v outlet and use it like that. Any large draw and there is no breaker to shut it off. Shit will catch on fire. What happens in my panel is not the same as this crap.
Top Top