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Posted: 10/18/2004 6:25:35 PM EST
What plants would anyone recommend to plant say outside a window or anywhere one would not want people intruding into. Anything with razor-sharp thorns or the like would be preferred. A shrub or bush that could be kept trimmed and neat would be the best as I am trying to be subtly secure.
Link Posted: 10/18/2004 6:36:11 PM EST
....Dr. Greenthumb, paging Dr. Greenthumb.....
Link Posted: 10/18/2004 6:37:11 PM EST
russian olive, composed of 98% thorns.
Link Posted: 10/18/2004 6:38:13 PM EST

Originally Posted By howlie:
russian olive, composed of 98% thorns.



+10

although they like dry climates.

Link Posted: 10/18/2004 6:39:25 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/18/2004 6:39:45 PM EST by Specop_007]
Roses work well.
Poison ivy?

Just remember, thorns dont stop zombies.
Link Posted: 10/18/2004 6:41:10 PM EST
Pyrracantha, aka Fire Thorn is a great barrier plant. The thorns are needle sharp and about 1.5 - 2 inches long. And Lordy do they hurt. I imagine they would deter a crackhead.
Link Posted: 10/18/2004 6:41:41 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/18/2004 6:42:05 PM EST by California_Kid]
Agave, or prickly pear cactus.
Link Posted: 10/18/2004 6:42:41 PM EST
Isnt there some type of bush/brush that grows in SE Asia that has like 2in thorns?

Roger that, thorns do not stop zombies. Gotta work on my zombie defense plan later.
Link Posted: 10/18/2004 6:44:03 PM EST
I prefer not to have shrubs close to the house that someone could hide behind as they try to break in.
Link Posted: 10/18/2004 6:47:56 PM EST

Originally Posted By Cougar8045:
I prefer not to have shrubs close to the house that someone could hide behind as they try to break in.



I agree to an extent. The area directly in front of the windows is covered by a motion sensitive flood light, but if they are gonna try to break in, I dont want it to be a cakewalk.
Link Posted: 10/18/2004 6:48:24 PM EST
Oregon grape holly(Mahonia aquifolium), any of the barberry varieties (Berberis thunbergii) , chinese holly(Ilex cornuta). My favorite is thorny eleagnus(Eleagnus pungens).

Check this site out for other options: www.ces.ncsu.edu/moore/newsletters/plantsgardennotes.html
Link Posted: 10/18/2004 6:59:28 PM EST
I personally like the kind that has razor wire in them. . .
Link Posted: 10/18/2004 7:03:44 PM EST

Originally Posted By Krazny13:
I personally like the kind that has razor wire in them. . .



I agree completely, nothing says lovin' like concertina wire in the bushes, it just may be indefensible in court ie. "The despicable gun owner set a trap for my client, putting military grade razor sharp wire in the bushes to keep it from being seen"

Besides, bushes dont rust.
Link Posted: 10/18/2004 7:07:54 PM EST
Heh.
They aint gonna make it to a court if they get in my shrubs. . .
But, I have a shotgun, a shovel, and a large patch of woods behind the house. . . .

Actually, there is a small type of plum tree that works well. They hurt like hell if you get into them. ( I know, my former employer had them all over, and they had to be trimmed every couple months)
Link Posted: 10/18/2004 7:20:19 PM EST
Are you thinking of Natal Plum (Carissa Macrocarpa)? Not really a plum...

Thorny, makes a nice hedge, can be clipped

The fruits are attractive, ripen red. Fruit resembles apple flesh inside- edible (make jelly). Semi tropical, and grows well to about 25 deg f.

Don't know your climate but it grows well in 'greater L.A." I hate pyrocantha but it is a good choice for barriers. Yellow or red/orange berries. I hate it only because I fell in it as a child. Ouch!


Gwen the Gardener

Link Posted: 10/18/2004 7:24:28 PM EST
Link Posted: 10/18/2004 7:27:20 PM EST
Yucca


Link Posted: 10/18/2004 7:30:26 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/18/2004 7:37:55 PM EST by DK-Prof]
THere's a big difference among roses - some have the occasional thorn on relatively clean canes, and others have very dense thorns all over the cane. Some species roses are absolutely brutal.



(There is a type of species/wild rose that grows all over Denmark that I've been trying to find for years in the U.S. - that would be AWESOME for this kind of application.)

Link Posted: 10/18/2004 7:32:52 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/18/2004 7:34:03 PM EST by rayra]
Georgia? Bouganvillea
Sturdy vines like grapes. Pretty colors. Prune to any shape / size. Deadly inch-long spines that will pierce ANYTHING.
Link Posted: 10/18/2004 7:46:41 PM EST
Firebush (commonname) don't know the botanical name. All around my driveway. I've chopped and hacked at this stuff for 10 years and it just keeps growing and growing and growing.

It grows 2 feet each year. I finally have it under control. It has 1 to 2 inch neddle size thorns. REALLY sharp and they hurt like hell.

Then theres 'Multi floral rose' (again, don't the botanical name). It was imported to make "Natural" fence rows.

This stuff is nasty!!! Big bush, grows prolific, LARGE THORNS, Almost Impossible to kill out once it gets started, I actually use my chain saw on this stuff.

Want some sprouts of either of these?? Just pay shipping and I'll send you all you want next spring. Or just come and dig it up yourself.
Link Posted: 10/18/2004 7:50:11 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/18/2004 7:55:19 PM EST by California_Kid]

Originally Posted By rayra:
Georgia? Bouganvillea
Sturdy vines like grapes. Pretty colors. Prune to any shape / size. Deadly inch-long spines that will pierce ANYTHING.



The "boug" thrives in San Diego. You can saw the thing off at ground level every winter, and it will grow back bigger every year no matter how bad your soil is.

Two or three years' growth will make a 12-foot high man-stopper as wide as you let it get.

On edit: Check your state and local laws before planting a bougainvillea. I think they're banned in Florida.
Link Posted: 10/18/2004 11:56:52 PM EST
lol wait did i heard that right! there is something that isnt illegal in california but is banned in another state!!!!!
Link Posted: 10/19/2004 4:46:18 AM EST
Staghorn Cholla. This is THE most evil plant on Gods green earth.

AB
Link Posted: 10/19/2004 4:53:16 AM EST
I dug a moat......
Link Posted: 10/19/2004 4:56:31 AM EST

Originally Posted By Mahatma8Rice:
Pyrracantha, aka Fire Thorn is a great barrier plant. The thorns are needle sharp and about 1.5 - 2 inches long. And Lordy do they hurt. I imagine they would deter a crackhead.



+1. These things are NASTY. Ops
Link Posted: 10/19/2004 5:00:00 AM EST
Green painted triple strand concertina wire.
Link Posted: 10/19/2004 5:01:00 AM EST

Originally Posted By IchWarrior:
Yucca






+1
Link Posted: 10/19/2004 5:43:46 AM EST


Multiflora rose.
Link Posted: 10/19/2004 11:39:47 AM EST

Originally Posted By danonly:

Originally Posted By howlie:
russian olive, composed of 98% thorns.



although they like dry climates.




You would be surprised...my parents had two of them in a swampy part of our yard and they grew and grew. But they aren't really a bush, more of a tree.

GunLvr
Link Posted: 10/19/2004 11:41:39 AM EST
This thread inspired me, and I just orderd 30 (rosa rugosa) wild roses to be delivered in the spring.

It'll take a while for them to grow in, but thanks to all of you for making me remember to get some!
Link Posted: 10/19/2004 11:55:40 AM EST
Link Posted: 10/19/2004 11:57:57 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/19/2004 12:01:38 PM EST by cyanide]
Multi flora rose bush

Multiflora rose is a vigorous, prickly bush with clumps of
long, arching stems. Because of its hooked thorns and
the drooping nature of the branches, people lightly
brushing against a branch may find themselves firmly
attached.



www.extension.iastate.edu/Publications/PM863.pdf
Link Posted: 10/19/2004 12:08:27 PM EST

Originally Posted By Cougar8045:
I prefer not to have shrubs close to the house that someone could hide behind as they try to break in.



+1

Link Posted: 10/19/2004 12:14:31 PM EST

Originally Posted By The_Beer_Slayer:
i plant claymores in the fall.

mike



Link Posted: 10/19/2004 12:18:53 PM EST
Here in East Texas we have the wild lemon. If you planted it close together, you could make a nice hedge out of it. Has about 2 inch long thorns, and produces yellow fruit in the fall. Stays green all year, and you can't kill it.
Link Posted: 10/19/2004 4:58:18 PM EST

Pyrracantha, aka Fire Thorn is a great barrier plant. The thorns are needle sharp and about 1.5 - 2 inches long. And Lordy do they hurt. I imagine they would deter a crackhead.


+1. I had to clear out an out of control firethorn bush after I moved into my house a few years ago. The 1"-plus thorns go through a leather glove like it's not even there.

If you get firethorn, keep up with trimming it or you'll eventually have one hell of a fun time getting it back under control.
Link Posted: 10/19/2004 5:10:45 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/19/2004 5:11:27 PM EST by legalese77]

Originally Posted By DK-Prof:
THere's a big difference among roses - some have the occasional thorn on relatively clean canes, and others have very dense thorns all over the cane. Some species roses are absolutely brutal.



(There is a type of species/wild rose that grows all over Denmark that I've been trying to find for years in the U.S. - that would be AWESOME for this kind of application.)




multiflora rose are like nature's razorwire but are a noxious weed (at least in IL) and so cultivating them is prohibited...they're so nasty and difficult to manage that you wouldn't want them anyway
Link Posted: 10/19/2004 5:42:16 PM EST
I’ve got a couple of Japanese Barberry bushes under a back window which have thorns that are like hypodermic needles!

They were planted by a prior owner, possibly to discourage break-ins.

They can be pruned back to keep them small (though I learned the hard way that you have to be really careful handling the clippings!!).

They’re green in the summer and purple in the fall. However, in the winter they lose all their leaves and look pretty ratty.

Not sure you’d want these if you’ve got small kids around since, to my mind, they’re pretty wicked.

Link Posted: 10/19/2004 5:58:55 PM EST
punji sticks work well, too. cut some barbs into them so you can't pull them out.
Link Posted: 10/19/2004 6:08:45 PM EST
Link Posted: 10/19/2004 6:59:48 PM EST
When the zombie you bury there rises up and grabs their ass, word will get out.

OTOH, are you trying to keep somebody out, or IN?
Link Posted: 10/19/2004 7:37:15 PM EST

Originally Posted By legalese77:

Originally Posted By DK-Prof:
THere's a big difference among roses - some have the occasional thorn on relatively clean canes, and others have very dense thorns all over the cane. Some species roses are absolutely brutal.



(There is a type of species/wild rose that grows all over Denmark that I've been trying to find for years in the U.S. - that would be AWESOME for this kind of application.)




multiflora rose are like nature's razorwire but are a noxious weed (at least in IL) and so cultivating them is prohibited...they're so nasty and difficult to manage that you wouldn't want them anyway




Yeah - apparently they were DELIBERATELY brough into the US in the 1930, and their use was widely encouraged to avoid using barbed wire - but now it's a bit out of control

Link Posted: 10/19/2004 7:48:54 PM EST

Originally Posted By DK-Prof:
THere's a big difference among roses - some have the occasional thorn on relatively clean canes, and others have very dense thorns all over the cane. Some species roses are absolutely brutal.



(There is a type of species/wild rose that grows all over Denmark that I've been trying to find for years in the U.S. - that would be AWESOME for this kind of application.)




Are you thinking Rosa canina or the dog rose, maybe?

Be careful, woody plants like multi-floral rose or autumn olives can quickly take over any unmanaged area and may be very expensive to control once established. And need a LOT of Triming atention to be certain they don't "take over".

Link Posted: 10/19/2004 7:52:32 PM EST
Excellent, with ARFCOM being a varitable font of knowledge, my gardening can begin. With all of these evil plants, I can start planning my garden of tactical topiaries.
Link Posted: 10/19/2004 8:11:37 PM EST

Originally Posted By DK-Prof:

Originally Posted By legalese77:

Originally Posted By DK-Prof:
THere's a big difference among roses - some have the occasional thorn on relatively clean canes, and others have very dense thorns all over the cane. Some species roses are absolutely brutal.



(There is a type of species/wild rose that grows all over Denmark that I've been trying to find for years in the U.S. - that would be AWESOME for this kind of application.)




multiflora rose are like nature's razorwire but are a noxious weed (at least in IL) and so cultivating them is prohibited...they're so nasty and difficult to manage that you wouldn't want them anyway




Yeah - apparently they were DELIBERATELY brough into the US in the 1930, and their use was widely encouraged to avoid using barbed wire - but now it's a bit out of control




We're real good for that sort of thing...now it's those damn japanese beetles..they look like orange ladybugs but bite and ooze some liquid that smells like wet leaves rotting in the bottom of a barrel, whew!! Can't we import something to kill thase damnable creatures
Link Posted: 10/19/2004 8:17:34 PM EST

Originally Posted By California_Kid:

Originally Posted By rayra:
Georgia? Bouganvillea
Sturdy vines like grapes. Pretty colors. Prune to any shape / size. Deadly inch-long spines that will pierce ANYTHING.



The "boug" thrives in San Diego. You can saw the thing off at ground level every winter, and it will grow back bigger every year no matter how bad your soil is.

Two or three years' growth will make a 12-foot high man-stopper as wide as you let it get.

On edit: Check your state and local laws before planting a bougainvillea. I think they're banned in Florida.

I've got it growing here at home in north Los Angeles, and if it weren't for 2-3 weeks of sub-32F temps, I'd have it at my 2nd home in the Sierras, too.
Link Posted: 10/19/2004 8:33:14 PM EST

Originally Posted By bvmjethead:

Originally Posted By IchWarrior:
Yucca






+1



+2

Running through the woods, this plant will make you come to a dead stop at the drop of a hat. Plus, it's not thick enough to hide behind.
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